Descendants of James Clark


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1. Thomas Clark, son of James Clark and Ann Harritt, was baptised on 13 Feb 1763 in St Mary's, Whickham, Durham.1

General Notes:  As far as is known no family documents have survived from the 18th and early 19th century that provide any clue to earlier generations of this Clark family. Indeed, these Clarks have shown little interest in their family history over the generations and there appears to have been no attempt at any time to create a family tree. Additionally, there are many Clarks or Clarkes (this family or those writing about them seem to have used both spellings) to be found in Northumberland and Durham in that period. This makes identifying a particular family line very difficult, particularly, as during the 19th century, the Clark family from whom this writer is descended was most reticence about publicising their births, deaths and marriages.

 The first Clark that can be identified with any degree of certainty is Thomas but, sadly, very little has been discovered about him. It seems likely that his parents were James Clark and Ann Harritt who were married at Whickham in County Durham in 1762 but lived at Swalwell in that parish. The reasons for thinking so are: First, after James died in 1799, a son named Thomas applied for the administration of his personal estate (it amounted to between £200 and £300) in August 1800. That Thomas was described in the Consistory Court order as "… of Hebburn in the County of Durham Engineer". Secondly, it seems likely that the Thomas of this piece was born sometime in the early 1760s otherwise he would not have been over 21 years of age when he married, and James and Ann had a son they called Thomas born in 1763. Thirdly, it seems probable that James Clark was an engineer at the Crowley Iron Works at Swalwell, which at one time was said to be the largest ironware manufactory in Europe, and so it was somewhere that Thomas could have learnt engineering skills (skills that were hard to obtain in those times). Fourthly, when Thomas did, eventually, have children of his own, he named his eldest son, James, and his eldest daughter, Ann.

 We know that Thomas became an engine-wright and that in the early days of his marriage to Sarah, they lived at Throckley, a small hamlet near Newburn, about 6½ miles north west of Newcastle.  In those times engine-wrights were mostly employed in mining operations, as steam engines were used for pumping and winding, so it is likely that he worked for a colliery.

 Thomas might have been an engine-wright at the Heddon colliery (just south of the Hexham road), which was in operation at that time and would have needed a pumping engine as it was 30 fathoms (180ft) deep. The Heddon colliery's owners were quite innovative - they were the first to install mechanical screening to size their coal and they built an early waggonway to get it down to the staiths on the Tyne at Lemington - so it is likely that they would have used steam engines as well.

 There was also the Dewley Burn Pit nearby, which closed sometime around 1795, where Thomas could have worked.  If so, he would have been a colleague of Robert Stevenson, father of George Stevenson of miner's safety lamp and steam locomotive fame, because Robert was a fireman there from c. 1789 to the time that it closed.

 If the Consistory Court order mentioned above was referring to the Thomas of this piece, then he, Sarah and the family must have moved from Newburn to Hebburn by 1800. Certainly, that is consistent with the early career of their son James who worked at one of the Hebburn collieries until c. 1812. It is not known whether or not Thomas and Sarah lived out their lives at Hebburn because it has not yet been discovered (2015) where they are buried.

NOTE

 The iron works at Swalwell were originally started around the turn of the 17th century in competition with those of Ambrose Crowley (from 1707, Sir Ambrose) at nearby Winlaton but, within a few years of it opening, Sir Ambrose bought it. 

Ambrose Crowley (1658-1713) was the son of a Worcestershire nail manufacturer who became a hugely successful ironmonger/ironmaster in the late 17th and early 18th century. Ambrose Crowley built up a large trading business in ironmongery with offices and warehouses in London but, finding that goods were difficult to obtain due to transportation problems, he decided to set up his own iron works on the north-east coast so that the raw materials and finished goods could be transported by ship. In about 1685 he started nail-making works on the banks of the Wear at Sunderland but it did not find favour with the local community partly on account of the fact that he had to bring in suitably skilled labour from the continent, there being none locally, most of whom were Roman Catholics. 

As a result of his difficulties at Sunderland, he moved the operation to Winlaton near the mouth of the river Derwent in 1691 and in 1707 acquired the works at Swalwell. Over the years the Swalwell works grew to become a very large establishment, extending over several acres, making nails, anchors, chain cables and much other gear for the Navy and merchant ships as well as all sorts of other kinds of iron and steel goods such as spades, shovels and saws. After Sir Ambrose died in 1713, the business was run by his son John until he too died in 1728 and then by Sir Ambrose's widow until she died 1782. After that the business was sold to a consortium that included a Mr. Millington, who had been the manager during the latter years under Lady Crowley. When Millington senior died the management passed to his son Crowley Millington, and the business became known as Crowley, Millington and Company; it survived under various other owners until late in the Victorian era.2,3

Thomas married Sarah Burn on 20 Mar 1785 in All Saints, Newcastle upon Tyne.4 Sarah was born before 1764.

Marriage Notes: Thomas and Sarah were married by Licence which Thomas obtained from the Curate of the Chapelry of All Saints on 12th March 1785.

Sometimes, marriage by Licence rather than the more normal Banns, indicated a degree of urgency in the need to be married. However, being married by Licence was also fashionable because, apart from being a speedy and private way to marry, it showed that the groom could afford the fee & the contractual penalty, if the £200 bond (see below) was ever called in.

Thomas declared that he and Sarah were 'aged twenty one Years and upwards' and that he was a bachelor and Sarah a spinster.

As part of the licencing procedure Thomas and one Joseph Holder (later to be a witness to the marriage) signed a contract agreeing to pay £200 to the Right Worshipful George Harris, Doctor of Laws, Vicar General, and Official Principal of the Bishop of Durham in the event that Thomas or Sarah were shown to be unable to marry lawfully. In this contract Thomas is described as an engine-wright from Newcastle upon Tyne and Joseph as a weaver from Leeds.

Children from this marriage were:

+ 2 M    i. James Clark was born in 1786 in Throckley, Nr Newburn, Northumberland, was baptised on 18 Jun 1786 in St Michael's, Newburn, Northumberland, and died between 1844 and 1850 in South Shields, Co. Durham about age 58.

+ 3 M    ii. William Clark was born in 1787 in Throckley, Nr Newburn, Northumberland, was baptised on 4 Nov 1787 in St Michael's, Newburn, Northumberland,6 died on 13 May 1842 in Farrington Row, Bishopwearmouth, Co. Durham 7 at age 55, and was buried on 16 May 1842 in St Mary's, Chester-le-Street, Co. Durham.8

   4 F    iii. Ann Clark was born in 1791 in Throckley, Nr Newburn, Northumberland and was baptised on 26 Jun 1791 in St Michael's, Newburn, Northumberland.

   5 F    iv. Jane Clark was born on 15 Apr 1794 in Throckley, Nr Newburn, Northumberland 11 and was baptised on 6 May 1794 in Castle Garth Presbyterian Church, Newcastle upon Tyne.12

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2. James Clark was born in 1786 in Throckley, Nr Newburn, Northumberland, was baptised on 18 Jun 1786 in St Michael's, Newburn, Northumberland, and died between 1844 and 1850 in South Shields, Co. Durham about age 58. Hebburn C Pit

General Notes: We know from the baptismal records of his children that James followed in his father's footsteps and became an enginewright. In all probability, the early days of his marriage he worked at the Hebburn Colliery on the south side of the River Tyne because it was at the parish church of Jarrow that his first three children were baptised and Hebburn was in that parish in those days. Later, in about 1811, he moved to near Birtley, not far from Chester-le-Street, ending up in the hamlet of Portobello.

It is not known where James worked in that locality but near Portobello there were at least three collieries & a large ironworks within a miles walk. One of these collieries was Harraton where James's brother William worked as an enginewright and it may be that they were both there together.

James must have moved back to Jarrow sometime around 1827 because his last son William was born there. James probably remained the rest of his life in that area because the 1841 Census shows him and his family living in Pit Row, Hebburn, where he was working as an engineer. Perhaps, he went back to work at the large Hebburn Colliery complex.


The modern day (2005) Portobello was enveloped first by Birtley and then by the large Washington development and now has the A1(M) thundering through it.

James married Hannah Sheldon, daughter of Robert Sheldon and Jane Crow, on 16 Feb 1807 in St Pauls, Jarrow, Co. Durham.5 Hannah was baptised on 29 Apr 1786 in St Mary's, Chester-le-Street, Co. Durham and died in 1854 in South Shields, Co. Durham at age 68.

Children from this marriage were:

+ 6 M    i. Thomas Clark 13 was born on 12 Jun 1807 in Hebburn, Co. Durham 13 and was baptised on 15 Oct 1807 in St Pauls, Jarrow, Co. Durham.13

   7 F    ii. Jane Clark 13 was born on 23 Jul 1808 in Hebburn, Co. Durham.15

Jane married.

Marriage Notes: It has not yet been discovered whether or not Jane survived to marry but there are two reported entries in the Heworth Chapelry records; the first shows a Jane Clark marrying a miner called Joseph Pringle in 1831 and the other shows her marrying a pitman called Jonas Hammond in 1837. These entries have not been examined to determine the name of the bride's father in each case.

   8 F    iii. Sarah Clark 13 was born on 10 Sep 1811 in Hebburn, Co. Durham 16 and was baptised on 3 Oct 1811 in St Pauls, Jarrow, Co. Durham.17

Sarah married.

Marriage Notes: As with her sister Jane, we do not know whether or not Sarah survived to marry but there is an entry in the Heworth Chapelry registers showing a Sarah Clark marrying a Thomas Barkas in 1834. Later the 1841 census shows a Thomas & Sarah Barkas with four children living in Bishopswearmouth, the oldest of whom would have been born in 1835. Thomas is described as a boiler smith. The family disappear from sight after the 1841 census.

   9 F    iv. Hannah Clark 18 was born in Portobello, Nr Birtley, Co. Durham,19 was baptised on 11 Apr 1811 in St Mary's, Chester-le-Street, Co. Durham,19 and died before 1819.

+ 10 M    v. Robert Clark 20 was born in Leefield, Nr Birtley, Co. Durham 20 and was baptised on 11 Aug 1814 in St Mary's, Chester-le-Street, Co. Durham.20

+ 11 M    vi. James Clark 22 was born in Portobello, Nr Birtley, Co. Durham 22 and was baptised on 31 Mar 1816 in St Mary's, Chester-le-Street, Co. Durham.22

   12 F    vii. Hannah Clark 25 was born in Portobello, Nr Birtley, Co. Durham 25 and was baptised on 11 Apr 1819 in St Mary's, Chester-le-Street, Co. Durham.25

+ 13 F    viii. Mary Ann Clark 26 was born in Portobello, Nr Birtley, Co. Durham 26 and was baptised on 2 Jul 1820 in St Mary's, Chester-le-Street, Co. Durham.26

   14 F    ix. Eleanor Clark 29 was born in Portobello, Nr Birtley, Co. Durham,29 was baptised on 29 Sep 1822 in St Mary's, Chester-le-Street, Co. Durham,29 and died in 1855 in South Shields, Co. Durham at age 33.

+ 15 M    x. William Clark was born <1827> in Durham.

3. William Clark was born in 1787 in Throckley, Nr Newburn, Northumberland, was baptised on 4 Nov 1787 in St Michael's, Newburn, Northumberland,6 died on 13 May 1842 in Farrington Row, Bishopwearmouth, Co. Durham 7 at age 55, and was buried on 16 May 1842 in St Mary's, Chester-le-Street, Co. Durham.8 The cause of his death was disease of the heart.

General Notes: Like his elder brother, William followed in his father's footsteps and became an enginewright and he seems to have worked for the Harraton Colliery in the early days of his married life, at least, he lived at place called Harraton Outside, a hamlet near Fatfield, and the only place nearby which would have employed an enginewright in those days was Harraton Colliery. It is not clear from the records that have survived whether William and Dorothy remained in the same house during the time William that worked there, suffice it to say, their first seven children were born in the Fatfield area.

Some time between April 1824 and March 1825 William and family moved to Farrington Row in Bishopwearmouth (the records show that William's and Dorothy's seventh child, Dorothy, died at Fatfield in 1824 and their sixth child, Sarah, at Bishopwearmouth in 1825). Here William and his sons started to build steam engines at a workshop in Cross Street. It is not known what prompted William to make this career change, perhaps by then he had saved up enough money to purchase a house and workshop (he owned the freeholds when he died as he made particular reference to the properties in his Will but he might well have acquired those later) or perhaps he had come into a small inheritance on the death of his father.

The workshop in Cross Street was ideally placed for building steam engines because it was close to the Bishopwearmouth Ironworks1 which could supply not only the necessary castings, forgings, &c., but also carry out the required milling, turning & boring.

If the obituary for William's fourth son, George, is to be believed (Sunderland Daily Echo -15 Jan., 1885), William was the Manager of the Bishopwearmouth Ironworks for many years. It is, however, difficult to square this role with the evidence of the directories covering his earlier days in Bishopwearmouth for they describe him as a "Millwright and Engine Maker", so it must be supposed that he became the Manager of the Ironworks in later years after his sons had gone off on their own.

An earlier article describing the development of George Clark's Southwick Works in 1874 strongly suggests that William was a pioneering steam engine builder on the River Wear to (Sunderland Times -1 Dec.,1874). This pioneering role is confirmed by other accounts which indicate that William was, rightly, credited with the building the steam engines which powered some early tugboats.

About the time that William came to settle in Bishopwearmouth, it was decided that two purpose-built craft for towing should be built on the Wear and William built the 34 HP steam engines which powered their paddle wheels; the tugs were called the Wear and the Dragon; it is known that the Wear was launched in 1825 and in all probability so was the Dragon. The Wear and a smaller tug built on the Tyne were introduced on the Thames in 1832 and it is reported that their owners were very disappointed with them as they lacked the power to tow anything. The following year and (1826), William built a 36 HP steam engine for the tug Neptune, which was also built on the Wear. This tug remained in use on the Wear until 1863 so she must have been a more successful design than the Wear & the Dragon.

The workshop in Cross Street must have been used to build these engines and it is interesting that the William White Directory of 1827 for Durham (it would have been compiled in 1826) has no record of William but lists his eldest son, John, who was only 16 years of age at time, under "Millwrights" at the Cross Street premises and adds "steam engine builder" after John's name, so it is possible that William was, after all, working for the Bishopwearmouth Ironworks even in those early days and at the same time supervising his sons' work.

From 1827 until about 1834 when their mother died, his five elder sons seem to have lived in Farrington Row, even John and Thomas after they were married. Whether or not they were all living in the same house is unclear but the probabilities are that some of them were because when William married again his two married sons, John and later, Thomas, moved elsewhere. It is also very probable that during those years William's sons worked either for him making engines in Cross Street or at the Bishopwearmouth Ironworks, perhaps under his management. His son, Thomas, is always referred to as a "Founder", a trade Thomas would have learnt at the Bishopwearmouth Ironworks, and later went on to establish an iron foundry at Low Elswick, Newcastle upon Tyne.

William was not successful enough, financially, to escape from Farrington Row and the shadow and, no doubt, smoke of the Bishopwearmouth Ironworks which lay south-west of Farrington Row. He died there aged 55, most probably of a heart attack and whilst still working. By then it is very likely that he was employed at the Bishopwearmouth Ironworks as there is no mention of any engine building being carried out in Cross Street - his sons having dispersed - and when he made his Will in January 1840 he described himself as an engineer and made no reference to any business interests or machinery.

One of the witnesses to William's Will was George Forster who is described in it as an "Iron Manufacturer". George was later to become Manager of the Derwent Iron Company (founded in 1840), a company that appears to have taken over the Bishopwearmouth Ironworks, and it is very likely that George Forster was involved with the Bishopwearmouth Ironworks before becoming manager of the Derwent Iron Company.

George must have been a good friend to the Clark family as, in all probability, it was he who engaged William's son George as first engineer at the Consett Iron Works in 1843 not long after it had been opened by the Derwent Iron Company.

William left an estate worth under £600. From his Will, it appears that his second wife, Isabella, kept a grocer's shop in part of the house that they had in Farrington Row; whether she did this for pin money or because the family really needed the additional income is unclear.



Note:

1 Even in 1825 the Bishopwearmouth Ironworks was a substantial manufacturory as the advertisement for its sale due to the bankruptcy of John White, the then owner,  and the engraving to the right (The Ironworks circa: 1830-1840) shows.
Bishopwearmouth Ironworks

BISHOPWEARMOUTH, IN THE COUNTY    
OF DURHAM
Valuable Cast and Malleable Iron Works for Sale by
private Contract.

To be SOLD by private Contract (together or separate),
ALL the new and current-going MANUFACTURORY, situated at the West End of Bishopwearmouth in the County of Durham, and commonly called "Bishopwearmouth Iron Works," lately carried on by John White, Jun. a Bankrupt.

The above Works are conveniently situated, well adapted for carrying on the various Departments of the Scrap Iron, Chain, Anchor, Foundry, and Engine Businesses, &c. &c. as one Concern, or as three separate Divisions as below specified.

1st. The EAST DIVISION, comprising Puddling and other Furnaces, two Rolling Mills for manufacturing Bar and Bold Iron, one small Mill, with Case-hardened Rollers, for rolling small Iron; Cropping Shears, Punching Press, Scarfing and other Machinery used in manufacturing Chain; a powerful and much improved Testing Machine, for proving Chain Cables, together with Messenger Machinery attached thereto, for transporting the Chain to and from the Test, by which the Operation of Testing, &c. is much facilitated.

The Whole of the aforesaid Machinery is driven by two High-Pressure Steam Engines. A Range of Smiths' Shops, containing 16 Hearths fitted with Bellows, Anvils, and a good Assortment of other Tools hitherto used for making Chain; a Set of Patterns nearly complete, for a Forge; a Store-house, and a large Yard.

2nd. The MIDDLE DIVISION, comprising a spacious and convenient Cast Iron Foundry, containing a large and dry Sand Pit, Cranes, Drying Stoves, Cupulas on improved and powerful Blowing Machine, Turning and Boring Lathes, Pattern Makers and Fitting Smith's Shops, and a convenient Yard. The whole furnished with a complete Set of Tools, in an excellent State of Repair, and well arranged for carrying forward the Foundry and Engine Businesses, together with a Quantity of useful Patterns, &c.

3d. The WEST DIVISION, comprising two large Chain-makers Shops, containing 23 Hearths; two Anchor-smiths Shops; one Jobbing-smiths Shop, containing 9 Hearths. The Whole furnished with a complete and excellent Set of Tools for carrying forward the Anchor, Chain, and Jobbing-smiths Work. Also, two Cinder Ovens, Reservoir and a large Yard, &c.

The Whole of the Works are well supplied with Water from a Well situated in the middle Division, and which is conveyed to the different parts by Cast Iron Pipes.

The Hetton and Newbottle Wagon-ways are immediately contiguous, from whence the Works are supplied with Coal. The Whole of the Buildings, &c. comprised and stand upon nearly three Acres of Ground. For further Particulars, enquire of Messrs Thompson, Storey, & Robinson, Assignees of John White, Jun.; R. Blackiston, Esq,. Solicitor, Symond's Inn, London; or to Mr Thompson, Solicitor, Bishopwearmouth.

Bishopwearmouth, 22nd Dec.1825

31,32,33,34,35,36,37,38

Medical Notes: There appears to have been a Coroner's Inquest in to William's death so it is likely to have been sudden. Probably a Heart Attack.

Some things about his life were:

• Will signed: 23 Jan 1840, Bishopwearmouth, Co. Durham. 39 William bequeathed to his wife Isabella the 'Grocer shop and the two rooms joining backward' also the house in Farrington row and Cross street together with all the furniture,'beding and lining', so long as she remained his widow. If she died or remarried, this property was to be used to support his son William until he was twenty one and it was then to be divided equally beween the four sons or their heirs.

He directed that the 'other part of the Property situated in Cross street may either be kept or sold..'. The proceeds to be equally divided between his four sons. William junior's portion being secured in property until he reached the age of twenty one.

All the 'Money, Books and Other Property' were to be equally divided among his sons.

He left his step-daughter, Mary Sharp, if she survived her mother, 'all the Furniture, beding and lining that I got with her mother'. Mary later married a Sunderland butcher called William Brabant and one hopes that she was able to take her inheritance into that marriage.

• Probate Granted: 29 Sep 1842, Durham. 40 Left under £600. Letters of Administration were granted to John Clark, Engine Builder, Thomas Clark, Founder, and George Clark, Engine Builder, all of Bishopswearmouth, the sons and only Residuary Legatees above the age of twenty one. [William was only five]

William married Dorothy Hopper, daughter of John Hopper and Dorothy, on 26 Aug 1810 in All Saints, Newcastle upon Tyne.9 Dorothy was born in 1791 in Chartershaugh, Co. Durham, was baptised on 13 Feb 1791 in St Mary's, Chester-le-Street, Co. Durham,41 died in Jun 1834 in Farrington Row, Bishopwearmouth, Co. Durham at age 43, and was buried on 25 Jun 1834 in St Mary's, Chester-le-Street, Co. Durham.42

Marriage Notes: Dorothy's father was a butcher in the village of Chartershaugh adjacent to Fatfield. In all probability, she and William met in Chartershaugh or Fatfield. As nothing is known of where William's parents died, it may be that William's family had moved to that locality and that William grew up there; more likely, he came to the district to work as an enginewright or apprentice enginewright at the Harraton Colliery.

Why they chose to be married in Newcastle upon Tyne is a bit of a mystery. Possibly Dorothy was in service in Newcastle and it was convenient to use her parish church there. Alternatively, as William's parents were married there, perhaps he wanted to keep up a family tradition by being married there himself. Certainly, when he married for the second time in 1835, he chose the same church.

William and Dorothy must have been much attached to the Fatfield district as they and those of their children who died in the early years while they were living in Bishopwearmouth, were all buried at the parish church of St Mary's, Chester-le-Street. 43

Children from this marriage were:

+ 16 M    i. John Clark was born on 6 Feb 1811 in Fatfield, Co. Durham,44 was baptised on 3 Mar 1811 in St Mary's, Chester-le-Street, Co. Durham,45 died on 11 Oct 1899 in Blyth Cottage, Millfield, Sunderland 46,47 at age 88, and was buried on 13 Oct 1899 in Bishopwearmouth Cemetery, Chester Road, Sunderland.48

+ 17 M    ii. Thomas Clark was born on 4 May 1812 in Harraton-out-Side, Co. Durham,44 was baptised on 4 Oct 1812 in St Mary's, Chester-le-Street, Co. Durham,50 died on 5 Aug 1873 in Ravenswood, North Elswick, Newcastle-upon-Tyne 51,52 at age 61, and was buried in Elswick Cemetery, Newcastle upon Tyne.53

   18 M    iii. William Clark was born in 1814 in Fatfield, Co. Durham, was baptised on 26 Nov 1814 in St Mary's, Chester-le-Street, Co. Durham,54 died in Farrington Row, Bishopwearmouth, Co. Durham, and was buried on 9 Jul 1836 in St Mary's, Chester-le-Street, Co. Durham.42

+ 19 M    iv. George Clark was born on 25 Sep 1815 in Fatfield, Co. Durham,55 was baptised on 8 Oct 1815 in St Mary's, Chester-le-Street, Co. Durham,56 died on 15 Jan 1885 in Oak Lea, Sunderland, Co. Durham 57 at age 69, and was buried on 19 Jan 1885 in Bishopwearmouth Cemetery, Chester Road, Sunderland.58

   20 M    v. James Clark was born in 1818 in Fatfield, Co. Durham, was baptised on 23 Aug 1818 in St Mary's, Chester-le-Street, Co. Durham, died in Farrington Row, Bishopwearmouth, Co. Durham, and was buried on 27 Apr 1834 in St Mary's, Chester-le-Street, Co. Durham.42

   21 F    vi. Sarah Clark was born in 1820 in Fatfield, Co. Durham, was baptised on 20 Aug 1820 in St Mary's, Chester-le-Street, Co. Durham,54 died in Farrington Row, Bishopwearmouth, Co. Durham, and was buried on 27 Mar 1825 in St Mary's, Chester-le-Street, Co. Durham.42 Another name for Sarah was Sarah Clarke.

   22 F    vii. Dorothy Clark was born in Oct 1822 in Fatfield, Co. Durham, was baptised on 15 Dec 1822 in St Mary's, Chester-le-Street, Co. Durham,60 died in Apr 1824 in Fatfield, Co. Durham at age 1, and was buried on 5 Apr 1824 in St Mary's, Chester-le-Street, Co. Durham.42

   23 F    viii. Sarah Clark was born in Apr 1826 in Bishopwearmouth, Co. Durham, died in Apr 1826 in Bishopwearmouth, Co. Durham, and was buried on 12 Apr 1826 in St Mary's, Chester-le-Street, Co. Durham.61 Another name for Sarah was Sarah Clarke.

General Notes: There is no way of establishing definitely that Sarah was a child of William and Dorothy because she did not survive longer enough to be baptised and so have her parentage recorded but she was born in Bishopwearmouth and, like all the other Clark children who died early in life (she lived for just one hour), she was buried in St Mary's Churchyard, Chester-le-Street 42

   24 M    ix. Josiah Clark was born on 17 Jun 1832 in Farrington Row, Bishopwearmouth, Co. Durham and died before 1841.

William next married Isabella Jurdison,62 daughter of Richard Jurdison and Jane Jackson, on 25 Jan 1835 in All Saints, Newcastle upon Tyne.10 Isabella was born <1795> in Westoe, South Shields, Co. Durham, was baptised on 7 Jul 1795 in St. Hilda's Church, South Shields, Co. Durham,62 and died in 1855 in Bishopwearmouth, Co. Durham 63 at age 60.

General Notes: Isabella went on running the Grocers Shop that she and William had and which William left to her in his Will, until her own death in 1855. The 1851 Census shows her spinster sister Jane living with her and helping with the shop. Very probably, Jane went to live with Isabella after Isabella's daughter, Mary, got married to William Brabant in 1848. 64


The child from this marriage was:

   25 M    i. William Clark was born in 1837 in Farrington Row, Bishopwearmouth, Co. Durham, was baptised on 17 Apr 1837 in St Michael's Church, Bishopwearmouth,65 and died on 19 Oct 1883 in 4 South Parade, Newcastle upon Tyne 66 at age 46.

General Notes: William started quite young in the engine building business; by the time of the 1851 Census, when he was barely 14 years of age, he is describing himself as an "Engine Builder". It is not clear whether he was in business on his own account. Usually in this field, employees described themselves as "engineers" or "enginewrights" and proprietors as "engine builders", however, it is difficult to imagine that William was capable of manufacturing engines on his own account at so young an age but he might have learnt enough by then to assemble small engines in his father's old Cross Street workshop for he was still living with his mother in Farrington Row at that time.

After his mother died in 1855 he seems to have continued to live in Farrington Row for a little while because a Directory of 1857 describes him as an "Engineer" living there. However, by 1859 he has left the house and it is now occupied by his half-brother, John, and his family.

By 1861 William is married and living in Dundas Street in Monkwearmouth. His occupation is described as "engineering superintendent" and, given Dundas Street's propinquity to his half-brother George's works in Stobbart Street, it is quite likely that he was employed there.

It is not known when he and Elizabeth moved from Sunderland to Newcastle upon Tyne but by the time of the 1871 Census he is living there and describing himself as an "engineer (marine)". However, shortly afterwards, probably by 1872, he is working with his half nephews, James and Thomas Clark, at T. Clark and Co., Low Elswick, building steam engines.

At some point in time, possibly when he first joined up with James and Thomas or possibly after their father died in 1873, William went into partnership with these two and remained working with them until he died.

During the years that William was working in the Newcastle area, he lived in a couple of houses in Elswick; the last was 4 South Parade (off Westmorland Road) and it was here that he died in October 1883, at the early age of 46. 67,68,69

Some things about his life were:

• Probate Granted: 12 Apr 1884, Newcastle upon Tyne, Northumberland. 70 Personal Estate: £6,443 3s 3d

One of the Executors of William's Will was William Clarke (no relation) who was the joint proprietor, with Captain William Chapman, of the engineering firm called Clarke, Chapman that had its premises at the Victoria Works in Gateshead. Before he founded this business in the 1860s, William Clarke had been working for the Armstrong engineering company in Elswick. It is possible that William had got to know William Clarke at that company in those days.

William married Elizabeth Potter,72,73 daughter of Thomas Potter and Hannah Littlefair, in 1859 in Sunderland, Co. Durham.71 Elizabeth was born on 30 Mar 1837 in Sunderland, Co. Durham 72,74 and died in 1896 in Tynemouth at age 59.  


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6. Thomas Clark 13 was born on 12 Jun 1807 in Hebburn, Co. Durham 13 and was baptised on 15 Oct 1807 in St Pauls, Jarrow, Co. Durham.13

General Notes: Sometime Bailiff or Bailiff's follower

Thomas married Anna Nicholson, daughter of George Nicholson and Mary ———, on 27 Feb 1836 in Heworth, Co. Durham.14 Anna was born <1813> in Penshaw, Co Durham and died in 1854 in Westoe, South Shields, Co. Durham at age 41.

Children from this marriage were:

+ 26 M    i. George Clark 75 was born <1837> in South Shields, Co. Durham.75

   27 M    ii. William J Clark was born <1845> in South Shields, Co. Durham.

+ 28 M    iii. Thomas Clark 75 was born in 1848 in South Shields, Co. Durham.75,77

10. Robert Clark 20 was born in Leefield, Nr Birtley, Co. Durham 20 and was baptised on 11 Aug 1814 in St Mary's, Chester-le-Street, Co. Durham.20

General Notes: Robert seems to have been enginewright all his working life.

Robert married Mary Barnfather 21 on 6 Mar 1837 in Heworth, Co. Durham.21 Mary was born <1816> in Jarrow, Co. Durham 79 and died in 1879 at age 63.

Children from this marriage were:

   29 F    i. Catherine Clark was born <1840> in Bishopwearmouth, Co. Durham.

+ 30 M    ii. Elias Clark was born <1844> in Framwellgate, Co. Durham and died in 1922 in Staffordshire at age 78.

+ 31 M    iii. James Clark 79 was born <1846> in Framwellgate, Co. Durham.79

   32 F    iv. Hannah Clark 79 was born in 1848 in Seaton Delaval, Northumberland.79

+ 33 F    v. Margaret Jane Clark 79 was born in 1850 in Seaton Delaval, Northumberland.79,81

+ 34 M    vi. John Sheldon Wesley Clark 83 was born in 1853 in Castle Edon, Co. Durham.83

11. James Clark 22 was born in Portobello, Nr Birtley, Co. Durham 22 and was baptised on 31 Mar 1816 in St Mary's, Chester-le-Street, Co. Durham.22

General Notes: James was an enginewright at the time of the 1861 Census but there is no further record of him or any members of his family to be found in subsequent censuses. It must be assumed, therefore, that either he emigrated or moved to Scotland.
(Note: The Scottish censuses have not been checked — 2006)

James married Mary Ann Fenwick, daughter of William Fenwick and Susannah Wilson, on 21 Aug 1841 in Heworth, Co. Durham 23.,24 Mary was born <1822> in Jarrow, Co. Durham and was baptised on 2 Oct 1822 in South Shields, Co. Durham.86

Children from this marriage were:

   35 F    i. Mary Hannah Clark 87 was born in 1842 in Jarrow, Co. Durham.87,88

   36 F    ii. Jane Clark 87 was born in 1843 in Jarrow, Co. Durham.87,89

   37 F    iii. Ann Eliza Clark 87 was born in 1846 in Jarrow, Co. Durham.87,90

13. Mary Ann Clark 26 was born in Portobello, Nr Birtley, Co. Durham 26 and was baptised on 2 Jul 1820 in St Mary's, Chester-le-Street, Co. Durham.26

Mary married John Loraine on 6 Aug 1842 in Heworth, Co. Durham. John was born <1821> in Scotland and died in 1845 in South Shields, Co. Durham at age 24.

General Notes: John was a journeyman joiner


Children from this marriage were:

   38 M    i. John Loraine 91 was born <1844> in Jarrow, Co. Durham.91

John married Isabella Maughan in 1864.92 Isabella was born <1845> in Northumberland.

   39 F    ii. Hannah Loraine 91 was born <1845> in Framwellgate, Co. Durham.91

Hannah married Christopher Bell, son of [William?] Bell and Mabel ———, in 1861 in Morpeth, Northumberland.93 Christopher was born <1840> in Percy, Northumberland.

   40 M    iii. James Clark Loraine 91 was born in 1846 in Jarrow, Co. Durham.91

James married Mary Ann Wilson in 1864 in Morpeth, Northumberland.94 Mary was born <1845> in Bedlington, Northumberland.

   41 M    iv. Joseph Loraine 91 was born <1848> in Jarrow, Co. Durham.91

Mary next married John Scott in 1852 in Gateshead, Co. Durham 27.,28 John was born <1801> in Tanfield, Co. Durham and died in 1880 in Bedlington, Northumberland at age 79.

General Notes: John was a coalminer.


The child from this marriage was:

   42 F    i. Sarah Ann Scott 91 was born <1858> in Jarrow, Co. Durham.91

Sarah married James Haig in 1876 in Morpeth, Northumberland.95 James was born <1853> in Dunbar, Scotland.

15. William Clark was born <1827> in Durham.

William married Ann Thompson on 15 Apr 1849 in Heworth, Co. Durham 21.,30 Ann was born <1830> in Jarrow, Co. Durham.

The child from this marriage was:

   43 M    i. William Patterson was born <1852> in Morpeth, Northumberland. (Adopted)

16. John Clark was born on 6 Feb 1811 in Fatfield, Co. Durham,44 was baptised on 3 Mar 1811 in St Mary's, Chester-le-Street, Co. Durham,45 died on 11 Oct 1899 in Blyth Cottage, Millfield, Sunderland 46,47 at age 88, and was buried on 13 Oct 1899 in Bishopwearmouth Cemetery, Chester Road, Sunderland.48

General Notes: John was the least successful of William's surviving sons. Being the eldest son it might be expected that he would have inherited any business that his father had built up at the Cross Street workshop off Farrington Row. However, whatever business was done there in the 1830s seems to have ceased by the time his father died, probably, because it was John and his brothers who did most of the work and they had moved on by then. So John and his brothers had to make their own way.

It is not known what John did immediately after ceasing to work for his father but later during the period 1840-43 he ran a business with his brothers in Wellington Lane, called John Clark & Co which made steam engines for collieries and pumping stations. This business seems to have foundered, perhaps, because of the economic depression which occurred in the early 1840's and it was taken over in October 1843 by a William Herring who placed an announcement in the local paper stating that he was keeping it going.

There cannot have been many opportunities in Sunderland in the 1840s for engineers like the Clarks because John took himself and his family to London and found work as an engineer in Stepney probably in a local foundry. The family appears to have returned to Sunderland sometime in the mid-1850s.

There is no indication in any surviving records that John was involved with any other business ventures and for the rest of his life he appears to have worked for others. Who they were, is not known but, possibly, in later years he might have worked for his brother, George. Certainly, he described himself in successive Censuses as an "engineer" (1851), "engine fitter"(1861), "engine wright" (1871) and "retired engineer" (1881), hardly the occupations one would give if one was the proprietor of a business.

John does, however, seem to have enjoyed good health or at least a long life; he survived all his brothers, including his much younger half-brother, William, by a large margin, living as he did to 88. His brother Thomas dying at 61, his brother George at 69 and William at 46. 96,97,98,99

Some things about his life were:

• Report of death: 31 Oct 1899, Sunderland, Co. Durham. 100 The Sunderland Daily Echo reported John's death in its "Local Paragraphs" on Friday October 13, 1899:-

The death is announced of Mr. John Clark, brother of the late G. W. Clark, founder of the Southwick Engine Works. He was 88 years of age.

• Will signed: 17 Jan 1899, Sunderland, Co. Durham. 101 John's estate consisted mainly of buildings. He left 15 Hawthorn Street, Sunderland to his son William as well as the income from two houses, 6 & 7 Milburn Street, Sunderland, during William's life time and on his death they were to pass to (William's) daughters Ellen Flannigan (wife of Peter Flannigan) and Polly Clark.

John Clark Letbe (John's grandson) witnessed the Will and gave his address as 1 Granville Street, Sunderland which is where John was living in 1871.

• Probate Granted: 19 Oct 1899, Durham. 102 Effects: £335

John married Isabella Jolly, daughter of Joseph Jolly and Mary Blythe, on 11 Jul 1831 in St Peter's Church, Monkwearmouth, Co. Durham.49 Isabella was born in Feb 1813 in Houghton-le-Spring, Co. Durham,103 was baptised on 6 Mar 1813 in St Michael, Houghton-le-Spring, Co. Durham,104 and died in 1890 in Sunderland, Co. Durham 105 at age 77.

Children from this marriage were:

+ 44 F    i. Dorothy Clark was born in 1833 in Farrington Row, Bishopwearmouth, Co. Durham,103 was baptised on 9 Jul 1833 in St Michael's Church, Bishopwearmouth,106 and died in 1899 in Sunderland, Co. Durham at age 66.

   45 F    ii. Mary Anne Clark was born on 29 May 1836 in Bishopwearmouth, Co. Durham, was baptised on 22 Jun 1836 in St Michael's Church, Bishopwearmouth,108 and died in 1837 in Sunderland, Co. Durham 109 at age 1.

+ 46 F    iii. Isabella Clark was born in 1839 in Millfield, Bishopwearmouth, Co. Durham,103 was baptised on 3 Feb 1839 in St Michael's Church, Bishopwearmouth,110 and died in 1897 in Sunderland, Co. Durham 111 at age 58.

   47 F    iv. Mary Elizabeth Clark was born in 1840 in Millfield, Bishopwearmouth, Co. Durham,103 was baptised on 1 Jul 1840 in St Michael's Church, Bishopwearmouth,113 and died in 1841 in Sunderland, Co. Durham 114 at age 1.

+ 48 M    v. William Clark was born <1842> in Deptford Terrace, Bishopwearmouth, Co. Durham and was baptised on 8 Feb 1843 in St Michael's Church, Bishopwearmouth.115

17. Thomas Clark was born on 4 May 1812 in Harraton-out-Side, Co. Durham,44 was baptised on 4 Oct 1812 in St Mary's, Chester-le-Street, Co. Durham,50 died on 5 Aug 1873 in Ravenswood, North Elswick, Newcastle-upon-Tyne 51,52 at age 61, and was buried in Elswick Cemetery, Newcastle upon Tyne.53

General Notes: Thomas seems to have spent all of his working life in the iron foundry business having, in all probability, learnt that trade as an apprentice at the Bishopwearmouth Ironworks which was near where he lived from the age of 13 and where, reputedly, his father was at one time the manager.

It seems likely that Thomas spent his early years working either for the Bishopwearmouth Ironworks or for his father's engine business at Cross Street off Farrington Row. Building steam engines required cylinders, pistons, connection rods, etc., to be cast and unless it was subcontracted, Thomas's father's business would have needed someone to carry out this work at the Cross Street workshop. However, given the size of those premises it is probably more likely that any large components were cast elsewhere. Whatever the case, Thomas was living in Farrington Row during the early 1830s as both his sons were born there and his occupation on their baptismal entries in the parish records is given as "Ironfounder".

Some time after 1837 he moved from Farrington Row to a house in Deptford Lane where we find him and his family at time of the 1841 Census living only a few houses away from his newly married brother George; he was still reported as being there in a 1844 directory and it is fairly certain that during the period 1840 to 1843 he was working with his brothers in the firm of John Clark & Co. in Wellington Lane. This firm is described as being "Millwrights and Engine Builders" but the business was carried out at the Wellington Lane Foundry so Thomas's skills as a founder would have been utilised. When the business was taken over, for whatever reason, by William Herring in October 1843 the foundry was renamed "Ayres Quay Foundry" and it survived under that name for another 20 years or more.

After the demise of John Clark & Co, the brothers split up. The economic situation in Sunderland at that time cannot have been very good because none of the Clark brothers attempted to start a new business for some years but that may have been partly due to the fallout from the failure of their Wellington Lane venture. Thomas's brother John went off to find work in London and Thomas went to Gateshead where we find him living with his family in 1851, working as an iron founder's agent; presumably, finding work for the various iron foundries there.

By 1855 he had been able to establish an iron foundry of his own in Low Elswick to the West of Newcastle very near the River Tyne. This enterprise clearly flourished as in the next 18 years Thomas and Ann gradually moved from a very small house down near the Tyne up through Elswick to a fine house in Westgate Road in North Elswick.

Thomas Clark & Co employed Thomas's two sons in the early 1860s but for a while they went off to start a Copperas (ferrous sulphate) manufacturing business returning, presumably when Thomas, senior, was wishing to take things more easily, c.1870. About this time, Thomas Clark & Co started to manufacture steam engines at its Low Elswick works.

Thomas died at Ravenswood, his house in Westgate Road, aged 61, leaving what in those days was comfortable "fortune". His wife, Ann, continued to live there for another 20 years. 69,118,119,120,121,122

Some things about his life were:

• Probate Granted: 11 Sep 1873, Newcastle upon Tyne, Northumberland. 123 Effects under £25,000

Thomas married Ann Robson, daughter of Thomas Robson and Margaret ———, on 15 Dec 1833 in Monkwearmouth, Co. Durham. Ann was born on 22 Apr 1815 in Sunderland, Co. Durham,124 was baptised on 5 May 1815 in Bishopwearmouth, Co. Durham,125 died on 2 Mar 1908 in Newcastle upon Tyne, Northumberland 52,126,127 at age 92, and was buried in Elswick Cemetery, Newcastle upon Tyne.53

General Notes: The picture shown for Ann is taken from a photograph on which it is written "Aunt Clark". The photograph came from a collection that had once belonged to Ann Lockie Vaux (née Clark). Ann Lockie Vaux had three aunts, two of whom lived in Newcastle. One was this Ann and the other was Elizabeth Clark (née Potter) who was married to Ann Lockie Vaux's uncle, William Clark, her father's half-brother. The person in this picture bears a strong resemblance to John Robson Clark (see his pictures) who was Ann's great grandson so there seems every likelihood that this picture is indeed of Ann Clark.

Some things about her life were:

• Will: 16 Jul 1901, Newcastle upon Tyne, Northumberland. 128 Appointed as Executors and Trustees:-
Thomas Cooke of Newcastle upon Tyne, Banker, Thomas Abbott Rycroft of Bensham Lodge, Gateshead and George Gavin Laidler, the younger, of 40 Northumberland Street, Newcastle upon Tyne.

Left the following legacies:-

To her grandchildren:-
Walter William Blakey Clark - £250
Kate Annabell Nicholson the wife of John James Nicholson - £250
Margaret Jane Marian Clark - £250
Thomas Clark of Durban, Natal - £1000

To her brother John Thomas Robson of No. 36 Cumberland Street, Pimlico, London - £250.
To Thomas Cooke (Executor) - £175
To her grand daughter-in-law Ione Clark of No. _ Waterford Crescent, Whitley - £500 in trust for her great grandsons, John Robson Clark and Robert Sharp Clark.

Bequeathed her 'wearing apparel and jewellery' to Kate Annabell Nicholson and Margaret Jane Marian Clark in equal shares.

Of the residue of her estate, she left in trust half to her son James Clark and half to her grandson Thomas Clark on condition that Thomas paid his father, Thomas Robson Clark ("TRC"), during his life time the weekly sum of £1. If Thomas Clark did not survive her then his share was to be split equally between the surviving children of TRC, with the weekly sum still being payable to TRC.

The Executors were specifically exonerated from seeing that the weekly sum was paid to TRC!

Advances she had made to her son James (£700 without interest) and to her grandson, Thomas, (£1,100 with interest at ‘four pounds per centum per annum’) and any other advances she might make, were to be taken in to account in any amounts paid to them from her estate.

• Probate Granted: 14 Apr 1908, Newcastle upon Tyne, Northumberland. 129 Effects: £15040 9s 2d

Children from this marriage were:

+ 49 M    i. James Clark was born in Farrington Row, Bishopwearmouth, Co. Durham,130 was baptised on 26 Oct 1834 in St Michael's Church, Bishopwearmouth,131 died on 9 Aug 1909 in Newcastle upon Tyne, Northumberland 52,132 at age 74, and was buried in Elswick Cemetery, Newcastle upon Tyne.53

+ 50 M    ii. Thomas Robson Clark was born in 1837 in Farrington Row, Bishopwearmouth, Co. Durham 130 and was baptised on 15 Jan 1837 in St Michael's Church, Bishopwearmouth.134


19. George Clark was born on 25 Sep 1815 in Fatfield, Co. Durham,55 was baptised on 8 Oct 1815 in St Mary's, Chester-le-Street, Co. Durham,136 died on 15 Jan 1885 in Oak Lea, Sunderland, Co. Durham 57 at age 69, and was buried on 19 Jan 1885 in Bishopwearmouth Cemetery, Chester Road, Sunderland.58

General Notes: There is no doubt that George had very considerable engineering ability and great commercial flair; he also was fortunate to have chosen, by good luck or good judgment, to establish the firm of George Clark & Co at a time of great transition in the shipbuilding industry on the River Wear.

Up until 1852 the River Wear's fine reputation for shipbuilding had been based on sailing ships of wooden construction built mainly by small shipyards (there were 70 of these in 1851) so the announcement in May 1851 that George was building an iron ship caused considerable interest. With the launching of this small schooner, "The Loftus", in February 1852 George and his partners, the Derwent Iron Co., who made the plates, and John Barkes on whose slipway at Wreath Quay it was built, demonstrated that there were the materials and expertise in Sunderland to make iron-hulled ships.

A few other shipbuilders on the Wear began to build iron ships but there was no rush to change. Shipbuilders on Wear, perhaps because of their prestigious position in the shipbuilding world and their heritage of small shipyards, were slow to embrace the new material and technology compared with their rivals on Tyne and it took another 20 years before wooden shipbuilding gave way completely to iron shipbuilding on the Wear. In the course of that change most of the small yards disappeared through not having the capital to invest in new technology or the space, in terms of river frontage, to exploit it.

In the same year, or perhaps a year later, George built two engines which were the first ones made locally to be used to power a steamship built on the Wear (his father, had been the first person to build steam engines locally for Wear river craft; but these were for tugboats). These were used in the SS Alfred which was built by James Laing's yard. The success of this vessel and, of course, others from shipbuilding yards around the country, encouraged the use of steam power in ships and George was most successful in capitalising on the growing demand for marine steam engines.

George was fortunate on two other counts. First, economic activity on the Wear had picked up considerably by 1849 after the severe downturn in 1840 with its nadir in 1843 (possibly the cause of the collapse of his brother's firm in that year) and remained at a satisfactory level for about the next 20 years. Secondly, in the early days of his business, marine engine building being then a relatively new industry, he was not much troubled by organised labour but this factor did cause the business considerable problems later as it did all the manufacturers on the Wear. It is ironic that the large turnout of workers at George's funeral in January 1885 was due, in part, to the fact that many of the employees at the Southwick Works were on strike at that time.

George's obituary suggests that he was the "father" of iron-hulled ships and marine engines on the Wear. Certainly, he was a leading engine builder on the River and he was fortunate in being selected to make the engines for the SS Albert, doubtless there were others who could have made similar engines as there were a number of engine builders in the Sunderland area at the time. Moreover, the construction of The Loftus may have been his idea but George Forster, of the Derwent Iron Co., did have enough faith in the ship's design to commission it and without the help of John Barkes, George would have had difficulty in constructing it. Very possibly, it was George with his experience of iron production who saw the potential of building iron sided ships and persuaded the others to support the venture; we shall never know but, without doubt, George does rightly deserve proper recognition for these two historic innovations on the Wear.

George appears not to have been involved in local politics or civic activity. It has been suggested that George's lack of interest in this area was due to his ill health — he suffered from asthma for many years. This may be correct but it is also possible that like many first generation entrepreneurs he was steadfastly focused on his businesses and saw no point in being distracted into peripheral activities such as being on the local council or a JP. He left that to the next generation. It may also be because George was, essentially, a very modest and private man who had neither the tradition nor the wish to exercise power in the local community even though his position as a large employer of labour entitled him to do so.

When he died in 1885, George left about £253,000 which equates to probably £16.1 million in today's money (2002). Apart from building his Oak Lea residence in Tunstall Road, he does not seem to have spent any money on grandiose projects and his Will is one of a man who wishes to ensure that the businesses which he has diligently created are properly nurtured by the next generation. 137,138,139

Some things about his life were:

• Education: Bet 1823 and 1834, Sunderland, Co. Durham. Nothing is known about George's education though it safe to assume that he left school at an early age, probably around 14 years of age, and served an engineering apprenticeship working for his father.

• Occupation: Bet 1835 and 1839, Bishopwearmouth, Co. Durham. 140 Unfortunately, George is not mentioned in any surviving Directories until 1847 and the various accounts of his career during this period are rather vague.

It seems that the engine building business that had been carried on at his father's workshop in Cross Street had petered out by c.1835/1836 but it may be, as has been suggested in various reports, that he served his early apprenticeship in that business.

However, it is thought that by this time his father was managing the Bishopwearmouth Iron Works, so it is quite likely that he worked there because he was later appointed to as the first engineer at the newly created Consett Iron Works and it is unlikely that he would have been chosen for that role if he had not had some prior engineering experience in a large iron works.

• Occupation: Bet 1840 and 1843, Deptford, Bishopwearmouth. 141 For a short period George joined his eldest brother's engineering firm, John Clark & Co which had its works in Wellington Lane, Ayres Quay, Sunderland and which was known as the Wellington Lane Foundry. Unfortunately for one reason or another, this firm ceased trading in 1843 and the business was taken over by a Mr William Herring in October of that year.

• Occupation: Bet 1843 and 1849, Derwentside, Co. Durham. 141 George's obituary (see later) in the Sunderland Daily Echo says that after he left John Clark and Co., when it ceased trading in October 1843, he was employed at Consett for six years as the first engineer at the newly established Consett Iron Works.

Since the middle of the 17th century Shotley Bridge in the Derwent Valley had been renowned as a centre for sword making and it is thought that the source of iron ore in the district had been one of the reasons why the original sword makers had settled there. In 1837 significant deposits of iron ore had been found in the hills to the south east of Shotley Bridge and in 1840 a company, known as the Derwent Iron Co., was created to exploit them. Initially, it built two blast furnaces at a site near the then village of Berry Edge and Consett Hall. On this site grew the Consett Iron Works which later became one of the largest producers of iron in the country and Berry Edge and much of the surrounding countryside disappeared into the township of Consett.

Some time in the early 1840s the Derwent Iron Co. acquired the Bishopwearmouth Ironworks, where George's father was reputed to have been the Manager for many years. In time, the Derwent Iron Co. changed its name to the Consett Iron Co.

When George left the Derwent Iron Co., one of the first projects which he embarked upon was the building of the first iron-hulled ship on the River Wear (see later) which was commissioned by George Forster who was then the Manager of the Derwent Iron Co. George Forster had been a friend of George's father and, no doubt, it was through him that George obtained the post of engineer at the Consett works.

Whether or not George spent all his time at the Consett works is not known but presumably because the Iron Works were in a period of initial growth, he would have been needed there rather than in Sunderland. In those early days there can have been little suitable accommodation for a burgeoning family in the Consett area so it is not surprising that Jane and the children remained in Sunderland during those years.

• Occupation: Bet 1849 and 1885, Sunderland, Co. Durham. 142,143,144,145,146,147,148 A Directory of 1850 lists George with "engine works on North Quay, Monkwearmouth". To be in that Directory George must have had an engine works in operation by 1849 (some report it as 1848) which is probably the year that he ceased to work for the Derwent Iron Co.

For the next 35 years or so, George developed an increasingly successful engine and boiler manufacturing business. Initially, this was based in Hay Street, Monkwearmouth but it soon expanded into nearby premises in Stobart Street. Eventually, the business had grown so large that new premises to be found. The Company first moved its boiler making operations to a site in Deptford and later purchased an old shipyard in Low Southwick to which it moved the engineering works in 1872. The Company remained at these latter premises for 95 years and the sight of the large travelling crane with the sign "Geo.Clark & Co" emblazoned high upon it became a familiar Sunderland landmark.

George is credited with building the engines which were installed in the first steam driven ship built on the River Wear. The ship was the "Alfred" and it was built by Mr James Laing; it was afterwards sold to the British government for use as a transport vessel in the Crimean War.

In the days of the Stobart Street works, George Clark lived at, and ran the business from, No. 14 North Bridge Road, Monkwearmouth which was only a short distance from the Works. In 1859 George and his family moved over the river to Bishopwearmouth and, presumably, No. 14 was then used as a work's office until George Clark, jun. moved in there after he was married in 1865. (George Clark, jun., is reputed to have taken over the day-to-day management of the firm in 1861, because of his father's ill health). No. 14 remained the home of George Clark, jun., until c.1872 — the writer's grandmother was born in No. 14 in 1869 — when he moved to Thornhill Terrace, near his father's newly built property, Oak Lea; this was about the time that the Clark Engine Works moved to Low Southwick so No. 14 was no longer convenient.

George, sen., having lived in one or two houses in the fashionable new residential areas of Bishopwearmouth, eventually built himself a grand house in Tunstall Road. The house, Oak Lea, was completed in 1872 and George lived in it until he died in 1885 after which it was sold and became a boarding house for Roman Catholic girls being educated in Sunderland. It still belonged to the same religious order in 2001 but now provides residential accommodation for the elderly.

When George was just beginning to establish himself in Monkwearmouth he dabbled briefly with shipbuilding having received a commission from George Forster, Manager of the Derwent Iron Co., for a small iron schooner. He and a shipbuilder called John Barkes built this schooner with iron plates provided by the Derwent Iron Co. and, in all probability made the old Bishopwearmouth Iron Works, and she was launched in February 1852. "The Loftus", as she was known, was the first ship with an iron hull to be built on the River Wear; she is said to have been used by the Derwent Iron Co. to ship iron ore from the Cleveland Hills to Hartlepool. George is suppose to have had further commissions to build iron-hulled ships but whether or not any of these were ever actually constructed, is not known. Suffice it to say that he seems to have concentrated on engine building thereafter or at least for the next 20 years.

George eventually expanded into ship ownership in the early 1870s. He did this by going into partnership with a member of a well-established ship-owning and shipbroking family in Sunderland, thereby creating the firm of Culliford & Clark & Co. Initially, Culliford & Clark had offices in Sunderland and London but later its operations extended to other major English ports. The new partnership seems to have coincided with his son, John, going to work for Culliford & Clark in London so whether George entered into this partnership purely on commercial grounds or partly because he wanted to find a suitable occupation for his younger sons (his youngest son, Frederick, was also briefly employ in the firm) is debatable. However, as he was a remarkably successful businessman, it is unlikely that he joined forces with Culliford other than to diversify and make a profit. When he died, he left his shipping interests solely to his son John who made a very great success of them.

During most of his adult life, George suffered from asthma which gave him more and more trouble as the years went on. It is unlikely to have been the direct cause of his death but no doubt it weakened him and aggravated any respiratory infections.

Because of this ailment, he appears to have handed over the day-to-day running of the Engine Works to his eldest son George in c.1861, as soon as the latter was able to take on the responsibility. George was later joined by Henry, who, it is said, was persuaded to give up a career in law in London to join the George Clark & Co. management because George,sen., was very concerned about George, jun.'s, ability to run the Company successfully single-handed.

Nevertheless, when he died George, sen., gave George, jun., overall control of the businesses with his other sons, William and Henry as managers at the Southwick Engine Works and John as manager of his shipping interests.

• Will: 19 Feb 1883, Sunderland, Co. Durham. 149,150 As one might expect of an astute and successful businessman, George made a complex Will running to ten tightly written pages. The Will created several trusts and is interesting because it imposed various restrictions on the beneficiaries that clearly reflected the concerns George had about some of his children and grandchildren.

He appointed as his executors and trustees his sons, George, William, John and Henry. Peter who, as will be seen later, he clearly regarded as irresponsible and his youngest son Frederick were not included. In 1883 Frederick would have only recently attained 21 years of age and was probably deemed too young and inexperienced to be included; he had yet to make himself persona non grata with the family by running off with Jane Clark, the wife of his brother John.

George gave each of his three daughters, Ann, Kate and Dora £500 (not £30,000 as has been reported elsewhere) and set up a £30,000 trust fund in which they each had a one-third share of the income. This trust fund had to be created from George's assets most of which were tied up in his various businesses so the Trustees were allowed to pay an income not exceeding £1200 pa from those businesses until such time as an amount of £30,000 could prudently be realised. This meant that each daughter could receive up to £400 pa. This was quite a generous sum in those days - approximately £25,000 pa in 2002 money - particularly, for Kate and Dora who were married by the time George died. It was probably not so good for Ann because she had left her husband, Cuthbert Vaux, some years earlier and was living on her own.

Ann's right to her share of the income from the £30,000 trust fund was made "upon the express condition that she shall not at any time hereafter return to cohabitation with her late [ex] husband Cuthbert Vaux". Whether or not Ann needed such an incentive is not known (she and Cuthbert had been divorced in 1881) but she never did return to Cuthbert. Another condition applied to Ann's share of the trust fund; on her death, all of her children with the exception of Jane Clark Vaux were entitled to benefit from her share of the fund. It is not known why Jane was excluded perhaps George thought that she would be well enough provided for following her marriage to Daniel Gillies in 1882; in the event it did not prove to be a successful marriage.

George left "my old nurse Sarah Christie" an annuity of £30 for her life. Sarah could not have been George's old nurse as she was about five years younger than him but she had been a member of the Clark household for many years probably from as early as 1861 when Frederick was born.

George directed that his Trustees "shall continue to carry on business of an Engine Builder now carried out by me at Southwick and Sunderland aforesaid and every other business which I shall be carrying on all engaged in at the time of my decease until the expiration of three years from the date of my decease..." He put his eldest son George in overall charge of all his businesses with William and Henry as managers of the Southwick Engine Works and John as manager of the shipping business.

George's residual estate, which comprised the businesses mentioned above after the various legacies had been paid and the trust fund of £30,000 set up, was to be held in trust for all of his six surviving sons. There was a caveat regarding Peter's share which was to be held by the Trustees for "the term of his natural life or until he shall attempt to charge alien incumber or otherwise dispose of the said income or part thereof..." Clearly, Peter was not to be trusted with any capital! Indeed, reports of Peter's lifestyle (see his Notes for details) show that George had every right to be cautious about entrusting any of the family fortune to him.

Footnote:
The Trustees did carry on George's businesses for the three years he stipulated in his Will and then in September 1889 in an agreement between all the surviving brothers and the executors of William's estate (William had died in 1887), George Clark & Co became a limited company with the family members as it is only shareholders. George and Henry became joint managing directors and John became the only other director; these appointments were to be for life. Peter and Frederick both received substantial tranches of the debentures and ordinary shares, so it seems that the wishes of George, sen., in respect of Peter were circumvented. In fact, Peter died 13 years later leaving his share more or less intact.

What happened to George, sen.'s, interest in the firm of Culliford & Clark is unclear; it seems to have been taken over by John at some stage who then went on to make a considerable success of it.

• Obituary: 15 Jan 1885, Sunderland, Co. Durham. 141 The Sunderland Daily Echo reported George's death in on 15th January 1885: -

DEATH OF MR GEORGE CLARK, SENIOR

We regret to have to announce the death of Mr George Clark, sen., engineer, which took place at his residence, Oak Lea Villa, Tunstall Road, this morning. The deceased gentleman had reached the advanced age of 69, and his death marks the removal of one who played an important part in the industrial enterprise of Sunderland. His was a busy life, and before it close he had the satisfaction of developing one of the largest private engineering concerns in the country. For the long period of forty years he had been very much troubled with asthma. His ailment had not recently displayed any very dangerous tendencies until about ten days ago, when he became seriously unwell. He was attended in his last illness by Dr Phillipson, of Newcastle, and Dr Maling, of Sunderland, who administered such relief as was within their skill and power. At four o'clock this morning, however, Mr Clark passed peacefully away. The deceased gentleman was born at Fatfield, in the County of Durham, in the year 1815 and was the son of Mr Wm. Clark, who was for many years manager of the Bishopwaremouth Ironworks. The deceased, in fact, belonged to an old Sunderland family. Like his father, he was an engineer. With his high aims and endeavours he had solid practical knowledge and experience, and these he applied successfully for the carrying out of the great purposes of his life. He was one of the pioneers of the commerce of Sunderland, one who, by his ability, perseverance, and engineering skill, did more for the material welfare of the borough than can be easily and clearly expressed. When comparatively a young man he was a member of the firm of Clark Brothers, who carried on an extensive business in the Wellington lane, known as the Wellington Iron Works. He afterwards went to Consett, as engineer to the Consett Iron Works. He was the first engineer to the company whose extensive works now produce more material than any other in Great Britain. On relinquishing this post he started business on the North Quay, Sunderland. He built the Monkwearmouth Engine Works in the year 1851, and twenty years afterwards commenced the erection of the Southwick Engine Works, whose dimensions maybe calculated when it is stated that they can employ a thousand men when in full swing. When the position which Sunderland now occupies as an important shipbuilding and marine engine manufacturing town are considered, it is interesting to note that Mr George Clark initiated iron shipbuilding on the Wear. The first iron vessel constructed on the river, the Loftus, was built by the deceased, and was launched about the year 1851. He was likewise the "father" of marine engine building on the river, the first engine being built in the same year as the Loftus. The deceased was therefore identified with the beginning of three important industries, the shipbuilding and engineering manufacture of Sunderland and the iron manufacture at Consett. He took no part in public affairs, a fact probably owing to his prolonged ill-health. In politics he was a modern Liberal, and in religion he was a Churchman. The deceased leaves a family of sons and daughters.

• Funeral: 19 Jan 1855, Sunderland, Co. Durham. Sunderland Daily Echo, Tuesday 20th January, 1885

Funeral of the late Mr George Clark, senior

Yesterday, the remains of the late Mr Geo. Clark, sen., engineer, were removed from the residence of the deceased, Oak Lea Villa, Tunstall Road, and interred in Bishopwearmouth Cemetery. A considerable number of people had gathered in the vicinity of the house to see the funeral cortege move away, among them being some of the present workmen of Mr Clark, and not a few of the engineers who are out on strike. The mourning chaise, containing the Venerable Archdeacon Long, Dr. Maling and Mr T. Steel, came first, then followed the hearse, and following it the mourning coaches were occupied as follows:- 1st carriage, Mr George Clark, Mr William Clark, and Mr John Clark; 2nd, Mr P. Clark, Mr Henry Clark, and Mr John Clark; 3rd, Dr. Ayre Smith, Mr R. C. Thompson, Mr George Clark, jun., and Mr George Vaux; 4th, Mr James Clark, Mr Thomas R. Clark, Mr John Lockie, and Mr James Clark, jun.; 5th, Mr George Welch, Mr John Dickinson, Mr Culliford; 6th, Mr Robert Thompson, Mr G. E. Thompson, Mr H. H. Wake; 7th, Mr E. Wetherley, and Mr John Potts; 8th, Mr John Price, Mr Wm. Knott, Mr Henry Downie. Several other carriages containing workman succeeded; and these again were followed by a long row of private carriages and cabs, the total number of vehicles being nearly forty. The private carriages of the following gentleman were present:- Messrs R. M. Hudson, J. W. Wayman, Robert Thompson, J. E. Thompson, Dr. Maling, Dr. Welford, Wm. Black, John Price, D. G. Pinkney. A number of these gentlemen were present and also Captain Pinkney and Mr T. Pinkney. The arrangements for the funeral were carried out by Messrs Cowper and Moore. The coffin, which was made by Mr Henderson, Holmeside, was of polished oak with brass mountings, the leaden case inside it having been made by Mr D. Taylor, plumber. On the coffin was the following inscription:- George Clark, born 25th September, 1815; died 15th January, 1885.

• Probate Granted: 31 Mar 1885, Durham. 151 Left £252846 17s 2d

George married Jane Lockie, daughter of John Lockie and Agnes ———, on 14 Jul 1840 in St Peter's Church, Monkwearmouth, Co. Durham.59 Jane was born in 1819 in High Dock, Bishopwearmouth, Co. Durham, was baptised on 1 Jun 1819 in Spring Garden Lane Presbyterian Church, Sunderland,152 died on 27 Apr 1882 in Oak Lea, Sunderland, Co. Durham 153 at age 63, and was buried in Bishopwearmouth Cemetery, Chester Road, Sunderland.

Marriage Notes: Jane's father, John, was a blacksmith who kept various inns in the Ayres Quay district of Bishopwearmouth. When he was about 60, he gave up smithying and acquired a small brewery in Hanover Place. There was an inn next door to this brewery called the "George IV " which John's family may have run for a short while, certainly, his daughter Catherine and her husband ran it from the early 1840's.

Before taking on the brewery, John kept the "Dock House" tavern nearby. Both it and the "George IV" were only a short walk from Farrington Row and it would be nice to think that George regularly popped into one of these pubs after long, hard days in the workshop and had fallen for a pretty bar maid. The truth may be more prosaic but despite the unflattering photographs of Jane in later life after having borne George ten children, she had been a handsome woman in her youth, if the photograph of her eldest daughter, Ann, is any guide, and one can quite see why George was attracted to her. It was without doubt a love match. They were both quite young and from their respective families' points of view there cannot have been any special social or economic advantages in their marrying unlike the matches which some of their own children made.

Jane's and George's children all survived until they were at least 30 years of age and some, like John and Henry, lived into their 80s and 90s. In an era when many children died in infancy they did well to have such a survival rate and one or other of them, probably Jane whose father lived into his 80s, introduced a gene into the Clark family pool which produced several nonagenarians and even a centenarian amongst their grandchildren. 154

Children from this marriage were:

+ 51 F    i. Ann Lockie Clark was born on 30 May 1841 in Deptford, Bishopwearmouth, was baptised on 23 Jun 1841 in St Michael's Church, Bishopwearmouth, and died on 19 Nov 1926 in Dulwich, Surrey at age 85.

+ 52 M    ii. George Clark was born on 14 Jun 1843 in Farrington Row, Bishopwearmouth, Co. Durham, was baptised on 7 Jul 1843 in St Michael's Church, Bishopwearmouth, died on 4 Mar 1901 in Mentone, France at age 57, and was buried in Bishopwearmouth Cemetery, Chester Road, Sunderland.


   53 M    iii. William John Clark was born on 5 Dec 1847 in South Hylton, Co. Durham, died on 3 Feb 1887 in Hotel Métropôle, Bishopgate Street, London at age 39, and was buried on 7 Feb 1887 in Bishopwearmouth Cemetery, Chester Road, Sunderland.157

General Notes: William had considerable academic ability and was the first of this line of the Clark family to go to a university. Where in Sunderland he was prepared for such an academic education is not known but he won a scholarship at St John's College, Cambridge, and followed that by obtaining a first-class honours degree in the Mathematics Tripos.

After he left Cambridge in 1872 it is very likely that he joined an engineering firm to learn the practical side of boiler making & engine building. The 1881 Census shows him living in Ely Street, Gateshead with his wife Lydia and it is, therefore, probable that he was working at an engineering firm nearby; he gave his occupation as that of an "engine builder".

We do not know who William worked for in those days but it might well have been the firm of Clarke & Chapman¹ who had an engine works at the Victoria Works, St James Street.

Sometime about 1883 William went back to live in Sunderland and started to work in the firm of Geo. Clark & Co. Sadly, his health began to fail and one suspects that he never really had an opportunity to contribute to the family business even though his father had appointed him & his brother Henry as managers under their eldest brother George.

Certainly, after his father's death in 1885, his health deteriorated to the extent that he and his wife left Sunderland in search of a healthier environment. For part of 1886 they lived in Bournemouth (William made his Will there in June of that year) & later went to live in London (presumably to seek medical treatment) where William eventually died in 1887, at the early age of 39, at a hotel not far from Liverpool Street railway station.

After William's singular success at Cambridge, his subsequent career and private life must have seemed, to those who knew him well, to have been one of unfulfilled promise; he never lived long enough to make his mark in business or public affairs and he and his wife were not able to have any children.


¹ The firm of Clarke & Chapman was founded by William Clarke, who as far as it is known, was no relation of the Clarks of Sunderland. William Clarke was an engineer who had worked for the famous Armstrong company in Elswick and had then started up on his own account in Gateshead in the 1860s. About 1874 a Captain William Chapman joined him as a partner in the firm (as it did, for short while, Charles Parsons of steam turbine fame) and the firm went from strength to strength manufacturing engines, boilers, then crane equipment & later auxiliary marine equipment. The company is one of the few companies in Gateshead to have survived from those times & is now (2005) a division of Rolls Royce PLC
158

Medical Notes: Suffered from Bright's Disease. Bright's disease was often used to describe all kidney diseases, but strictly speaking it is glomerulonephritis (nephritis marked by inflammation of the glomeruli of the kidney; characterized by a decreased production of urine and by the presence of blood and protein in the urine and by edema).

Some things about his life were:

• Education: Bet 1868 and 1872, Cambridge. 159 William went up to St John's College in May 1868 to read mathematics. He won a scholarship in 1871 and received his BA in 1872 , being 36th Wrangler (see below) in the mathematics tripos of that year. He received his MA in 1875.

Note on the Mathematics Tripos:
Sir Isaac Newton held the chair at Cambridge for over 30 years and gave the study of mathematics a unique position in the university. When the honours examination came into being in the 18th century, it was primarily mathematical. (It was called the tripos, after the three-legged stool used formerly at disputations; and candidates placed in the first class were known as wranglers from the style of argument at a disputation.) A classical tripos was instituted in 1824, and tripos in natural sciences and moral sciences were added in 1851.

• Will signed: 11 Jun 1886, Bournemouth, Dorset. 160 William left his "dear wife Lydia" all their household furniture, effects, &c., with the proviso that his books, paintings, pictures, photographs & prints should pass to his brother George on her death. William also set aside £8000 to be held in a trust from which Lydia was to have the income and, on her death, the trust capital was to pass to those nominated by her or to her next of kin.

William gave £500 to each of the following: his friend Henry Hay Wake, his brother George & his brother Henry.

All the rest of his estate was to be held in another trust, again by his brothers, George & Henry, and his wife was to have the income from this during her life or her widowhood. In the event of her remarrying her income from this trust was to be reduced to £100 pa. In that event or on her death, the assets of this trust (less of those needed to produce the annuity of £100) were to be divided equally between his brothers, George & John Lockie, and his sisters, Annie Lockie Vaux & Catherine Jane Smith, to be held in trust for their children but with a life interest in the income for themselves.

Interestingly enough the Will makes provision for the situation where George & John are declared bankrupt in order to protect their children's share of the trust. This may have been a standard provision at the time but it is not one that the writer of this account has seen before and it may, therefore, reflect the worries about such an event in the Clark family.

Three of William's siblings did not benefit from the division of his residue estate. They were: Henry, probably because he was not married at the time; Dora who was married to the shipbuilder, Richard Thompson, and who was, no doubt, thought to be well provided for financial; Frederick, who, having become entangled with his brother John's wife thereby causing their divorce, was considered persona non grata by the family.

• Obituary: 4 Feb 1887, Sunderland, Co. Durham. 161

DEATH OF MR W. J. CLARK

The death is recorded of Mr William John Clark which took place at the Hotel Metropole, London, yesterday afternoon. He was a son of the late Mr George Clark, of the Southwick Engineering Works. Mr Clark had been ill for over a year suffering from Bright's disease. He went to Bournemouth for the benefit of his health, staying there till the spring of last year. Subsequently he removed to the Hotel Metropole in London and continued to reside there with a slight intermission till his death at 2.30 yesterday afternoon in the presence of his brother, Mr George Clark, and other relatives.

The deceased gentleman was recently placed on the Commission of the Peace for the Borough of Sunderland but, owing to ill-health, never qualified. He was made a member of the Southwick School Board on its formation in January, 1874, and acted as vice-chairman until his retirement three years after that date. Mr Clark also took a prominent part in the founding of the Conservative Club at Monkwearmouth. He was 39 years of age and married but has left no family. The body will be brought to his residence in Park Terrace for internment at Sunderland.

• Funeral: 7 Feb 1887, Sunderland, Co. Durham. 162 Sunderland Daily Echo reported William's funeral as follows:-


FUNERAL OF MR WM. J. CLARK

This morning the remains of Mr W. J. Clark, son of the late Mr George Clark, were interred in Bishopwearmouth Cemetery. The corpse arrived from the Metropolitan Hotel, London, on Friday night, and was conveyed to the residence of the deceased, 8, Park terrace.

The cortege was arranged to leave at twelve o'clock today, but long before that hour large numbers of people began to congregate in the vicinity of the Park, and private carriages began to arrive with great frequency. The flag at the Conservative Club was flying half-mast, and, in most of the houses past which the procession went, the blinds were drawn. The following is a list of the chief mourners and the order in which the procession moved: -

Chaise: Rev. J. Caswell and Dr. Maling
First carriage: Mr George Clark, Mr P Clark, Mr J. Clark and Mr H. Clark.
Second carriage: Mr George Clark, jun., Mr J. Clark, Mr John Clark and Mr G. Vaux.
Third carriage: Mr Jas. Clark, Dr. Smith, Mr R. C. Thompson, and Mr J. Dickinson.
Fourth carriage: Mr H. H. Wake, Mr W. Gillies, Mr W. Dickinson, and Mr Welch.
Fifth carriage: Mr Culliford, Mr J. L. Thompson, Mr J. E. Thompson, and Mr P. Wood.
Sixth carriage: Mr J. Potts, Mr A. Potts, Mr E Weatherley, and Mr T. Steel.
Seventh carriage: Mr H. Downer, Mr W. Dent, Mr J. Rice, and Mr J. Tweedle.
Eighth carriage: Mr Warring and Mr Pulling

Then came a large number of the men employed at the engine works. The carriages of the following gentlemen joined the procession:- Mr J. E. Thompson, Mr Haggie, Mr J. Thompson, Mr W. Black, Mr S. P. Austin, Mr J. Y. Short, Mr J. Gordon, Mrs Wiener, and Drs. Maling, Morgan, Lambert, and Hopgood. A large number of gentlemen drove to the cemetery in hired cabs; and the ex-Mayor (Ald. Preston), Ald. Bell, Councillors Dix, Rickaby, Armitage, Mr Smyrke, and other local gentlemen also followed the remains to the cemetery, and in the streets en route there were many spectators. The arrangements were under the superintendence of Mr Henderson, of Holmeside, whilst the hearse and chaises were provided by Mr Peter Lockie. The coffin was made of English elm, highly polished, with heavy brass mountings and bore a shield with the following inscription:-

William John Clarke [sic]
Born 5th Dec. 1847
Died Feb. 3rd, 1887


The service at the grave was conducted by the Rev. Mr Caswell, Vicar of St Thomas's Church.

• Probate Granted: 25 May 1887, Durham. 163 Left £39882 19s 11d.

William married Lydia Lousia Dent,166 daughter of Thomas Dent and Dorothy Patton, on 26 Jul 1880 in Strand Register Office, London 164.,165 Lydia was born in 1853 in Trimdon, Co. Durham 167 and died on 21 Jan 1929 in 8 Westbourne Villas, Hove, Sussex 168 at age 76.

Marriage Notes: It is hard to see how William might have come to know Lydia other than as an employee in his household or in a local hostelry; perhaps she came to work for him as a housekeeper. In this connection it is interesting to note that Lydia gave the address of William's house in Gateshead (7 Ely Street) as her address at the time of her marriage, which seems to confirm the proposition that she had been living with William prior to their marriage either as his mistress, his housekeeper or both.

It is rather surprising that William, who was a very clever & well-educated man, should have married, in an era of considerable sensitivity about these matters, someone who was from such a different and much poorer background to his own, particularly as there seems to have been no moral imperative, in the form of a child in the offering, to force the issue. Maybe, William was rather a maverick in these matters but it would seem that he was sensitive enough about the marriage to arrange for it to take place in London with no family witnesses. From Lydia's point of view she did very well in terms of status and finance to marry William, though she did have a rather long widowhood. 154

General Notes: We know something about Lydia's family from her Will because she bequeathed some of her estate to her brother James, to the wife of her deceased brother Abraham and to various nieces and nephews. She was the second child of Thomas and Dorothy Dent of Trimdon & Thornley. Thomas worked in the Trimdon colliery — he had been born in Trimdon — and then some years later at one in Thornley in various capacities ending up as a cartman. In her teens Lydia was a general servant for a printer in the village of Elvet near Durham and later, probably, came to work for William in some household capacity before she married him. (See marriage notes).

At sometime she adopted the additional name Louisa, perhaps at William's behest, because when her father registered her birth she was simply given the forename Lydia. The name Louisa appears first in the register entry of her marriage to William. Additionally, there is some vagueness about her age throughout her life but whether this was by design or simply carelessness it is difficult to say: her marriage certificate, shows her as 23 years of age but barely a year later it is recorded in the 1881 census, correctly, as being 27; in the 1901 census it is reported as 45 and finally it is given as 80 when she died in 1929. She was at that time about 75½ years old.

Lydia had as a companion for many years a woman, called Sarah Vaux, whom she would have got to know through the Clark family. Sarah was the daughter of Ralph & Isabella Vaux. Ralph was an ironmonger in Sunderland and was a brother of Cuthbert Vaux who married, and was later divorced by, William Clark's sister Ann.

It is quite likely that Sarah became Lydia's companion quite soon after William died because no trace of either of them can be found in the 1891 census which probably indicates that they were abroad at that time. By 1901 they were living together in Kensington and later they moved to Hove where they were when Lydia died. Lydia made significant provisions for Sarah in her Will. 169,170,171,172

Some things about her life were:

• Will signed: 24 Mar 1928, Hove, Sussex. 172 Lydia appointed her nephews William Clark & George Clark Smith to be her executors and trustees and left them 100 guineas each for their pains. It's interesting that Lydia, despite her perhaps rather uneasy situation vis-à-vis the Clark family, chose these two nephews by marriage to handle her affairs; obviously she had remained in touch with some parts of the Clark family.

These were her bequests:

1. She gave some items of particular value or interest (a grand piano, a large electroplated tray and a diamond and sapphire brooch) to her sister-in-law Mary Ann Dent and to her friend and companion Sarah Ann Vaux.
2. She directed that £5,000 be set aside and invested by her trustees for the benefit of Sarah Vaux during her lifetime which on Sarah's death was to come back to her estate as part of its residue. She also directed that Sarah Vaux was to have the use during her life of all her silver table services, etc., which were to be divided between her nieces, the daughters of Mary Ann Dent, on Sarah's death.
3. She gave her brother James the sum of £4000, which, in the event of him predeceasing her, was to go to his wife Cissie for her life and then to his daughter Olive.
4. She gave £500 each to her nephews William John Pink and Alfred Henry Pink [the sons of her sister Adelaide]
5. All the rest of her estate, after all expenses had been paid, she directed should be held by the trustees for the benefit of Mary Ann Dent during her lifetime with the capital being divided between Mary Ann's surviving daughters on her death.

Some time later in November 1928, she executed a codicil to this Will directing that Sarah Vaux should be allowed to choose enough furniture from her house to furnish a flat, bungalow or small house of four rooms (she had previously directed that Sarah should have the furniture and other contents of the bedroom that she used in No 8 Westbourne Villas, Hove where they lived). She also increased the capital amount that was to be set aside in trust for Sarah's benefit from £5,000 to £6,500.

• Probate Granted: 10 Apr 1929, London. 173 Grant to William Clark and George Clark Smith. Effects: £18,256 5s 7d. Resworn: £18,452 17s 1d

   54 M    iv. Thomas Clark was born on 18 Sep 1849 in Nile Street, Bishopwearmouth, Co. Durham,174,175 was baptised on 27 Sep 1849, died on 14 Feb 1880 in Sunderland, Co. Durham 176,177 at age 30, and was buried in Bishopwearmouth Cemetery, Chester Road, Sunderland.178

General Notes: There is no mention of a Thomas in the Clark family at the time of the 1851 Census but there is a Stephen who is one year old at that time. This age fits in with Thomas's date of birth. Whether the name Stephen was a mistake on George Clark's part when he completed the Census form (he made a similar one in 1871 by calling his son Frederick, Richard) or it was a transcription error by the Enumerator, we shall never know.

At the time of the 1871 Census, Tom was living at home but was farming somewhere locally. This occupation is a little difficult to square with reports that Thomas was the artistic "Bohemian" of the family but as Sunderland at the time Thomas was alive cannot have offered much opportunity for a bohemian way of life, perhaps farming was the next best thing!

No signed examples of Thomas's art have survived but it is thought that the portraits of his father and mother (see their pictures) were done by him. There is, also, a family story that one evening when everyone had gone to bed he skilfully painted the very realistic crack on a large gilt framed mirror that had been recently acquired by his father. This caused huge consternation in household when it was discovered there next morning and Thomas, rather impishly, allowed a gloomy breakfast to pass before eventually suggesting that a little turpentine might restore its former glory. It is said that the joke did not go down well; his father, in particular, being not atall amused. 179,180,181

+ 55 M    v. John Lockie Clark was born on 6 Jan 1852 in 14 North Bridge Street, Monkwearmouth, Co. Durham,182 was baptised on 29 Dec 1852 in St Peter's Church, Monkwearmouth, Co. Durham, died on 23 Oct 1935 in Homefields, Hunstanton, Norfolk 183 at age 83, and was buried on 26 Oct 1935 in St Mary the Virgin, Old Hunstanton, Norfolk.184,185

+ 56 F    vi. Catherine Jane Clark was born on 9 Nov 1853 in 14 North Bridge Street, Monkwearmouth, Co. Durham,190 was baptised on 3 Jan 1855 in St Peter's Church, Monkwearmouth, Co. Durham,191 and died on 15 Jun 1926 in Dulwich, Surrey at age 72.

   57 M    vii. Peter Lockie Clark was born on 24 Feb 1856 in 14 North Bridge Street, Monkwearmouth, Co. Durham,190 was baptised on 19 Mar 1860 in St Peter's Church, Monkwearmouth, Co. Durham,193 died on 25 Mar 1902 in 2 Roker Terrace, Sunderland, Co. Durham 194 at age 46, and was buried on 29 Mar 1902 in Bishopwearmouth Cemetery, Chester Road, Sunderland.

General Notes: Peter seems to have been the 'eccentric son' in his generation and a number of tales have been passed down about some of his more outrageous activities.

Leonard Clark, one of his nephews, used to recount stories about a trip that Peter made to Australia during which he apparently 'acquired' a snake from a snake charmer in India, won a major greyhound race in Sydney and bought all the barmaids in Sydney 'little black dresses' by way of celebration [Sydney was then a rather smaller city than it is now (2000)]. Whilst there, he had the idea that the family back home would enjoy having a kangaroo and duly dispatched one to Sunderland. Fortunately, his telegram regarding its arrival allowed it to be diverted to Whipsnade Zoo.

Richard Green claimed that Peter owned a camel and frequently rode it from his house in Roker to his Club in central Sunderland and also round by Whitburn. Also, he reputed to have regularly sparred with one of the Palmer family in whose business he worked at one time.

Peter was nearly 30 years of age when his father died and no information has survived regarding his activities up till that time, except perhaps that he might have worked at the Jarrow for the Palmer's Shipbuilding & Iron Co. Whatever they were, they had convinced his father that he was not going to contribute much to the family business or be very responsible with money — his father had already lent him £2500 by 1883. As a consequence, on his father's death, no role was suggested for him in the family business and his share of his father's estate was to be held in trust with him only being able to receive the income from it. However, the trustees (his elder brothers) were also empowered, if they saw fit, to let him have some or all of the capital; this they must have done, otherwise it seems unlikely that he would have been able to leave circa £64,000 on his death.

Peter's obituary says that he was a sleeping partner in the firm of Geo. Clark & Co and that statement & other evidence suggests that after his father's death, if not before, he led the life of a leisured gentlemen.

It is known that he was a keen fisherman and that he stayed from time to time at the Black Bull Inn at Etal, Northumberland, from where he used to fish the local streams. Otherwise, apart from the anecdotes above, little more is known about how he spent his days.
195,196

Some things about his life were:

• Report of death: 26 Mar 1902, Sunderland, Co. Durham. 197,198 The Sunderland Daily Echo gave this report of Peter's death:-

DEATH OF MR PETER CLARK

Last night, about eleven o'clock, Mr Peter Clark died at his residence, No 2 Roker Terrace. Mr Clark, who had been ailing for some time, was unmarried. He was the brother of the late Mr George Clark of the Southwick Engines Works, and was for some time engaged at Messrs Palmer's Works, Jarrow. Mr Clark was one of the governors of the Monkwearmouth Hospital but otherwise took no active part in public affairs.

While the Sunderland Herald & Daily Post said:-

The death is announced of Mr Peter Clarke, who has been ailing for sometime, which took place at his residence, 2 Roker-Terrace, last night, at 11 o'clock. Deceased was a brother of the late Mr George Clark, and was a sleeping partner in a firm of George Clark, Ltd. He was a bachelor, and, though he took no active interest in public life in Sunderland, he was interested in the work of the Monkwearmouth and Southwick Hospital.

• Probate Granted: 9 Jul 1902, Durham. 199 Left £63940 14s 7d.

+ 58 M    viii. James Henry Havelock Clark was born <1858> in Monkwearmouth, Co. Durham and died on 12 May 1953 in Sunningdale, Berkshire 200 at age 95.

+ 59 M    ix. Frederick Septimus Clark was born on 5 Jun 1861 in 8 Crescent Terrace, Sunderland, Co. Durham,203 was baptised on 26 Jun 1861 in St Michael's Church, Bishopwearmouth,204 and died on 17 Jul 1917 in Forest Row, Sussex 205 at age 56.

+ 60 F    x. Dorothy Clark was born on 8 Oct 1863 in 22 Park Place, Bishopwearmouth, Co. Durham,207 was baptised on 22 Feb 1865 in St Michael's Church, Bishopwearmouth,208 died on 4 Jan 1895 in Penshaw House, Penshaw, Co Durham 209,210 at age 31, and was buried in Bishopwearmouth Cemetery, Chester Road, Sunderland.211
 

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26. George Clark 75 was born <1837> in South Shields, Co. Durham.75

General Notes: George spent his working life as a carpenter or joiner.

George married Mary Harrison,215 daughter of Christopher Harrison and Susannah ———, in 1862 in South Shields, Co. Durham.76 Mary was born in 1838 in Houghton-le-Spring, Co. Durham 216 and was baptised on 7 Oct 1838 in Houghton-le-Spring, Co. Durham.217

The child from this marriage was:

   61 M    i. William Thomas Clark 215 was born <1863> in Houghton-le-Spring, Co. Durham.215

28. Thomas Clark 75 was born in 1848 in South Shields, Co. Durham.75,77

General Notes: Thomas's working life were spent as a joiner

Thomas married Annie Atkinson,218 daughter of Thomas Atkinson and Jane ———, in 1876 in South Shields, Co. Durham.78 Annie was born <1858> in Whickham, Co. Durham.218

Children from this marriage were:

   62 F    i. Annie Martha Clark 219 was born <1878> in South Shields, Co. Durham.219

Annie married in 1902 in South Shields, Co. Durham.

   63 M    ii. Thomas Herbert Clark 219 was born <1879> in Folkestone, Kent.218

   64 F    iii. Edith Clark 218 was born <1882> in South Shields, Co. Durham.218

   65 M    iv. Sydney Clark 218 was born <1884> in South Shields, Co. Durham.218

   66 F    v. Muriel Clark 218 was born <1886> in South Shields, Co. Durham.218

   67 F    vi. Florence Clark 218 was born <1890> in South Shields, Co. Durham.218

   68 M    vii. Gordon L Clark 220 was born <1894> in South Shields, Co. Durham.220

   69 F    viii. Helen M Clark 220 was born <1898> in South Shields, Co. Durham.220

30. Elias Clark was born <1844> in Framwellgate, Co. Durham and died in 1922 in Staffordshire at age 78.

General Notes: Elias spent the early part of his working life as a colliery engineer and later seems to have set up business in his own right as an engineer and smith.

Elias married Margaret Fawcett,221 daughter of Joseph Fawcett and Catherine Turnbull, in 1865 in Houghton-le-Spring, Co. Durham.80 Margaret was born in 1845 in Philadelphia, Co. Durham 221,222 and died in 1922 in Staffordshire at age 77.

Children from this marriage were:

   70 M    i. Joseph Clark was born in 1866 in Newcastle upon Tyne, Northumberland.

+ 71 M    ii. Robert Clark 221 was born in 1867 in Moorsley, Co. Durham.221,223

   72 F    iii. Mary Elizabeth Clark 221 was born in Dec 1870 in Moorsley, Co. Durham.221,224

   73 M    iv. Ernest Herbert Clark 225 was born in 1882 in Hednesford, Staffordshire.225,226

31. James Clark 79 was born <1846> in Framwellgate, Co. Durham.79

James married Elizabeth Brown, daughter of John Brown and Jane ———, <1869>. Elizabeth was born <1848> in Moorsley, Co. Durham.

Children from this marriage were:

+ 74 F    i. Mary Jane Clark was born <1870> in Belmont, Co. Durham.

+ 75 F    ii. Hannah Elizabeth Clark 228 was born in 1871 in Belmont, Co. Durham.228,229

+ 76 M    iii. John Robert Clark was born <1873> in Moorsley, Co. Durham.

   77 F    iv. Margaret A Clark was born <1875> in Holgath, Co. Durham.

   78 M    v. Walter Clark was born <1876> in Pittington, Durham.

General Notes: Walter was a Draper/Clothier in 1901.

Walter married Gertrude Hickman Howl, daughter of John Howl and Sarah ———, in 1900 in Dudley, Staffordshire.232 Gertrude was born <1877> in Great Bridge, Staffordshire.233

33. Margaret Jane Clark 79 was born in 1850 in Seaton Delaval, Northumberland.79,81

Margaret married William Henry Hunter in 1873 in Houghton-le-Spring, Co. Durham.82 William was born <1850> in South Shields, Co. Durham.

General Notes: William was a railway fireman who eventually worked his way up to become an engine driver.

Children from this marriage were:

   79 F    i. Alice Hunter 234 was born <1877> in Harton, Co. Durham.234

Alice married Peter Legg in 1900 in South Shields, Co. Durham.235 Peter was born <1875> in South Shields, Co. Durham.

   80 M    ii. Andrew Hunter 234 was born <1881> in Harton, Co. Durham.234

   81 M    iii. Matthew W Hunter 234 was born <1885> in Harton, Co. Durham.234

   82 M    iv. William Hunter 236 was born <1885> in Harton, Co. Durham.236

   83 M    v. Robert Hunter 234 was born <1888> in Harton, Co. Durham.234

   84 F    vi. Elizabeth Hunter 234 was born <1890> in Harton, Co. Durham.234

34. John Sheldon Wesley Clark 83 was born in 1853 in Castle Edon, Co. Durham.83

General Notes: John started off life as a joiner but later became a pattern maker for marine engines.

John married Margaret Ann Richardson,237 daughter of John Richardson and Susannah ———, in 1877 in Durham.84 Margaret was born in 1856 in Houghton-le-Spring, Co. Durham 237 and died in 1886 in Sunderland, Co. Durham at age 30.

Children from this marriage were:

   85 F    i. Cordelia Mary Clark 237 was born <1881> in Moorsley, Co. Durham.237

Cordelia married Sidney Dunsford Swann, son of John Duneford Swan and Isabella Cook, in 1900 in Houghton-le-Spring, Co. Durham.238 Sidney was born in 1876 in Easington Lane, Co. Durham.239

General Notes: Sidney was a steam engine fitter in 1901.

   86 M    ii. Frederick William Sheldon Clark 237 was born in 1879 in Moorsley, Co. Durham.240

   87 M    iii. Robert Edmund Clark 241 was born in 1884 in Moorsley, Co. Durham.241

Robert married in 1909 in Sunderland, Co. Durham.

John married Ann Bell,241 daughter of William Bell and Ann Young, in 1888 in Sunderland, Co. Durham.85 Ann was born <1867> in Berwick on Tweed, Northumberland.241

The child from this marriage was:

   88 M    i. Thomas William Clark 241 was born in 1890 in Sunderland, Co. Durham.241

44. Dorothy Clark was born in 1833 in Farrington Row, Bishopwearmouth, Co. Durham,103 was baptised on 9 Jul 1833 in St Michael's Church, Bishopwearmouth,106 and died in 1899 in Sunderland, Co. Durham at age 66.

Dorothy married Thomas Roach on 22 Nov 1856 in St James's, Westminster.107 Thomas was born <1834> in Monkwearmouth, Co. Durham and died in 1902 in Sunderland, Co. Durham at age 68.

Marriage Notes: Thomas & Dorothy might have known each other in their childhood as they grew up on the Wear, but they did not live near one another so it is more likely that they met when Dorothy's family was living in Stepney in the early 1850s. The Clark house was close to the London Docklands and Thomas could well have been on a ship that called at London; anyway, whatever the circumstances of their meeting, they were married in London shortly before the Clark family returned to Sunderland.

General Notes: Thomas and his brother John were probably orphaned quite early in their lives because they are to be found living with a Thomas & Elizabeth Brown at the time of the 1841 census. Thomas was aged 7 & John 5. Thomas Brown was a cordwainer and he and Elizabeth were probably relatives of the Roachs.

Thomas & Dorothy named their first daughter Lydia. The name Lydia does not appear in the Clark family before that time so quite possibly that it was the name of Thomas's mother. A Lydia Roach died in Sunderland in 1840 (the only Lydia Roach recorded in the General Register Index as having died at Sunderland prior to Thomas & Dorothy's daughter Lydia's death in 1864) so it is quite possible that she was Thomas & John's mother.

10 years later Thomas & John were living with Mary Brough and her family and were described in the census as being nephews (Mary's husband is not recorded and it is, therefore, not clear whether the Roachs were her relatives or her husband's). By then Thomas had become an apprentice blockmaker, perhaps taking a lead from Mary's son George who had a small blockmaking business. Mary's husband was a Master Mariner and later Thomas went to sea, possibly with Mary's husband, and went on to spend much of his adult life as a Mariner eventually becoming a Master Mariner himself. 242

Children from this marriage were:

   89 F    i. Lydia Roach 117 was baptised on 26 Dec 1858 in Bishopwearmouth, Co. Durham 117 and died in 1864 in Bishopwearmouth, Co. Durham at age 6.

   90 F    ii. Isabella Roach 117 was baptised on 1 Jun 1862 in Bishopwearmouth, Co. Durham 117 and died in 1895 in Sunderland, Co. Durham at age 33.

Isabella married Thomas Acres Wakefield, son of William Wakefield and Mary ———, on 6 Apr 1882 in Bishopswearmouth Church, Sunderland, Co. Durham 117.,243 Thomas was born <1855> in North Hylton, Co. Durham.

General Notes: Thomas was a blacksmith

   91 M    iii. Thomas Roach 117 was born on 26 Aug 1866 in Bishopwearmouth, Co. Durham 117 and was baptised on 9 Sep 1866 in Bishopwearmouth, Co. Durham.117

   92 M    iv. John Roach 117 was born on 8 Sep 1869 in Bishopwearmouth, Co. Durham 117 and was baptised on 3 Oct 1869 in Bishopwearmouth, Co. Durham.117

46. Isabella Clark was born in 1839 in Millfield, Bishopwearmouth, Co. Durham,103 was baptised on 3 Feb 1839 in St Michael's Church, Bishopwearmouth,110 and died in 1897 in Sunderland, Co. Durham 111 at age 58.

Isabella married Robert Kirton Letbe,244 son of James Letbe and Margaret Bedlington, in 1859 in Sunderland, Co. Durham.112 Robert was born <1827> in Robin Hoods Bay, Yorkshire 244 and died in 1898 in Newcastle upon Tyne, Northumberland 245 at age 71.

Children from this marriage were:

   93 M    i. John Clark Letbe 244 was born in 1860 in Sunderland, Co. Durham.244,246

John married Catherine Ellen Brown in 1887 in Sunderland, Co. Durham.247 Catherine was born <1859> in Manchester.

   94 M    ii. Robert Kirton Letbe 248 was born in Sunderland, Co. Durham 248 and died in 1864 in Sunderland, Co. Durham.248

   95 F    iii. Margaret Bedlington Letbe 244 was born in 1864 in Sunderland, Co. Durham.244,249

Margaret married James Alexander in 1885 in Sunderland, Co. Durham.250 James was born <1860>.

   96 M    iv. Robert Kirton Letbe 244 was born in 1866 in Sunderland, Co. Durham.244,251

Robert married Elizabeth Mary Lewis,253 daughter of James Lewis and Elizabeth Thomas, in 1896 in Sunderland, Co. Durham.252 Elizabeth was born <1869> in Sunderland, Co. Durham.253

   97 F    v. Ann Letbe 244 was born <1871> in Sunderland, Co. Durham.244,254

Ann married Alexander MacKay in 1891 in Sunderland, Co. Durham.255 Alexander was born <1865>.

   98 M    vi. Thomas Bedlington Letbe 256 was born in 1872 in Sunderland, Co. Durham 256 and died in 1874 in Sunderland, Co. Durham 257 at age 2.

   99 M    vii. Edward Ord Letbe 244,258 was born in 1875 in Sunderland, Co. Durham.244,258

Edward married Ada Rachel Smith, daughter of William Smith and Mary ———, in 1904 in Sunderland, Co. Durham.259 Ada was born in 1873 in Newcastle upon Tyne, Northumberland.

   100 M    viii. Thomas Letbe 244 was born in 1880 in Sunderland, Co. Durham.244,260

48. William Clark was born <1842> in Deptford Terrace, Bishopwearmouth, Co. Durham and was baptised on 8 Feb 1843 in St Michael's Church, Bishopwearmouth.115

General Notes: William was an engine fitter.

William married Mary Tait on 26 Jan 1862 in Bishopwearmouth, Co. Durham 116.,117 Mary was born <1843> and died in 1895 in Sunderland, Co. Durham 261 at age 52. Another name for Mary was Mary Tart.

Children from this marriage were:

   101 F    i. Isabella Clark was born in 1862 in Sunderland, Co. Durham 262,263 and was baptised on 14 Dec 1862 in St Michael's Church, Bishopwearmouth.264

   102 M    ii. George Clark 117 was born on 20 Nov 1866 in Bishopwearmouth, Co. Durham 117,262 and was baptised on 16 Dec 1866 in Bishopwearmouth, Co. Durham.117

   103 M    iii. John William Clark 265 was born on 18 Feb 1871 in Bishopwearmouth, Co. Durham 265 and died in 1901 in Sunderland, Co. Durham at age 30.

   104 M    iv. Adam Clark 265 was born on 9 Feb 1873 in Bishopwearmouth, Co. Durham 265 and died in 1880 in Bishopwearmouth, Co. Durham at age 7.

   105 F    v. Lydia Clark 117 was born on 10 Apr 1875 in Bishopwearmouth, Co. Durham,117 was baptised on 2 May 1875 in Bishopwearmouth, Co. Durham,117 and died in 1880 in Bishopwearmouth, Co. Durham at age 5.

   106 M    vi. Henry Blythe Clark 266 was born on 5 Apr 1878 in Bishopwearmouth, Co. Durham,117,266 was baptised on 12 May 1878 in Bishopwearmouth, Co. Durham,117 and died in 1914 in Sunderland, Co. Durham at age 36.

   107 F    vii. Ellen Clark 266 was born <1882> in Bishopwearmouth, Co. Durham.266

General Notes: Mentioned as a residual beneficiary in her grandfather Clark's Will.

Ellen married Peter Flanagan, son of Daniel Flanagan and Mary J E ———, in 1898 in Sunderland, Co. Durham.267 Peter was born <1880> in Sunderland, Co. Durham.

   108 F    viii. Mary Clark 266 was born <1884> in Bishopwearmouth, Co. Durham.266

General Notes: Mentioned as a residual beneficiary in her grandfather Clark's Will.

   109 M    ix. Thomas Clark 266 was born <1889> in Bishopwearmouth, Co. Durham.266

49. James Clark was born in Farrington Row, Bishopwearmouth, Co. Durham,130 was baptised on 26 Oct 1834 in St Michael's Church, Bishopwearmouth,131 died on 9 Aug 1909 in Newcastle upon Tyne, Northumberland 52,132 at age 74, and was buried in Elswick Cemetery, Newcastle upon Tyne.53

Some things about his life were:

• Probate Granted: 25 Sep 1909, Newcastle upon Tyne, Northumberland. 268 Effects: £6766 13s 10d

James married Mary Ann Turnbull, daughter of Thomas Turnbull and Jane Mason, in 1856 in Newcastle upon Tyne, Northumberland.133 Mary was born on 22 Oct 1833 in Bedlington, Northumberland,269 died on 27 Dec 1915 in Liverpool, Lancashire 52 at age 82, and was buried in Elswick Cemetery, Newcastle upon Tyne.53

Children from this marriage were:

+ 110 M    i. Thomas Turnbull Clark was born in 1857 in Newcastle upon Tyne, Northumberland 270 and died after 24 Jan 1899 in lost at sea aboard S. S. Laughton.52,271

+ 111 F    ii. Minnie Eugenie Clark was born on 26 Dec 1858 in Newcastle upon Tyne, Northumberland 273 and died on 6 Jan 1940 in Bromley, Kent 274 at age 81.

+ 112 F    iii. Lily Coral Clark was born on 8 Dec 1863 and died circa 1950 at age 87.

+ 113 F    iv. Theo Clark was born in 1865 in Newcastle upon Tyne, Northumberland.

   114 F    v. Ann Clyde Clark was born <1868> and died <1943> in Guernsey at age 75.

   115 F    vi. Margaret Jane Robson Clark was born in Jul 1870 in Newcastle upon Tyne, Northumberland.

General Notes: Peggy is reputed to have once been engaged but it came to nothing; she is said to have had a rather "anti-men" attitude and it must have prevailed.

She became a nurse and in the early 1930s was nursing at the Weymouth Street Nursing Home. She is reputed later to have become Matron of a hospital.

Lived for a while (during WWII) with her sister, Lily, in Guernsey.

   116 M    vii. James Clark was born <1871>.

+ 117 M    viii. Victor William Clark was born in 1874 in Newcastle upon Tyne, Northumberland.

50. Thomas Robson Clark was born in 1837 in Farrington Row, Bishopwearmouth, Co. Durham 130 and was baptised on 15 Jan 1837 in St Michael's Church, Bishopwearmouth.134

Thomas married Catherine Ann Blakey,279 daughter of Walter Blakey and Mary ———, in 1865 in Newcastle upon Tyne, Northumberland.135 Catherine was born on 14 Feb 1832 in Newcastle upon Tyne, Northumberland,53 was baptised on 29 Aug 1830 in All Saints Church, Newcastle-upon-Tyne,280 died on 29 Oct 1898 in Newcastle upon Tyne, Northumberland 281 at age 66, and was buried in Elswick Cemetery, Newcastle upon Tyne.53

Children from this marriage were:

   118 M    i. Thomas Clark was born <1866> in Newcastle upon Tyne, Northumberland.

   119 M    ii. Walter William Blakey Clark 279 was born <1867> in Newcastle upon Tyne, Northumberland.279

+ 120 F    iii. Kate Annabel Clark 279 was born in 1870 in Newcastle upon Tyne, Northumberland.282

   121 F    iv. Margaret Jane Marian Clark 279 was born in 1872 in Newcastle upon Tyne, Northumberland.284


51. Ann Lockie Clark was born on 30 May 1841 in Deptford, Bishopwearmouth, was baptised on 23 Jun 1841 in St Michael's Church, Bishopwearmouth, and died on 19 Nov 1926 in Dulwich, Surrey at age 85.

Some things about her life were:

• Probate Granted: 31 Jan 1927, London, England. 285 Effects: £8427 6s 7d. Resworn: £8405 11s 1d.

Annie married Cuthbert Vaux, son of Cuthbert Vaux and Sarah Ann Story, on 15 Nov 1859 in St Michael's Church, Bishopwearmouth 155.,156 The marriage ended in Separation. Cuthbert was born on 14 Jun 1838 in Lawrence Street, Bishopwearmouth, Co. Durham, was baptised on 11 Jul 1838 in St Michael's Church, Bishopwearmouth, died on 15 Jan 1893 in 25 Derby Street, Sunderland 286,287 at age 54, and was buried on 18 Jan 1893 in Bishopwearmouth Cemetery, Chester Road, Sunderland.288

Marriage Notes: Initially, the Clarks would have probably viewed Ann's marriage to Cuthbert Vaux favourably despite his having, what might seem to us to be an unpromising occupation. Cuthbert was then a butcher but his father was the founder of the famous Vaux brewery in Sunderland in whom, no doubt, Ann's father, George, recognised a fellow, up-and-coming entrepreneur.

Sadly, the marriage only survived about 15 years before Ann left Cuthbert; sometime between 1875 and 1881 they separated. Ann then sought a divorce on the grounds of Cuthbert's cruelty and adultery; charges which he denied when their case was heard in July 1881. However, Ann's evidence won the day and she was given a decree nisi with costs. Obtaining a divorce in such circumstances was rare in those days as women did not have the means to survive on their own, especially with a young family, unless there was a supportive man in the wings. Ann was, however, fortunate to have such a person in the form of her father.

Given the grounds of Ann's divorce from Cuthbert, it is surprising that Ann's father thought it necessary to stipulate in his Will, written two years after their divorce, that Ann must never "return to cohabitation " with Cuthbert if she wished to benefit from the trust fund that he had bequeathed to her and her sisters; perhaps, Ann's parents detected a lingering affection for Cuthbert which might have prompted her to take him back. As things turned out, Ann enjoyed the benefits of the trust fund until she died and she never married again. 289,290,291

General Notes: Sometime Butcher, Spirit Merchant and Farmer.


Children from this marriage were:

   122 F    i. Annie Lousia Clark Vaux was born on 12 Apr 1861 in Sunderland, Co. Durham,292,293 was baptised on 1 May 1861 in St Michael's Church, Bishopwearmouth,294 died on 7 Jun 1882 in The Terrace, East Boldon, Co. Durham 295 at age 21, and was buried in Bishopwearmouth Cemetery, Chester Road, Sunderland.296

Medical Notes: Annie died during or following the birth of her second child who was named after her. She was only 21 years old.

Annie married George Welch,298 son of Robert Welch and Mary Louisa Hubback, in 1878 in South Shields, Co. Durham.297 George was born in 1856 in Stockton on Tees, Co. Durham 298 and died in Jul 1931 in Newcastle upon Tyne, Northumberland 299,300 at age 75.

General Notes: Sometime timber merchant in Sunderland & Newcastle


Jane

   123 F    ii. Jane Clark Vaux was born on 21 Jan 1865 in 1 Waterloo Place, Sunderland.

Jennie married Daniel Gillies, son of John Gillies and Annie Castle, in 1882 in Newcastle upon Tyne, Northumberland.301 The marriage ended in Separation <1900>. Daniel was born in 1855 in Sunderland, Co. Durham.

Marriage Notes: Sometime around 1900 Daniel & Jennie separated. 289,290,291

General Notes: Sometime Secretary to a steelworks near Cleveland & later house agent in Sunderland. 302



   124 M    iii. George Clark Vaux 293 was born on 1 Apr 1868 in Sunderland, Co. Durham,293 was baptised on 10 Jun 1868 in St Michael's Church, Bishopwearmouth,303 and died on 6 Mar 1949 304 at age 80.

General Notes: George was a surveyor for the Lloyd's Shipping Register.



George married Mary Anne Davidson in 1892 in Sunderland, Co. Durham.305 Mary was born <1868> in Sunderland, Co. Durham.

   125 F    iv. Kate Vaux was born on 5 Jul 1870 in Sunderland, Co. Durham and died on 16 Aug 1942 in Gloucestershire 306 at age 72.

Some things about her life were:

• Probate Granted: 4 Dec 1942, Bristol. 307 Granted to Harry Sidney Cadle and Sybil Ann Cadle. Effects: £280 8s 4d

Katy married Henry Sidney Cadle, son of Miles Cadle and Emma Habgood, in 1893 in Wandsworth, Surrey.308 The marriage ended in Separation. Henry was born on 16 Aug 1863 in Stockton on Tees, Co. Durham,309 was baptised on 1 Sep 1863,310 and died on 2 Aug 1927 311 at age 63.

Marriage Notes: It is said that some time, possibly towards the end of WW I, Harry left Kate and the family home and took up with another woman. Certainly, his Will was proved by a Mrs Viber, a widow about whom nothing has been discovered, and he was not living at the family home at the time he died. Presumably, therefore, that he had left it to live with her.

Harry's estate only amounted to £165 which was very modest compared with his elder brother, Ernest, who left £29067. The latter may have inherited much of his father's estate, being the eldest son, but they were both solicitors and one might have expected Harry, who was practising in London, to have accumulated rather more assets than those proved by Mrs Viber. Perhaps, Harry left behind all his tangible assets when he walked out on the family. 289,290,291

General Notes: Being the youngest son, Harry probably benefited from his father's growing affluence because, at the age of 13, in 1876, he was sent to Rugby School. The fact that he obtained a scholarship to the school may also have influenced his father's decision to send him there.

He was, obviously, very able, academically, because during his time at Rugby he obtained two exhibitions, one minor and one major, which also, no doubt, helped with the school fees and he also went on to win a minor scholarship to St Johns, Cambridge. The School Register does not report any sporting achievements but he was appointed Head of School before he left at the end of the Lent term of 1882. He went straight up to Cambridge, starting in the summer term of the same year.

In 1885, he obtained a 2nd in the Classics tripos at Cambridge and then went on to train as a solicitor, being admitted one in 1889.

From the address given for him when the School Register was compiled in 1904, he was practising in Clifford's Inn, off Fleet Street.

Harry seems to have continued to practice as a solicitor for the next 20 years or so, possibly, to the end of his life. 312,313

Some things about his life were:

• Education: Bet 1876 and 1882, Rugby School, Rugby, Warwickshire. 312 Harry obtained a scholarship to Rugby, joining the School in 1876 in School House. He does not seem to have been a member of any of the School's teams but he was made Head of School before he left in the spring of 1882. He did, however, obtained two school exhibitions whilst at Rugby, so he was, without doubt, an able scholar.

• Education: Bet 1882 and 1885, St. John's College, Cambridge. 310,312 Harry was admitted on May 15, 1882 to St. John's where he had obtained a scholarship. He matriculated in the following Michaelmas term and read Classics. He was awarded his B.A. in 1885 having obtained a 2nd in the Classics Tripos.

• Probate Granted: 5 Nov 1927, London. 314 Effects: £165 10s

   126 M    v. Cuthbert Vaux 293 was born on 14 Apr 1875 in Sunderland, Co. Durham,293 was baptised on 9 Jun 1875 in St Michael's Church, Bishopwearmouth,315 and died before Jun 1926.

General Notes: At present (2009), information about Cuthbert and his family remains sparse. He is mentioned in his mother's Will as having died by the time she wrote it in 1926 when she also listed his surviving children. So far, apart from Oswin's, none of the children's date of birth or indeed marriages have been discovered and who Cuthbert married still remains a mystery.



52. George Clark was born on 14 Jun 1843 in Farrington Row, Bishopwearmouth, Co. Durham, was baptised on 7 Jul 1843 in St Michael's Church, Bishopwearmouth, died on 4 Mar 1901 in Mentone, France at age 57, and was buried in Bishopwearmouth Cemetery, Chester Road, Sunderland.

Some things about his life were:

• Report of death: 5 Mar 1901, Newcastle upon Tyne, Northumberland. 316 A north of England newspaper reported George's death as follows:-

DEATH OF MR GEORGE CLARK
OF SUNDERLAND.

We regret to announce the death of Mr George Clark, head of the well-known firm of Messrs Geo. Clark, Limited, marine engineers, Southwick, Sunderland. Mr Clark, with his wife and several members of the family, left home on the 22nd January for the south of France, and a telegram was received yesterday stating that he had died early in the morning at Mentone. The illness which terminated fatally developed very suddenly, for it appears that the first intimation that his eldest son, Mr George Clark, had that his father's condition was serious was received by him on Sunday. It is supposed that the deceased gentleman had contracted a chill some days ago.

Mr Clark was a born in the house in North Bridge Street, Sunderland, which is now known as the Manor Offices. At that time the works of his father (Mr George Clark, who was born at Fatfield, Durham, in 1815, and who was the founder of the firm) were in this locality, and he became manager of them at the age of 21. He had, in addition to his apprenticeship in Sunderland, gained a considerable experience in a large engineering establishment in London; and therefore he was eminently qualified to assume the practical management of the family concern. He soon earned for himself an enviable reputation as a marine engineer. He was a member of the Institute of Naval Architects, and of the Institute of Mechanical Engineers. He was a leading member of the Employers' Engineering Federation and of the Conciliation Board; and the esteem in which he was held by representatives of the men was shown by the confidence with which his judgment in trade disputes was received.

The deceased gentleman did not loom largely in public affairs, though he represented the Bridge Ward on the Sunderland Town Council thirty years ago, and he also sat for Southwick on the Durham County Council for six years. He retired only recently from the latter office. Deceased was a Justice of the Peace for the County of Durham. He was a director of the Sunderland and South Shields Water Company. As a Freemason he held an honoured place in the heart of his fellow-craftsmen. Politically, he was a Liberal, for, though he separated from Mr Gladstone on the Home Rule question, he retained his membership in the local Liberal Club.

Mr Clark was 58 years of age. In 1864 he married the daughter of Mr James Chalmers, schoolmaster. The family consists of five sons and three daughters. The eldest son, Mr George Clark, is closely connected with the firm, as is also his brother James. Mr W. Clark is with Messrs Holmes, electricians, of Newcastle. Mr Fred Clark is a solicitor. The present engineering works at Sunderland were built in 1872, the business having previously been carried on, as already intimated, in Monkwearmouth. The founder of the firm, the father of the gentleman whose death has now taken place, died in 1885 at the age of 68 years. It was he who built the first iron sailing vessel - the Loftus - ever turned out on the Wear, and to him belongs the same honour in regard to marine engines. It is understood that the body of the late head of the firm will be brought to Sunderland, where, at Ashbrooke

• Obituary: 4 Mar 1901, Sunderland, Co. Durham. 317 Sunderland Daily Echo, Monday, March 4th, 1901

DEATH OF MR GEORGE CLARK

It is with deep regret that we have to announce the death of Mr George Clark a highly regarded townsman and head of the firm of George Clark Limited, engineers, Southwick. The sad event occurred in Mentone, in the South of France. He and Mrs Clark and several members of the family had been wintering there since January 22nd and as far as was known in Sunderland Mr Clark was in his usual health. Nothing was known of his being indisposed until yesterday morning when a telegram was received by Mr George Clark, jun., stating that his father’s condition was hopeless, and this morning a further wire announced the sad news that he had passed away, apparently early this morning. No further details have yet been received, and it is supposed that the final illness must have been brief. About fifteen years ago Mr Clark underwent an operation for an internal complaint. Since then his health has been somewhat indifferent, and it is surmised that his death was not unconnected with this ailment and that it may have resulted from a chill. He was 58 years of age last June.

THE CLARK FAMILY have been associated with Sunderland for some generations, and the father of the Mr Clark who has just died was born at Fatfield in 1815. His father, however, had works at Sunderland, and he served his apprenticeship partly at them and partly at the Bishopwearmouth Ironworks. He gained experience in other parts of the country and in 1840 joined [his brothers] in the firm of Messrs John Clark and Co. Limited., and was principally employed in erecting engines for drainage in Cambridgeshire and pumping and winding engines for collieries and ironworks in Durham and other districts. After the dissolution of the partnership of the above firm he became manager of some small works in Sunderland, and was for seven or eight years engaged as engineer at the Consett Ironworks. He then returned to Sunderland and commenced on his account the business on the Wear which is at present associated with his name. At one time the business was carried on in North Bridge Street, where the Manor Offices now are, but it was twice removed, and in 1872 was transferred to the site at Southwick which it now occupies. This Mr Clark was the builder in 1851 of the first iron ship constructed on the Wear, the iron sailing ship, Loftus, and he also built the first marine engines made on the river. He died in 1885, aged 69, at Oak Lea. His son George, who has just died, was born in a house where the Manor Offices now stand, in North Bridge Street. He served his time with his father at the works there, and then spent a few years with Messrs Penn, engineers, London. His father had from an early age been afflicted with asthma, which rendered him almost invalid, so that his son had to undertake 

THE SOLE MANAGEMENT of the works when he was 21 years of age and under his direction they developed capacity. At the age of 21 he married Miss Chalmers, daughter of Mr James Chalmers, who was connected with a large school at the Grange and afterwards conducted an educational establishment in Murton Street. Mr Clark never figured very prominently as a public man. In the seventies he served for a time in the Town Council for Bridge Ward. On the election coming on an attempt was made by running Mr Robert Cameron with him to defeat Mr R Simey but it lost Mr Clark his seat. Mr Clark was not a great party man, preferring to judge questions more on their merits than from the strictly party standpoint. The only other occasion on which he became a public representative was in connection with the Durham County Council, on which he represented Southwick for six years, retiring on his term of office expiring just recently, as owing to business engagements, he was unable to give that attention to the duties of the position which he felt were necessary. While he served with the County Council he frequently attended meetings and took especial interest in the educational side of the work. In politics he was associated with the Liberals up to the Home Rule split, and he never, up to the time of his death, ceased his membership of the Liberal Club, although he was generally regarded as a Unionist. He held a very high position in connection with THE ENGINEERING INDUSTRY.

He was a member of the Institute of Naval Architects and of the Institution of Mechanical Engineers. He was also on one of the trade conciliation boards, and took an active part in all questions connected with the Engineering Federation of Employers. He was held in the greatest esteem by his fellow employers, and also by the working men and their leaders, and his judgement in all cases of dispute was accepted with confidence by both sides. Among other offices he held was the was that of director of the Sunderland and South Shields Water Company, and also had been a justice of the peace for the County [of Durham]. He was also a Freemason. Mr Clark leaves a widow and eight children, five sons and three daughters. His eldest son, Mr George Clark, is a member of the Southwick firm as is also Mr James Clark, Mr William Clark is with Messrs Holmes, electricians, Newcastle, Mr Fred Clark is a solicitor, and the other son is at school. Mr Clark was well known not only throughout the town but among a very wide circle beyond it especially in the engineering world. He was a kindly hearted man, without a trace of ostentation, and was held in the highest regard by all who knew him. His death will nowhere be more deeply deplored than amongst the residents of Southwick and amongst his employees who fully appreciated his many sterling qualities and characteristics. His residence in Sunderland was Ashbrooke Towers, and it is understood that the body will be brought home for internment.

• Funeral: 11 Mar 1901, Sunderland, Co. Durham. 318 A local newspaper reported George's funeral as follows:-

THE LATE MR GEO. CLARK

FUNERAL THIS AFTERNOON

The funeral of the late Mr George Clark, of Asbrooke Tower, Bishopwearmouth Cemetery this afternoon. The body, which had been brought in a polished oak coffin, with silver mountings, from Mentone, France arrived in Sunderland on Saturday and this morning was placed in the chancel of Christ Church where the first portion of the burial service was held. There was a very large attendance, both in the church and following the remains. Immediately after the private mourning coaches was a large number of workmen from the Southwick Engine Works. As the procession started from the chancel the organist, Mr Joblin, played the Dead March from “Saul”. The order of the funeral was as follows:—
Chaise: Dr Welford, Rev. C. G. Hopkinson (Christ Church), and the Rev. J. J. Brown (St Marks, South Shields).
The hearse with the coffin.
No. 1 carriage: Messrs Geo. Clark, Wm. Clark and Fred Clark, (sons of the deceased).
No. 2 carriage: Messrs John L. Clark and Henry Clark, (brothers).
No. 3 carriage:Capt. Chalmers, London (brother-in-law), Messrs A. A. Barker, (nephew), and Wm. Warren (manager of the Southwick Engine Works).
No. 4 carriage: Messrs. Joseph Snowball, (cashier), J. Billing, (chief draughtsman), Jas. Spiers,(foreman boilermaker), and A. Simpson, (assistant cashier).
No. 5 carriage:Messrs J. Kaye, J. G. Esdon, W. L. Sedgwick, John Robley, and Jas. Wilkie,(officials).
No. 6 carriage:Messrs Wm. Baston, C. McFarlane, J. Miller, R. Morgan, and W. Davison, (officials).

Then came the workmen and a large gathering of the friends of the deceased, as well as representatives of the different bodies with which he had been connected. The Engineering Employers' Federation were represented by Sir Benjamin C. Browne, Newcastle; Messrs R. S. Scott, of Greenock; A. P. Henderson, Glasgow; and A. Greenwood, Leeds; Messrs Thomas Biggart, Glasgow; and J. Robertson, Newcastle (secretary). There were also present Ald. Readhead, South Shields; Messrs H. H. Holmes, Newcastle; C. W. Taylor, South Shields;
R. P. Doxford, Silksworth Hall; John Dickinson; Robt. Thompson, Langham Towers; A. Dickinson, John Priestman, W. Pickersgill, T. G. Hutton, T. Pinkney, T. W. Pinkney, W. Pinkney, J. Short, T. S. Short, Fred Gordon, H. H. Wake, C. E. Thompson, R. M. Hudson, jun., R. H. Gayner, W. H. Dugdale (Messrs S. P. Austins and Sons Limited), R. T. Nicholson, J. Lloyd (Sir James Laing & Sons Limited), Alexander, Southwick; J. T. Thompson, Thornhill Park and Thomas Steel; Councillors Roche, Forster, and Harrison; Messrs James Stokoe, G. R. Booth, E.W. Gibson, and Maurice Moore; Messrs J. H. Cox, and Eggliston, representing the Sunderland and South Shields Water Co.; Mr James Mar (Messrs J. L. Thompson, Ltd.); Drs Murphy, Maling, Waterston, and Beattie, (the two latter representing the Provident Dispensary); Messrs J. T. Green and B. S. Branfoot (Sunderland Cricket and Football Club);
Messrs James Westoll, Jenneson Taylor, G. Child, and M. Wawn, Lieutenant Hines, Colonel Vaux, Lieutenant-Colonel Challoner, Major McKenzie, Messrs W. D. Mann, W. L. Byers, C. Ritson, Walter Beattie, A. O. Hedley, R. C. Nelson, —. Bartram, Tonkinson, J. Wallace, and John Rutherford; Messrs R. W. Walker, F. Pickersgill, J. Pratt, J. G. Hedley, R. B. Allison, W. Davison, J. J. Gilbertson, W. B. Thomas (surveyor), J. T. Todd (collector), J. C. Wilford (clerk), representing Southwick Urban District Council; Messrs J. Miller, G. Gardiner, P. Inglis, and H. Lovatt, Southwick School Board; Inspector Cowan, Messrs Jas. Armitage, R. Robertson, and H Brown.

Carriages were sent by Dr Welford, Mr J. T. Thompson, (Thornhill Park), Colonel Vaux, Mr Jas. Westoll, Mr Joseph Short, Mrs J. Y. Short, Capt. Pinkney, Mr D. H. Haggie, Mr John Priestman, Mr W. Pinkney (Whitburn), Coun. St. John, Mr Edwin Richardson, Mr R. M. Hudson, Colonel Mckenzie, Dr Morgan, and Mr H. Clark.

Expressions of regret at inability to attend the funeral were received from Mr R. S. Platt, of Oldham, Mr A. Siemens, of London, and Mr A. Coventry of Manchester (members of the Committee of the Engineering Employers' Federation); Mr J. P. Wilson, of Sir Chas. Mark Palmer's, Jarrow; Mr W. Boyd, Mr J. H. Irwin and several members of the North-East Coast Engineering Trades Employers' Association, and Dr J. Haswell, secretary of the association.

There was a large number of wreaths and crosses, which had been sent by the following:-
Mrs Clark, his sons and daughters, Mr and Mrs G. Clark, Master Geoffry Clark, Mr and Mrs W. Clark, Mr and Mrs J. Clark, Mr and Mrs H. Clark, the servants at Asbrooke Tower, Mr and Mrs Connaughton, F.S.C., Mr and Mrs James C. Dickinson, Miss Scurfield, Mrs, Miss, and Ed Wiener, Mr and Mrs Middlemost Wawn, Miss Pollie and Miss Ada Smith, London; Dr and Mrs R. Ayre Smith, Cotherstone; Mrs Joseph Thompson, Mr and Mrs F. Gordon, Mr and Mrs Thomas Cooper, Lancashire; Mr Wm. Black, Gateshead; Dr and Mrs Welford, Mr and Mrs Alfred Chalmers, London; Mr John Moore, Kent; Mrs J. Y. Short, Mr and Mrs Latta, London; Mr C. W. Taylor, Westoe; Mr and Mrs J. E. Thompson, the directors of S. P. Austin and Son, Limited; Mr and Mrs Robert Thompson, Langham Tower; Kensington Cycling Club, Mr and Mrs W. M. Roche, Mr and Mrs J. H. Hedley, Mr and Mrs Edwin Richardson, Mr and Mrs Wake, Mrs and the Misses Downies, Gosforth; officials at the Southwick Engineworks, workmen of Southwick Engineworks, Mr and Mrs F. T. Dickinson, Mr and Mrs G. R. Booth, Mr and Mrs V. T. Thompson, non com. officers of the Southwick Company of 1st D.V.A, committee of Sunderland Provident Dispensary, Mr Charles O. Nicholson, Mrs J. S. and Mr A. A. Barker, Mrs J. Vaux and family, Mrs F. W. Willcox and family, Mr and Mrs A. A. Rickaby, Mr and Mrs Harold Byers, Lady Duxford and Miss Duxford, Mr and Mrs W. Horn, Mr and Mrs Culliford, Mr and Mrs C. E. Thompson, Mrs Briggs and family, Moorlands; Mr R. M. Hudson, Mr and Mrs Alf. Dickinson, Mr and Mrs Joseph Thompson, Mr and Mrs Walford, Mr T. W. Pinkney, Mr Allan Thompson, Miss Dickinson, Mr and the Misses St. John.

The funeral arrangements were carried out by Mr Sinclair Todd, of Holmeside.

• Probate Granted: 18 May 1901, Durham. 319 Left £102613 16s 6d - Resworn November 1901 £100198 4s 9d and January 1902 £105948 4s 9d

George married Jessie Maude Chalmers, daughter of James McFarlane Chalmers and Jane Harrison, on 15 Nov 1864 in St Michael's Church, Bishopwearmouth. Jessie was born on 25 Dec 1843 in Vine Lodge, Bishopwearmouth, Co. Durham,320 was baptised on 31 Jan 1844 in St Michael's Church, Bishopwearmouth, died on 28 Dec 1935 in Queen's Hotel, Cheltenham at age 92, and was buried in Bishopwearmouth Cemetery, Chester Road, Sunderland.

Some things about her life were:

• Will signed: 30 Sep 1925, Woodall Spa, Lincolnshire. Her will provided for an annuity [free of all tax] of £58 10s 0d for her brother Tom. She left her personal effects to her daughters and any residue from her estate was to be divided equally between all her childern or, if they had not survived her, their childern.

• Probate Granted: 26 Jun 1936, Durham. 321 Left £5647 14s 4d. Her Executors were her sons, George Clark engine builder and Willam Clark brush manufacturer.

Children from this marriage were:

+ 127 M    i. George Clark was born on 25 Aug 1865 in 14 North Bridge Street, Monkwearmouth, Co. Durham,322 was baptised on 14 Sep 1865 in St Peter's Church, Monkwearmouth, Co. Durham,323 died on 21 Jan 1937 in The Green, Seaton Carew, West Hartlepool at age 71, and was buried on 23 Jan 1937 in Bishopwearmouth Cemetery, Chester Road, Sunderland.

+ 128 M    ii. James Chalmers Clark was born on 28 Mar 1868 in 14 North Bridge Street, Monkwearmouth, Co. Durham,322 was baptised on 5 Aug 1868 in St Peter's Church, Monkwearmouth, Co. Durham,325 died on 1 Dec 1931 in Wimbledon, Surrey 326 at age 63, and was buried on 4 Dec 1931 in Gap Road, Cemetery, Wimbledon.

+ 129 F    iii. Jessie Clark was born on 3 Mar 1869 in 14 North Bridge Street, Monkwearmouth, Co. Durham,322 was baptised on 14 Apr 1869 in St Peter's Church, Monkwearmouth, Co. Durham,328 and died on 27 Dec 1970 in Tirril Lodge, Tirril, Nr Penrith 329,330 at age 101.

+ 130 M    iv. William Clark was born on 17 Feb 1871 in 14 North Bridge Street, Monkwearmouth, Co. Durham,322 was baptised on 26 Apr 1871 in St Peter's Church, Monkwearmouth, Co. Durham,331 and died on 20 May 1956 in West Hertfordshire Hospital, Hemel Hempstead at age 85.

+ 131 M    v. Frederick Clark was born on 28 Oct 1874 in 1 Thornhill Terrace, Sunderland, Co. Durham,203 was baptised on 25 Nov 1874 in St Michael's Church, Bishopwearmouth,334 and died in Nov 1967 in California, USA 335 at age 93.

+ 132 F    vi. Mabel Clark was born on 17 Jun 1877 in 1 Thornhill Terrace, Sunderland, Co. Durham,203 was baptised on 30 Sep 1877 in St Michael's Church, Bishopwearmouth,337 and died on 10 Feb 1964 in Cambridge 338 at age 86.

+ 133 M    vii. Leonard Clark MC was born on 25 Apr 1883 in 1 Thornhill Terrace, Sunderland, Co. Durham,340 was baptised on 13 Jun 1883 in St Michael's Church, Bishopwearmouth,341 and died on 3 Jan 1974 in Victoria, British Columbia 342,343 at age 90.

+ 134 F    viii. Maude Clark was born on 26 Oct 1885 in 1 Thornhill Terrace, Sunderland, Co. Durham,346 was baptised on 21 Dec 1885 in Christ Church, Bishopwearmouth, Co. Durham,347 and died on 25 Aug 1966 in St John's Wood, London at age 80.


55. John Lockie Clark was born on 6 Jan 1852 in 14 North Bridge Street, Monkwearmouth, Co. Durham,182 was baptised on 29 Dec 1852 in St Peter's Church, Monkwearmouth, Co. Durham, died on 23 Oct 1935 in Homefields, Hunstanton, Norfolk 183 at age 83, and was buried on 26 Oct 1935 in St Mary the Virgin, Old Hunstanton, Norfolk.184,185

General Notes: Jack was a founder member of the Hunstanton Golf Club when it was formed in 1891 and was its Captain in 1897. He won the President's Prize in June 1908 aged 56 and the Captain's Prize in July 1921 when he was nearly 70. In 1922 the family present a perpetual annual challenge cup - The Clark Cup - which has been competed for ever since.

Regarded by his family as being rather tight with money.

Some things about his life were:

• Residence: 1918 to 1935, Homefields, Hunstanton, Norfolk. Though Jack had owned this property since atleast 1906 when it is mentioned in his son, Stanley's, wedding notice, he did not give up his Watford house until 1918 when he removed here. A publication of the Hunstanton Golf Club known as "SHAP SHOTS" records the following in its issue of 14th February, 1918:-

For J. L. Clarke we justly claim,
A front page on the Book of Fame,
His record of a man of parts
Is in the annals of West Herts,
that he and his with us abide
Is flattering to Hunston's pride.


West Herts was the Golf Club at Watford where Jack had been a member for many years.

• Will: 15 Mar 1928, Hunstanton, Norfolk.

• Obituary: 1 Nov 1935, King's Lynn, Norfolk. 351

HUNSTANTON

THE LATE MR. J. L. CLARK. — the death occurred at his residence, "Homefields" on the 23rd ult., of Mr. John Lockie Clark, aged 83 years. He was the son of Mr. George Clark, of Sunderland, founder of George Clark, Ltd., the Southwick engine-works firm. At the age of 20 he joined the shipping firm Culliford and Clark, a business founded over 100 years ago., and subsequently became a partner. He was well known in shipping circles, and was one of the pioneers of tramp steamer brokerage. He early saw the great possibilities of the pleasure cruise industry, and was responsible for the first venture in that direction. He purchased the s.s. Ceylon in 1881 which, after being specially fitted out, took 100 passengers for a cruise round the world. His firm owned the first ships that brought full cargoes of wheat from the Plate and cotton from the Gulf. He had offices in London, Sunderland, Newcastle, Glasgow and Liverpool, and in one season had 100 steamers engaged in the cotton-carrying trade. This was easily a "record" for this branch of business. These were but a few of his pioneering feats in the shipping world.

He at one time resided at Oakleigh Park, Friern Barnet, and later for 17 years at The Elms, Watford, before going to live permanently at Hunstanton. — Probably Mr. Clark will be best remembered for his activities in the world of sport, of which he was a veritable Admirable Crichton. He participated in and supported practically every form of outdoor entertainment. He was captain of his school cricket XI., and became a very keen and efficient boxer. He was a prominent member of the Belsize boxing club. Although he never rode regularly to hounds, he was a very fine rider and a splendid judge of horses, and always broke his own mounts in. As a golfer, when over the age of 60, he held the amateur records for two courses — Hunstanton and West Herts, Cassiobury Park. He was one of the founders of the former club, and was captain in 1897. He won the captain's prize when over 70, and played regularly until he was 82. In a recent article written by Bernard Darwin and published in "Golf Illustrated" he was referred to as the Grand Old Man of golf. An enthusiastic motorist since motoring’s earliest days, he owned a car in 1898 and was a contemporary member of the original Automobile Club with the Hon. C. S. Rolls., F. S. Edge and C. Jarrot. Shooting, swimming, diving and skating also found in him an active and skilful exponent. Greatly interested in photography from the time of the wet-plate, he later specialised in stereoscopic work, and had the first reflex camera constructed to his own design by Adams. He travelled extensively in his earlier days and visited most countries of the world. He became an excellent linguist and spoke French fluently. He was of an extremely kind and generous nature, and his courtesy and consideration to others endeared him to a wide circle of friends. A quiet benefactor to innumerable charities he was never known to refuse assistance to a deserving cause. During his residence in Hunstanton, football, tennis, cricket, the kennel society, music, and all social activities found in him a ready and liberal patron. Mr. Clark is survived by a widow (the daughter of the late Rev. A. E. Julius, a former rector of Southery), four sons and two daughters. His eldest son died in 1918.

The funeral of Mr. Clark took place at St. Mary's church, Old Hunstanton, on Saturday. The service was taken by the Rev. Douglas Smith, assisted by the Rev. H. F. Rushmer (vicar of Thornham). Mr. F. J. Bond was at the organ and a full choir was in attendance. As the mourners entered the church Chopin's Funeral March was played followed by "O for the wings of a dove." After a short service, Psalm xxiii. was chanted and "Abide with me" was sung. At the close the organist played the Nunc Dimittis. The immediate mourners were: the widow, sons and daughters, sons-in-law and daughters-in-law, other near relatives, members of the Homefield's staff, and some intimate personal friends. Others present included ....[then follows a long list of names]. The interment took place close to the south porch of the church, and the grave was lined with evergreens and dahlias. There were over fifty wreaths.

• Probate Granted: 20 Nov 1935, London, England. 352,353 Effects: £317,283 18s 5d.

Jack married Margaret Jane Thompson, daughter of Robert Thompson and Sarah Barbar, on 6 May 1874 in Holy Trinity, Southwick, Co. Durham 186.,187 The marriage ended in Divorce on 13 Jan 1885. Jane was born in 1853 in Sunderland, Co. Durham and died <1929> at age 76.

General Notes: A certain amount of mystery surrounds Jane's death. The George Clark & Co. share register suggests that she died sometime between 1929 & 1934 (only copies of every fifth year of George Clark & Co's share registers have been archived) but there is no record of her death to be found in the statutory records during those years so it may be that, like her son Richard, she died abroad possibly in France, a country of which she is said to have been particularly fond. Her youngest daughter, Dorothy, who had presumably been her companion during her later years, married in September 1930 which seems to suggest that Jane had died by that time, probably in 1929 or early 1930. (Dorothy was staying in an hotel in Gloucester Road at the time of her marriage).


Children from this marriage were:

+ 135 M    i. John Culliford Clark was born on 4 Mar 1876 in Hampstead, Middlesex,354 died on 26 Oct 1918 at age 42, and was buried on 30 Oct 1918 in Pinner, Middlesex.355

   136 F    ii. Helen Melita Clark was born on 9 Apr 1877 in Hampstead, Middlesex and died on 6 May 1970 in Surrey 357 at age 93.

Some things about her life were:

• Confirmation: 9 Mar 1894, All Saints Church, Friern Barnet, Middlesex. 358 Took her first communion on Easter Sunday, 1894

• Probate Granted: 10 Aug 1970, London, England. 359 Estate: £8912

+ 137 M    iii. Stanley Clark was born on 20 Nov 1878 in Hampstead, Middlesex 360 and died on 5 Jan 1954 in Hampshire 361 at age 75.

+ 138 F    iv. Jane Clark was born on 9 Apr 1882 in Hampstead, Middlesex and died on 30 Jul 1975 in Hampshire 364 at age 93.


Jack next married Lucy Adelaide Julius, daughter of Revd. Archibald Æneas Julius and Charlotte Mayor, on 9 Aug 1888 in Southery, Norfolk 188.,189 Lucy was born on 19 Feb 1864 in Southery, Norfolk, died on 30 Jan 1936 in Hazelmere, Royston Park Avenue, Hatch End, Middlesex 367 at age 71, and was buried in St Mary the Virgin, Old Hunstanton, Norfolk.185

Marriage Notes: Lucy lived about three months after Jack died and they are both buried beside the south porch of St Mary the Virgin Church in Old Hunstanton; the inscription on their gravestone reads:-

In Memory of
John Lockie Clark
died 23rd October 1935
Also of
Lucy Adelaide Clark
died 30th January 1936
"till the dawn break" 368

Some things about their marriage were:

• Wedding: 9 Aug 1888, Southery, Norfolk. 369 

SOUTHERY

WEDDING FESTIVITIES

The parish of Southery was en fete on Thursday, August 9th on account of the marriage that took place that day between John Lockie Clark, Esq., of Oakley Park, Hertfordshire and Miss Lucy Adelaide Julius, youngest daughter of the Rev. A. E. Julius Rector of Southery. As the bride and her family are widely known and highly esteemed throughout the district the event assumed quite a public character. The village was freely decorated with mottoes and flags, of which there were many festoons stretching at intervals across the roadways. The principal features of ornamentation were exhibited in the neighbourhood of the Rectory and the Church, which are not far distant from each other. Upon the lawn in front of the Rectory were two marquees, in one of which were displayed the handsome presents received by the bride and bridegroom, whilst in the other the guests were entertained. The floor was boarded and carpeted, and the tables were decorated with plant and flowers. On either side of the pathways leading to the tent where some fine shrubs in pots, supplied by Mr. James Bird, of Downham. Near the entrance to the Rectory was a triumphal arch of evergreens, bearing the inscription on one side, "Long life and prosperity," and on the other side, "Health and happiness," severally worked in ornamental straw letters upon chocolate cloth. Surrounding the structure were festoons of red, white and blue coloured glass bucket-lamps, which when lighted at night, presented an exceedingly pretty appearance. Over the churchyard gate was another triumphal arch, bearing "God bless the happy pair" and "This day I will bless you." The pathway from the Vicarage across the public highway to the north entrance to the church was covered with matting, and the aisle of the newly renovated church to the communion rail was laid with carpeting. Upon the holy table was a cross of white lilies, marguerites, daises, and jasmine; and upon the retable two vases of marguerites, white foxgloves and ferns. Shortly after 11 o' clock the band of the Ely Volunteers (H Company), under the leadership of a Bandmaster J. Joselyn, met upon the Rectory lawn, where they played for about half an hour. The bridegroom, attended by his bestman (Mr. H. Clark, of Thornhill Park, Sunderland), arrived at the church at 11.30, and soon after the bridal procession left the Rectory. The bride who was accompanied by her father, wore a dress of rich white corded silk, trimmed with a handsome old point lace scarf, with bouquets of orange blossom and fruit. In her hair were entwined orange blossoms, a wreath of which caught up her tulle veil. She carried a handsome bouquet composed of white flowers - stephanotis, tuberoses, eucharis, gardenias, bouvardias, and roses - bordered with maidenhair fern. The bridesmaids were Miss Blanche Julius, sister of the bride, who wore a cream-coloured Indian muslin dress, and with coffee - - - and apple green ribbon, with stringless fancy white bonnet trimmed with Marochal Niel roses, Miss Jessie Virtue, Miss Ethel Virtue, Miss Ethel Julius and Miss Ella Brewin, cousins of the bride (who were attired similarly to the chief bridesmaid, but wore large Leghorn hats trimmed with white tulle, apple green ribbon and Marochal Niel roses). Each bridesmaid carried a posy of choice mixed flowers (carnations, mignonette, roses and lilies) and solid silver scent bottles, elegantly hand-painted, with forget-me-nots, these being presents from the bridegroom.

The groomsmen were Messrs. H. Clark, A. H. Leigh, W. M. Blyth, G. Clark, and R. Culliford. As the procession entered the church, the choir sang "The voice that breathed o'er Eden." The Rev. H. S. Miles, Vicar of All Saints, Oakley Park, Hertfordshire, and the Rev. Canon Beechy, Rector of Hilgay, officiated, and the bride was given away by her father. The psalm "God be merciful unto us" was chanted by the choir and the large congregation. At the conclusion of the ceremony Miss Tearle played a lively march upon the organ, and the band performed the Royal Wedding March, whilst Mr. and Mrs. Clark left the Church amidst tangible proofs of goodwill from hundreds of spectators who lined the pathway to the Rectory. Breakfast was served in the marquee. The wedding cake was supplied by Mr. W C Smith, of High Street, Lynn.

The company included the bride and bridegroom, the Rev A E Julius, and Miss Blanche Julius, Misses Jesse and Ethel Virtue, Miss Ethel Julius, Miss Ella Brewin, Messrs H Clark, A H Leigh, W M Blyth, G Clark, R Culliford, Ven. Archdeacon and Mrs Nevill, Mr and Mrs E C P Hull, Rev H S Miles, Rev Canon and Miss Beechey, Rev A S, Mrs and Miss Latter, Rev S and Mrs Churchill, Rev J and Mrs Crosse, Rev H Smith, Rev J McGill, Rev and Mrs Rogers, Mr R W E Gibbon, Miss Kate Julius and Mr Leslie, Dr. Mackintosh, the Misses Tearle, Mr and Mrs Peacock, Miss Steele, Rev E R, Mrs and Miss Willford, Mr E H Willford, Rev A W Hertzberg, Rev H C Price, &c. The band played upon the lawn during the repast. At its close Mr E C P Hull of Southery House, Earlswood Common, son-in-law of the Rev A E Julius, proposed "The Bride and Bridegroom", and Mr J L Clark returned thanks, and proposed "The Bridesmaids," for whom Mr H Clark replied, and then gave "Our host, the Rev. A E Julius." Other toasts were given. At 3 o'clock the happy pair departed for Scotland to spend the honeymoon. During the afternoon a garden party was held at the Rectory. In the evening the grounds were illuminated by hundreds of coloured glass lamps, and the proceedings of a happy day, during which the Rev. A. E. Julius and his family did their utmost to please everyone, concluded with a dance.


Some things about her life were:

• Grant of Administration: 17 Mar 1936, London, England. 370 Effects: £11080 11s 0d. Resworn: £10795 14s 4d.

Children from this marriage were:

+ 139 M    i. Ivan Julius Clark was born on 28 Jun 1889 in Southampton Lodge, Oakleigh Park, Middlesex,60,371 was baptised on 6 Jun 1891 in All Saints Church, Friern Barnet, Middlesex,60 died on 13 Jun 1931 in 26 Capel Road, Colchester 372,373 at age 41, and was buried on 16 Jun 1931.

+ 140 M    ii. Archibald Cowper Clark was born on 9 May 1891 in Southampton Lodge, Oakleigh Park, Middlesex,60,375 was baptised on 6 Jun 1891 in All Saints Church, Friern Barnet, Middlesex,60 and died on 28 Jul 1966 in St George's Nursing Home of Ferndown, Ringwood Road, Ferndown, Wimbourne, Dorset at age 75.

+ 141 M    iii. Malcolm Clark was born on 17 Dec 1892 in Southampton Lodge, Oakleigh Park, Middlesex,378,379 was baptised on 23 Jan 1893 in All Saints Church, Friern Barnet, Middlesex,379 died on 1 Nov 1952 in The Norfolk and Norwich Hospital, Norwich 200,380 at age 59, and was buried on 6 Nov 1952 in Cawston Cemetery, Norfolk.381

   142 M    iv. Major Percival George Clark was born on 11 Apr 1896 in Southampton Lodge, Oakleigh Park, Middlesex,379 was baptised on 18 May 1896 in All Saints Church, Friern Barnet, Middlesex,379 died on 17 Oct 1964 in Surbiton Hospital, Surrey 383 at age 68, and was buried on 21 Oct 1964 in Surbiton Cemetery, Surrey.384

General Notes: George came to be regarded as the black sheep of the family. He left Malvern College at the end of the summer term in 1914 and eventually found his way into the Norfolk Regiment into which he was eventually commissioned. He survived WWI and after it went out to California to farm peaches presumably with money lent him by his father; at that time one of his cousins, Fred Clark, was already well established in Lincoln, Placer County, growing fruit and it is, also, probable that his brother Ivan was still in America.

George gave up the farm after a year or two and went to Hollywood where he worked as an "extra" or in some minor part in a number of films. The story has it that he had been giving his father glowing reports on how things were going with the fruit farm and it was not until his father and mother were at the cinema one night and recognised him in the film they were watching that the truth came out.

We know that George was back in England by 1926 because a poem that he wrote about golf was published in The Tatler in the May of that year. He seems to have remained in England for the next 20 years or so playing lots of golf (he won the Captain's Prize at the Hunstanton Golf Club in May 1929 and again in May 1932), getting married in 1935 and later serving in WWII as a Major with the School of Military Administration. How he supported himself (and later his wife) during those years is unclear but from 1936 he would have had the benefit of his father's Will.

After WWII George & Lilian went out to Kenya to grow coffee but this was not much more successful than the peach farming venture. George took to the bottle in early middle age and used to disappear for weeks at a time on a 'binge'. He was a brilliant golfer when sober with a handicap of +2. He was eventually completely cured of his drink problem and spent much time in his later years organising charity golf tournaments.

He & Lilian had no children and the trust set up for him by his father's Will was distributed on his wife's death to his nephew Michael and others. 374

Some things about his life were:

• Education: May 1910-Jul 1914, Malvern College, Malvern, Worcs. 385 George joined the School in the Middle Shell form, in the middle school, at the age of 14, which indicates that he probably did a good entrance exam, but only achieved the Upper 5th by the time he left. This was fairly modest progress for someone who had started so well and it may be that the School did not engage George's interest on the academic side.
Surprisingly, however, this was not because he was distracted by sporting activities as was so often the case in those days. Indeed, he does not seem to have excelled in any team games as he is not recorded as having represented either his House or School in any events. He did, however, win the Andersen Medal for the best gymnast in the School; a medal which carried much more prestige then than it does today (2000).

George was, of course, mad about golf even during his teenage years and his success as an individual on the greens must have amply compensated for his lack of success in school games and may even have been the cause of it.

• Military Service: Various Places. 385 In WWI George served with the Norfolk Regiment as a lieutenant. In WWII, he served as a Major in the School of Military Administration.

• Publications: 3 Mar 1926, London, England. 386 George wrote an amusing golf poem called "The Ghost of the 18th Green" which was published with illustrations in The Tatler.

• Will: 21 Apr 1964, Surbiton. 387 Sole Executor: Douglas Selbourne Whitehouse of 3 King's Bench Walk, Temple, London, solicitor. (This address is that of Merriman White, the firm of solicitors of which his brother Malcolm was a partner for many years so it is very likely that this is the Will of Malcolm's brother).

Left every thing to his wife Lilian bar some field glasses which he left to Douglas Whitehouse.

• Probate Granted: 18 Nov 1964, London, England. 388 Effects: £1784

George married Lilian Gertrude Hazledine, daughter of William Hazledine and Gertrude Griffiths, in 1935 in Marylebone, London.389 Hazel was born on 16 Jul 1905 in Pembroke 390 and died on 28 Jun 1983 391,392 at age 77.

Marriage Notes: Joyce Buckland thought that Lilian was a nurse who George met when in hospital after a near fatal accident during WW1 when, as a Dispatch Rider, he crashed his motorcycle into the back of an army truck in a convoy one night but this is improbable as Hazel would have been only 10 years of age in 1915 would not have been old enough to be nursing then.

However, according to George's nephew Michael Clark, Lilian had been his secretary or housekeeper and when he married her in 1935 and it had been with some trepidation that he broke the news to his parents. 368

Some things about her life were:

• Probate Granted: 21 Nov 1983, London, England. 393 Effects: £5079 which she left to her brother, who was her executor, her sister and another relative.

56. Catherine Jane Clark was born on 9 Nov 1853 in 14 North Bridge Street, Monkwearmouth, Co. Durham,190 was baptised on 3 Jan 1855 in St Peter's Church, Monkwearmouth, Co. Durham,394 and died on 15 Jun 1926 in Dulwich, Surrey at age 72.

Some things about her life were:

• Probate Granted: 27 Aug 1926, London, England. 395 Effects: £9998 8s 0d.

Kate married Dr Robert Ayre Smith M.D., son of Dr James Smith M.R.C.S. Edin, L.R.C.P. Edin. and Jane Ayre, on 12 Jun 1873 in St Michael's Church, Bishopwearmouth.192 Robert was born <1844> in Monkwearmouth, Co. Durham and died on 20 Feb 1902 in Cotherstone, North Yorkshire 396 at age 58.

Some things about his life were:

• Education: c.1861-1866, Various Places. 397,398 Though he obtained a L.R.C.P. and a L.R.C.S from Edinburgh University in 1866, Robert did not actually study at the University but took the exams as a medical student at one of Edinburgh's teaching hospitals. Later he went on to obtain his MB
(1870) and MD (1872) from Glasgow University in the same manner except that he was working at Sunderland Infirmary during that time.

• Occupation: Bet 1866 and 1902, Various Places. 399,400 There is no record of what Robert did immediately after he obtained his Licentiates in Edinburgh, perhaps he remained in some capacity at the hospital where he had trained. However, from 1868-1869 he was a House Surgeon at the Sunderland Infirmary and when he had obtained his MB he went into general practice, possibly with his father. During the next 16 years, he was sometime, Hon. Surgeon at the Infirmary and the Sick Children's Hospital and Medical Officer for Health in Southwick and at the Monkwearmouth & Southwick Dispensary.

In 1886, because of poor health, he moved down to Norwood, South London to escape the rigours of Sunderland's northeastern weather. Here he seems to have practiced until 1901 when ill health forced him to retire to "Kinfauns", Cotherstone, North Yorkshire where he died in February 1902.

Note: The choice of South London may have been connected with the fact that his wife's sister, Ann, had settled there about that time and the return to Cotherstone may have been to a house which he already owned because in 1884 his youngest son, George, was born in the village.

• Will: 5 Nov 1884, Sunderland, Co. Durham. 401 Left everything to his wife Kate.

• Report of death: 21 Feb 1902, Sunderland, Co. Durham. 402 A local newspaper carried this report of Robert's death:-

DEATH OF DR R. AYRE-SMITH

The death took place at Cotherstone yesterday of Dr Robert Ayre-Smith, M.D., formerly of London and of this town. The doctor was 57 years of age, and had been invalid for a considerable time. He was well-known in Sunderland, and some 15 or 16 years ago he was surgeon at the Infirmary. Subsequently, he moved to West Norwood, London, and thence to Cotherstone. He leaves a widow, three sons and four daughters. The elder son is now a physician at the Sunderland Infirmary.

• Obituary: 21 Feb 1902, Sunderland, Co. Durham. 403 Another Sunderland newspaper carried this obituary for Robert:-

DEATH OF DR R. AYRE-SMITH

The many friends of Dr Robert Ayre-Smith will be sorry to learn of Dr Robert [sic] which occurred at his residence, West Norwood, London, yesterday. A quarter of a century ago he was a well-known figure in the public life of the town, and practised his profession with much success. He first lived on the North side, and later moved to Frederick-street, Bishopwearmouth, where he resided until his departure from Sunderland about 20 years ago. He left the neighbourhood because of the climate did not agree with his constitution. When resident here he took an active interest in local affairs, especially sanitary matters, and on the 16th June 1881 was returned to the Town Council for the Monkwearmouth ward at a bye-election, and without opposition. In 1883 he was again elected for the same ward along with Colonel W. H. Allison, but did not seek re-election at the expiration of his second term of office. During his residence on Wearside he was one of the honorary physicians of the Sunderland Infirmary, where his son, Mr A. Aye-Smith is at present resident-physician, and where one of his daughters is engaged as a nurse. The deceased gentleman who was much respected in Sunderland and in West Norwood, was 57 years of age.

Note:
This article is wrong about where Robert died which was in the Yorkshire village of Cotherstone.

• Probate Granted: 26 Jun 1902, London, England. 404 Effects: £2016

Children from this marriage were:

   143 F    i. Ethel May Smith was born in 1874 in Sunderland, Co. Durham.

   144 M    ii. Alan Ayre Smith was born in 1876 in Sunderland, Co. Durham.

Alan married Meta Turnbull in 1908 in Sunderland, Co. Durham.405 Meta was born in 1881 in Sunderland, Co. Durham.

   145 F    iii. Hilda Smith was born in 1878 in Sunderland, Co. Durham and died before 1925. (Twin)

   146 M    iv. Oswyn Smith was born in 1878 in Sunderland, Co. Durham. (Twin)

Oswyn married Dorothy V Fairbairns in 1919 in Lambeth, London.406

   147 F    v. Dora Smith was born in 1879 in Sunderland, Co. Durham.

   148 F    vi. Jane Clark Smith was born <1882> in Sunderland, Co. Durham.

Jane married Hartog before 1925.

   149 M    vii. George Clark Smith was born <1884> in Cotherstone, North Yorkshire.

George married Jane Eleanor Moffet in 1908 in Tynemouth.407 Jane was born <1875>.

58. James Henry Havelock Clark was born <1858> in Monkwearmouth, Co. Durham and died on 12 May 1953 in Sunningdale, Berkshire 200 at age 95.

General Notes: Henry was, in all likelihood, named in a moment of patriotic fervour after Sir Henry Havelock who relieved Lucknow in 1857 and who was an eminent "son" of Sunderland.

Alan Wancke, his grand-nephew, remembers him as a rather formal man in business. 408

Some things about his life were:

• Education: Sep 1872-Jul 1874, Sherborne School, Dorset. 409,410,411 According to his obituary in The Times, Harry was at school in Durham before going to Sherborne when he was about 14. He left Sherborne aged about 16 and, again according to the same obituary, went to study at Heidelberg University before starting a law career as an articled clerk in a firm of solicitors in London. No mention of his time at Heidelberg University has been found in the University's records and it would have been quite difficult for him to have been qualified by the time of the 1881 Census if he had studied for a degree there; perhaps his visit to Heidelberg was a brief one.

• Occupation: Bet 1883 and 1936, Sunderland, Co. Durham. Harry had intended to pursue a legal career. However, it is said, that in 1883 his father persuaded him to return to Sunderland and the family business because by then his father's health was failing and he was concerned that Harry's brother, George, who had been managing the Southwick Engine Works on his own, needed help.

Harry dutifully gave up being a solicitor in London and took over the role of under-manager at the Works. He remained under-manager until the family firm turned itself into a limited liability company in 1889 when he became joint managing director with his brother, George. When George died in 1901 Harry became sole MD and Chairman which he remained until the Company reconstructed its finances in 1936 and became George Clark (1936) Limited at which point his nephew, George, jun., took over as MD and Chairman.

Harry presided over Geo. Clark Limited during a turbulent 35 years which took in the Great War, the long boilermakers lockout in 1923, the fire at the Engine Works in July 1924 and the severe economic downturn in the 1930s which led to a considerable contraction in shipbuilding on the River Wear and the eventual amalgamation of Geo. Clark Limited with Richardsons and Westgarth Limited and North-Eastern Marine Engineering Co. Limited in 1938.

In 1938 Harry retired from the Company and leaving Whitburn, where he had lived for many years, he went to live in Sunningdale, Berkshire, not far from where his son lived in Sunninghill.

• Obituary: 15 May 1953, Sunderland, Co. Durham. 412 

DEATH OF MR J. H. H. CLARK

Mr James Henry Havelock Clark, sixth a son of Mr George Clark, the founder of the Southwick engineworks of George Clark Limited has died after a long illness at his home in Sunningdale, Berkshire. He was 95.

Mr Clark was connected with the engineworks for most of his life. Originally intended for a law career, he took control of the family business in 1901 on the death of his elder brother, Mr George Clark, and was actively connected with it until 1938 when arrangements were completed for an amalgamation with Richardsons and Westgarth Limited and the North-Eastern Marine Engineering Co. Limited. Mr Clark then retired at the age of 81 and moved to Sunningdale.

His departure broke a 28-year link with the River Wear Commission, on which he sat as the representative of the engine builders. He was warmly praised by the late Sir Frank Nicholson, the then Chairman, for his outstanding services to the port of Sunderland.

For more than 20 years Mr Clark lived in Whitburn and was a member of the Whitburn Parish Church. He was a member of the Wearside Golf Club and he maintained his interest of golf after he left Sunderland.

He leaves a daughter, Mrs Kinsman, and a son, Mr John Clark.

• Obituary: 20 May 1953, London. 413 MR. J. H. H. CLARK

A correspondent writes:-

The recent death of Mr. James Henry Havelock Clark at Sunningdale, Berkshire, at the age of 95 breaks a chain of succession stretching from the early days of shipbuilding and engineering when iron ore was replacing wood and steam replacing sails. He was the sixth son of George Clark (who was born in 1815), the founder of the Southwick Engine Works in 1851 and " father " of marine engineering on the River Wear, who had also initiated iron shipbuilding on the same river, building the Loftus in 1851, the first iron vessel built on that river. Educated at Durham, Sherborne School, and at the University of Heidelberg, he later obtained his certificate as a solicitor but abandoned his intended legal career on the request of his father, whose health was failing, and joined his eldest brother, George, in 1883 as under-rnanager of the Southwick Engine Works.

In 1901, on the death of his brother George, he assumed the general management of the works, which position he held for the next 36 years until his retirement in 1937. He was keenly interested in the Hudson Charity and many other charities in his native town of Sunderland and he was for many years a River Wear Commissioner and a Justice of the Peace for the County of Durham. He was also at one time chairman of the North-East Coast Institution of Engineers and Shipbuilders and during the critical war years of 1914-18 vice-chairman of the North East Coast Defence under the chairmanship of Sir Percy Girouard. In 1890 he married Evelyn Isabel Marsh, who died in 1930. They had one daughter and one son who survive him.

• Probate Granted: 12 Aug 1953, London. 414 Effects £191781 2s 4d.Henry & Evelyn Clark 1890

Harry married Evelyn Isabel Marsh, daughter of John William Marsh and Clementine Isabel Hogath, on 13 Nov 1890 in St Margaret's, Lowestoft 201.,202 Evelyn was born in 1868 in Poplar, London 415 and died on 21 Jun 1930 in Whitburn, Co. Durham 416 at age 62.

Marriage Notes: Evelyn's father was a solicitor in London for whom Henry may have worked during his articles or in the brief period during which he practiced in London.  Alternatively, he may have been known to the Clark family as a result of his firm acting for Henry's older brother, John, in the latter's shipping interests.

It is interesting to speculate whether Evelyn and Henry met when Henry was working in London or later; she would have been only 16 when Henry left London in 1883 to join the family firm. The photograph of Evelyn and Henry on the right was taken in Nice when they were there on their honeymoon; it is said that they had to cut short their stay there because Henry lost all his money gambling in the casino at Monte Carlo.

Some things about her life were:

• Grant of Administration: 22 Nov 1930, London, England. 417 Effects: £22209 16s 7d. Resworn: £11852 15s 0d

Children from this marriage were:

+ 150 F    i. Evelyn Mary Clark was born on 3 Sep 1891 in Claremont Terrace, Sunderland, Co. Durham, was baptised on 31 May 1892 in Christ Church, Bishopwearmouth, Co. Durham, and died on 19 Jan 1981 in Blackdown Nursing Home, Mary Tavy, Tavistock, Devon at age 89.

+ 151 M    ii. Henry John Clark was born on 4 Aug 1892, was baptised on 1 Nov 1892 in Christ Church, Bishopwearmouth, Co. Durham, and died on 22 Dec 1964 in London, England at age 72.


59. Frederick Septimus Clark was born on 5 Jun 1861 in 8 Crescent Terrace, Sunderland, Co. Durham,203 was baptised on 26 Jun 1861 in St Michael's Church, Bishopwearmouth,421 and died on 17 Jul 1917 in Forest Row, Sussex 205 at age 56.

General Notes: His father originally intended that Fred should become involved in the Clark's shipping interests and sent him to London to learn the business, presumably in the firm of Culliford & Clark under his elder brother, John. It was while he was living at John's house that he began an affair with John's wife, Jane, which led to her leaving John (and he seeking a divorce from her in 1884) and to her marrying Fred.

When Jane and he married in 1885 he described himself as a "ship-broker" but he does not seem to have continued as one, indeed, as he was persona non grata with the rest of the family and his brother, in particular, it seems very unlikely that he continued to work for Culliford & Clark. Also, his father having died in that year, he inherited what in those days was a respectable fortune and no longer needed to work to support his family. By 1889 he was describing himself as a "gentlemen" which, in the fashion of those times, meant that he had no occupation or profession.

NB. The photograph shown for Fred may not be of him; it is taken from a family group in which his wife and daughter, Peggy, can be identified from other photographs and the assumption has been made that middle-aged man in the group is him. There is also another photograph of the same person outside a conservatory at what is believed to be The Haven, Crawley Down. 422

Some things about his life were:

• Report of death: 21 Jul 1917, East Grinstead. 423 

FOREST ROW

THE DEATH occurred, somewhat suddenly on Tuesday afternoon, of Mr F. S. Clark a well known resident of this district. He resided at WHITECROFT and had been in a weak state of health for some time, so his end was not altogether unexpected. Before coming to Forest Row Mr Clark resided at Haven, Crawley Down. He was a genial, good natured gentlemen and had many friends in the district.

• Probate Granted: 11 Oct 1917, London, England. 424 Effects: £42826 8s 4d.
Jane 

Frederick married Margaret Jane Thompson, daughter of Robert Thompson and Sarah Barbar, on 23 Feb 1885 in Register Office, Paddington, London.206 Jane was born in 1853 in Sunderland, Co. Durham and died <1929> at age 76.

General Notes: A certain amount of mystery surrounds Jane's death. The George Clark & Co. share register suggests that she died sometime between 1929 & 1934 (only copies of every fifth year of George Clark & Co's share registers have been archived) but there is no record of her death to be found in the statutory records during those years so it may be that, like her son Richard, she died abroad possibly in France, a country of which she is said to have been particularly fond. Her youngest daughter, Dorothy, who had presumably been her companion during her later years, married in September 1930 which seems to suggest that Jane had died by that time, probably in 1929 or early 1930. (Dorothy was staying in an hotel in Gloucester Road at the time of her marriage).

Children from this marriage were:

   152 M    i. Major Richard Clark was born on 15 Dec 1885 in Marylebone, London 425 and died on 19 Aug 1937 in Bayeux, Calvados, France 426 at age 51.

Some things about his life were:

• Education: Sep 1903-28 Jan 1905, Royal Military College, Sandhurst. 427,428 Passed the RMC examination in July 1903 and was 22nd out of 155 cadets in his intake but he passed out 119th in Order of Merit. His position was, therefore, 'fair' as his RMC record states.

• Military Service: 28 Jan 1905-19 Mar 1921, Various Places. 429,430 Commissioned on leaving Royal Military College as 2nd Lieut. in 1st Battalion of The Norfolk Regiment. Gazetted 27 January 1905. Was promoted to Lieutenant 5 September 1906; Captain on 12 March 1913 and acting Major on 9 October 1918 being made substantive Major on his retirement on 19 March 1921.

Served with the West African Regiment from 25 April 1908 to 26 May 1911.

Apart from being a regimental officer, he was an instructor at RMC, Sandhurst in 1917 & 1918.

He was in the Regular Army Reserve of Officers as a Major in the Norfolk Regiment until the end of 1936.

• Grant of Administration: 9 Dec 1937, London, England. 431 Effects: £124 0s 11d

Richard married Lily Evanson, daughter of Colonel Richard Charles Evanson, on 2 Dec 1914 in St. James's Church, Norlands, London 432.,433 Lily was born <1891>.

   153 F    ii. Margaret Clark was born on 3 Mar 1887 in Barnstaple, North Devon 434 and died on 13 Apr 1982 in Petersfield, Hampshire 435,436 at age 95.

General Notes: Peggy was sent to a finishing school in Paris at the tender age of 15 (1902) where she made two lifelong friends; one of these had a daughter called Jean (later Jean Bell Hodson) to whom Peggy was godmother and who remained closely involved with her and her husband Malcolm ("Aunt Peg and Uncle Mac") for the rest of their lives. The other great friend was Vera Barr who married, in 1908, Edward Astley Rushton.(See note below)

Jean remembers Peggy as being extremely attractive (as the photographs show) and as some one who liked to have, and usually had, an admiring male audience. Jean modestly suggests that one of the reasons that she got on so well with her godmother (of whom she saw a great deal after her own mother died in 1939) was that she provided little competition on that front.

Peggy had a lifelong male friend known to Jean as "Eve" who was much in attendance and who took Peggy out a good deal. Eve was an early suitor who was not considered eligible by Peggy's parents, being in the Army and of no great means. Eve seems to have shared Peggy with Malcolm on a fairly harmonious basis, though it is said to have caused Malcolm much unhappiness at one time. However, they apparently agreed between themselves that Peggy's happiness should be paramount, so while Malcolm stayed in Hampshire running his antique shop (his hobby in retirement) Peggy was entertained, regularly, in London by Eve. Jean believed it to be an entirely platonic relationship.

Peggy was renowned for her ability to find servants when no one else could. At the end of her life she was looked by Mr and Mrs George Kirkby, he being, nominally, the chauffeur but in practice the general factotum and his wife being the cook and housekeeper. Its is thanks to George that some photographs of Peggy and Malcolm and of her mother, Jane, have survived; when asked to burn them he could not bring himself to do so and saved them and later passed them on to Jean.

Jean recalls Peggy only ever mentioning her half-sister Jane Westerberg and never her full brother, Richard, or sister, Dorothy.

NOTE
Vera Evelyn Barr was born in July 1887 so she was just a few months younger than Peggy. Vera's husband Edward was a Lieutenant in the Royal Navy when they married and went on to be a most successful naval officer reaching the rank of Vice-Admiral before he was tragically killed in a motorcar accident in 1935. At some stage the family adopted the surname Astley-Rushton. Vera died in 1974. 437

Some things about her life were:

• Grant of Administration: 4 Nov 1982, Winchester. 435 Estate:£134234.10; Nett: £130518.55

Peggy married Captain Malcolm Kenneth Grant R.N., O.B.E., son of Maurice Grant and Frances Aspden, in 1910 in Paddington, Middlesex.438 Malcolm was born in 1878 in Bayswater, London 439 and died on 21 Jan 1965 in Hampshire 440 at age 87.

General Notes: Malcolm's father Maurice was a London banker and Malcolm was one of Maurice & Frances's many children. Malcolm served in the Royal Navy rising eventually to the rank of Captain.

When he and Peggy were married they settled in London quite near where Malcolm's parents who lived in Lancaster Gate and the Post Office telephone directory of 1915 shows them living in 97 Gloucester Terrace. In about 1919 (Malcolm's entry disappears temporarily from the telephone directory in that year) they moved to an apartment (No: 19) in Old Court Mansions in Kensington High Street, W8, which was then owned by the departmental store Barkers. He and Peggy lived here until about 1949/50 when they moved to West Liss, near Petersfield in Hampshire. They stayed in London throughout WW II and were both Air Raid Wardens.

In West Liss Malcolm ran an antique shop for a time (he was, amongst other things, a very skilled wood carver) while Peggy tended her large garden no doubt with some  help. 437

Some things about his life were:

• Probate Granted: 14 Jul 1965, Winchester. 441 Estate: £33141

• Probate Granted: 8 Mar 1982, Winchester. 442 New grant giving wife sole reponsiblility

   154 F    iii. Dorothy Clark was born in 1892 in Crawley Down, East Grinstead 443 and died on 19 Dec 1961 in Hampshire 444,445 at age 69.

Some things about her life were:

• Will: 13 Apr 1961, Bordon, Hampshire. 446 In the event that she predeceased her husband, Ernest, Dorothy left her whole estate to him [this is what happened]. If he died before she did, she left one third of her estate to be divided between one of her brother-in-laws and her four sister-in-law's and the remainder to be divided between her husband's nephews and nieces of which there were six. She also made two bequests of £100 each; one to another of her brother-in-laws and the other to a friend from Margate "in remembrance of their kindness is to me."

[There is no indication anywhere in her Will that she and her husband had any issue and as Dorothy was 37 years old when they married, this perhaps not surprising.]

• Grant of Administration: 3 Apr 1961, Winchester. 447 Effects: £16,034 8s

Dorothy married Ernest Frederick Davis,448 son of James Frederick Davis and Bessie Mabel Bowley, on 2 Sep 1930 in Kensington Registry Office, Middlesex 448.,449 Ernest was born in 1897 in Camberwell, London.450

Marriage Notes: It has not been discovered where Ernest and Dorothy lived during the first few years of their married life but they had settled in the Margate area by 1934, first in Margate itself and later in the Botany Bay area of East Northdown.

When WW II started in 1939 they seem to evacuated to Cornwall if the evidence of Dorothy's Richardson Westgarth dividend payments are any indication; from 1940 these were directed to the National Westminster Bank at St Austell. This move is not surprising for the early days of that war their cottage in Botany Bay must have felt very exposed to attack.

The Post Office telephone directories show that they had returned to Dormer Cottage in Botany Bay by 1946 and continued to live there until 1960. This is confirmed by Richardson Westgarth's dividend payments. Sometime in 1960 they must have moved down to Bordon in Hampshire not far from Dorothy's sister Peggy. Here they seem to have lived in some form of "collective" residence called "Dormy House" (the witnesses to Dorothy's Will were also resident there) and it was here that Dorothy died in 1961.

General Notes: Sometime newsagent in Chingford.

60. Dorothy Clark was born on 8 Oct 1863 in 22 Park Place, Bishopwearmouth, Co. Durham,207 was baptised on 22 Feb 1865 in St Michael's Church, Bishopwearmouth,451 died on 4 Jan 1895 in Penshaw House, Penshaw, Co Durham 209,210 at age 31, and was buried in Bishopwearmouth Cemetery, Chester Road, Sunderland.211 The cause of her death was childbirth.

Dora married Richard Charles Thompson J.P. M.I.M.E., son of Robert Thompson and Sarah Barbar, on 7 Nov 1882 in St. Peter's Church, Hampstead, Middlesex 212,213.,214 Richard was born on 18 Aug 1857,452 died on 2 Aug 1918 in Dene House Nursing Home, Newcastle upon Tyne 453 at age 60, and was buried on 5 Aug 1918 in Bishopwearmouth Cemetery, Chester Road, Sunderland.211,452

Marriage Notes: It may seem strange that Richard and Dora who were both living in Sunderland area, should be married so far away in Hampstead. The explanation is probably that because Dora's mother had died earlier in the year and her father was not very well, she and Richard decided, or were persuaded to, get married in the local church of Dora's brother, Jack, whose wife at that time was Richard's sister Jane.

General Notes: Richard was the third generation of a family of shipbuilders. His grandfather, Robert, starting a family shipbuilding business which spawned two major shipbuilding firms in Sunderland. The original firm of Robert Thompson and Sons later became J. L. Thompson and Sons and a new firm of Robert Thompson, came into being when Richard's father, Robert, jun., left the original family firm in 1854 and set up on his own in a shipyard at Southwick where he had previously worked for the former occupier, John Candlish.

When George Clark moved his engine works to Southwick in 1872, it was to a site adjacent to the shipyard where Robert Thompson had pioneered the construction of composite ships and had built his first iron ship, the "Ireshope", in 1868. Later, Robert Thompson was also to acquire the Bridge Dockyard (on the other bank of the river from George Clark's Engine Works and just upstream of the Queen Alexandra bridge). From this dockyard ships had to be launched in a rather spectacular fashion, broadside, because the site was too narrow to allow them to be launched down a conventional slipway

When Richard and his brothers came into the family firm, it became known as Robert Thompson & Sons and it seems to have done a steady business in medium-sized steamers and the like for many years until it fell victim, as did so many other Sunderland shipbuilding yards, to the slump in the 1930s; the firm being closed down in 1933.

It is not known when Richard became chairman of the company but it may have been when his father died in 1910. He became a JP for the County in 1895 and French Consul at Sunderland in 1897. 454

Some things about his life were:

• Obituary: 2 Aug 1918, Sunderland, Co. Durham. 455,456 Richard's death was reported in a Sunderland newspaper on the day he died as follows:-

DEATH OF MR R. C .THOMPSON

Shipbuilder and French Consul

We regret to record the death of Mr Richard Charles Thompson, the well-known shipbuilder and French Consul, who died at a nursing home at Newcastle this morning. For the past year or so Mr Thompson's health had not been quite satisfactory, and some weeks ago he entered the nursing home and underwent an operation. He appeared to be making a recovery until a few days ago, when he had a relapse which proved fatal.

Mr Thompson was the eldest son of the late Mr Robert Thompson of West Hall, Whitburn, and was chairman of the directors of Messrs Robert Thompson & Sons, shipbuilders, of the Southwick and the Bridge Dockyard, he having entered the firm when a young man. He took a keen interest in the business, and also in the industry generally, was a member of the Wear Shipbuilders' Association, a member of the Institute of Mechanical Engineers, and a director of a number of industrial concerns. He was also a trustee of the George Hudson Charity and a Justice of the Peace for the county.

As French Consul in Sunderland, a position he occupied for 21 years, Mr Thompson gave every attention to the duties of the position, and until the recent failure of his health had done yeoman service in getting funds for the French Red Cross.

Since the outbreak of the year [sic] he had taken a very patriotic and self-sacrificing part. His residence, Morton House, Fence Houses, has been used as a hospital for wounded soldiers, and that he and his household have given their services to the cause, Mrs Thompson being commandant of the Morton House Hospital.

Mr Thompson took an interest in various sports and pastimes. He was a member, and at one time president, of the Burnmoor Cricket Club, and was very fond of shooting and fishing.

He was 61 years of age, was twice married, and leaves a widow and family of two sons and five daughters. One of the sons is in the Royal Flying Corps and the other in the submarine service.


Richard's death was also mentioned in The Times the following day under the headline "News in Brief"

• Funeral: 5 Aug 1918, Sunderland, Co. Durham. 452 Richard's funeral was reported in a Sunderland newspaper:-

FUNERAL OF MR R. C. THOMPSON

The funeral of the date [sic] Mr R. C. Thompson, of Morton House, Fence Houses, took place to-day, the internment being in the family grave at Bishopwearmouth Cemetery. The cortege left the residence about eleven o'clock, and arrived at the Cemetery soon after twelve. The service at the church and at the graveside was conducted by the Rev. S. M. Reynolds, Rector of Burnmoor. The coffin was of fumed oak, and the shield bore the inscription: "Richard Charles Thompson born August 18th, 1857, died August 2nd, 1918."

Amongst those who followed were: Capt. J. W. Thompson, R.A.F. (son), Lieut. C. R. Thompson, R. N. (son), Mr V. T. Thompson and Mr J. L. Thompson (brothers), Mr T. E. Parrington, Mr W. Haggie and Capt. H. Allison (sons-in-law), the outdoor servants, Mr V. C. S. W. Corbett, General H. D. Briggs, R.A.F. (brother-in-law), Mr E. H. Thompson (nephew), Mr J. H. H. Clark (brother-in-law), Mr A. Featherstonhaugh, Mr J. Clark, Mr H. M. Parrington, Mr Alan C. Thompson, Mr R. Thompson, the Mayor (Ald. W. F. Vint)....... [There then follows a long list of the "great and the good" of Sunderland including representatives from the firm of Messrs R. Thompson and Sons]

The secretary of the Royal Infirmary acknowledges with thanks the receipt of £2 2s from Mrs J. E. Thompson and Mr Robert Thompson, Thornhill Park, and also £5 to from Mrs Katherine Doxford, Greenbank, Hylton, in loving memory of Mr R. C. Thompson in lieu of flowers, and £2 2s and from Mr John Wallace Taylor.

• Probate Granted: 18 Feb 1919, London, England. 457 Effects: £92664 17s 7d, resworn; £105465 7s 11d.

Children from this marriage were:

   155 F    i. Dora Clark Thompson was born in 1883 in Bishopwearmouth, Co. Durham.458

Dora married Thomas Elliot Parrington in 1905 in Chester-le-Street, Co. Durham.459 Thomas was born in 1877 in Sunderland, Co. Durham.

   156 F    ii. Mildred Clark Thompson was born in 1885 in Bishopwearmouth, Co. Durham.460

Mildred married Hubert Allison in 1917 in Chester-le-Street, Co. Durham.461 Hubert was born in 1878 in Huddersfield.

   157 F    iii. Sybil Clark Thompson was born in 1887 in Bishopwearmouth, Co. Durham.462

Sybil married William Haggie, son of David Henry Haggie and Susan Elliott Blenkinsop, in 1911 in Chester-le-Street, Co. Durham.463 William was born <1879> in Sunderland, Co. Durham.

General Notes: Ropemaker

   158 F    iv. Majorie Thompson 464 was born <Jan 1890> and died on 9 Oct 1890.465

   159 M    v. Stewart Wyvol Thompson was born in 1892 466 and was baptised on 3 Aug 1892 in All Saints, Penshaw, Co Durham.467

   160 M    vi. Commander Charles Ralfe Thompson R.N. was born <4 Jan 1895> in Penshaw House, Penshaw, Co Durham,468 was baptised on 26 May 1895 in All Saints, Penshaw, Co Durham,469 and died on 11 Aug 1966 at age 71.

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71. Robert Clark 221 was born in 1867 in Moorsley, Co. Durham.221,223

Robert married.

The child from this marriage was:

+ 161 M    i. Robert Clark was born in 1900 and died in 1962 at age 62.

74. Mary Jane Clark was born <1870> in Belmont, Co. Durham.

Mary married Edward Henry Hughes in 1892 in Walsall, Staffordshire.227 Edward was born <1865> in Weston, Cheshire.

General Notes: At the time of 1891 & 1901 censuses, Edward's occupation was described as "Colliery Clerk".

Children from this marriage were:

   162 F    i. Margaret Hughes 470 was born <1893> in Brownhill, Staffordshire.470

   163 M    ii. Bertram E Hughes 470 was born <1896> in Brownhill, Staffordshire.470

   164 F    iii. Mary E Hughes 470 was born <1900> in Brownhill, Staffordshire.470

75. Hannah Elizabeth Clark 228 was born in 1871 in Belmont, Co. Durham.228,229

Hannah married John Dickinson, son of John Dickinson and Ruth Barton, in 1894 in Walsall, Staffordshire.230 John was born <1867> in Pelsall, Staffordshire.

Children from this marriage were:

   165 M    i. Walter Dickinson 228 was born <1896> in Brownhill, Staffordshire.228

   166 M    ii. Herbert Dickinson 228 was born <1898> in Brownhill, Staffordshire.228

   167 F    iii. Daisy Dickinson 228 was born in 1900 in Brownhill, Staffordshire.228

76. John Robert Clark was born <1873> in Moorsley, Co. Durham.

John married Henrietta Harvey 471 in 1896 in Litchfield.231 Henrietta was born in 1875 in Great Wyrley, Staffordshire.472

Children from this marriage were:

   168 M    i. James Albert Clark 471 was born <1898> in Great Wyrley, Staffordshire.471

   169 M    ii. Harold Robert Clark 471 was born in Jan 1901 in Great Wyrley, Staffordshire.471

110. Thomas Turnbull Clark was born in 1857 in Newcastle upon Tyne, Northumberland 270 and died after 24 Jan 1899 in lost at sea aboard S. S. Laughton.52,271

General Notes: Sometime Marine Engineer

Some things about his life were:

• Grant of Administration: 12 Jun 1899, Newcastle upon Tyne, Northumberland. 473 Effects: £427 17s 8d

Thomas married Ione Sharp,474 daughter of Robert Sharp and Elizabeth ———, in 1884 in Lambeth, London.272 Ione was born in 1862 in Kensington, Middlesex.474,475

Children from this marriage were:

   170 M    i. John Robson Clark was born in 1885 in Newcastle upon Tyne, Northumberland and died on 6 Oct 1967 in Dublin, Ireland at age 82.

Jack married Jean Kirkpatrick in 1915. Jean died <1941>.

+ 171 M    ii. Robert Sharp Clark 476 was born on 26 Feb 1888 in Whitley, Northumberland and died on 21 Mar 1969 476 at age 81.

111. Minnie Eugenie Clark was born on 26 Dec 1858 in Newcastle upon Tyne, Northumberland 273 and died on 6 Jan 1940 in Bromley, Kent 274 at age 81.

Some things about her life were:

• Probate Granted: 11 Apr 1940, Newcastle upon Tyne, Northumberland. 477 Effects: £329 0s 11d.

Minnie married Alfred John Patrick Farina, son of Charles Farina and Rosa Cotterill, in 1883 in Newcastle upon Tyne, Northumberland.275 Alfred was born <1837> in Maida Vale, London, died on 13 Jan 1914 in Oakwood House, Westmorland Road, Newcastle upon Tyne 478 at age 77, and was buried on 17 Jan 1914 in Elswick Cemetery, Newcastle upon Tyne.479

General Notes: After a rather colourful early career (see his obituary), Alfred setup as a consulting engineer in Newcastle where he practised for the rest of his life.

Some things about his life were:

• Obituary: London. 480 The Times published this obituary for Alfred:-

Mr ALFRED FARINA.

The death has occurred at Newcastle of Mr. Alfred Farina, who had a romantic career. He served as an engineer in the British Navy, which he left, to join the Spanish Navy. For heroism in saving a Spanish ship from foundering the Queen of Spain personally decorated him with the Cross for Naval Merit, also with the Star of Isabella for distinguished bravery at sea. He left the Spanish Navy to take part in the Italian War of Liberation, and served as a lieutenant on the private staff of Garibaldi, with he fought throughout the campaign, taking part in the siege of Messina and other important battles. At the close of the campaign Mr. Farina went to Newcastle and built up a lucrative business as a consulting engineer. His father-Mr. John Farina-was a prominent member of the London Stock Exchange, while his mother was a daughter of " Mile-end " Cotterill, former Lord Mayor of London. He was also a nephew of Henry Moses, the etcher and engraver..

COMMENT
The Times obituary writer was incorrect about Albert's father; he was not a prominent member of the London stock Exchange, he was in fact Charles Farina, a sometime starch manufacturer. Additionally, his mother was a member of a large Clerkenwell family and her father was a bacon & butter merchant.

• Probate Granted: 5 Mar 1914, Newcastle upon Tyne, Northumberland. 481 Effects: £3381 6s 9d

Children from this marriage were:

   172 M    i. James Victor Farina 482 was born in 1884 in Newcastle upon Tyne, Northumberland 483 and was baptised on 10 Oct 1884 in St Paul, Elswick, Northumberland.484

   173 F    ii. Mary Farina 482 was born in 1886 in Newcastle upon Tyne, Northumberland.485

   174 F    iii. Lily Caroline Clyde Farina was born in 1887 in Newcastle upon Tyne, Northumberland.486

   175 F    iv. Theo Eugenie Farina 482 was born in 1888 in Newcastle upon Tyne, Northumberland.487

   176 F    v. Minnie Alfreda Farina 482 was born in 1891 in Newcastle upon Tyne, Northumberland.482,488

   177 F    vi. Ione Patricia Farina 482 was born in 1893 in Newcastle upon Tyne, Northumberland.489

   178 M    vii. Thomas Garibaldi Farina 482 was born on 23 Nov 1894 in Newcastle upon Tyne, Northumberland 482,490 and died on 28 Nov 1963 in Carshalton 482 at age 69.

Thomas married Margaret Edna Aikman on 25 Jul 1925 in Newcastle upon Tyne, Northumberland. Margaret was born on 9 Mar 1900 in Cardiff, Glamorgan, Wales and died on 6 Jun 1991 in Bedford, Bedfordshire at age 91.

   179 F    viii. Verita Nanette Farina was born in 1896 in Newcastle upon Tyne, Northumberland 491 and died in 1896 in Newcastle upon Tyne, Northumberland.492

   180 M    ix. Alfred John Oswald Farina was born in 1899 in Newcastle upon Tyne, Northumberland 493 and died in South Africa.


112. Lily Coral Clark was born on 8 Dec 1863 and died circa 1950 at age 87.

Lily married De Lisle Carey, son of Francis Edward Carey and Emilia De Lisle, on 22 Nov 1883 in Newcastle upon Tyne, Northumberland.276 De was born on 18 Jul 1861 in St Peter Port, Guernsey and died in 1943 in St Peter Port, Guernsey at age 82.

Children from this marriage were:

   181 F    i. Eva Augusta Carey was born on 17 Aug 1884 in Newcastle upon Tyne, Northumberland and died in 1972 at age 88.

Eva married Edward Hugh Bent Norrish, son of Edward Comins Norrish and Margaret Agnes Hutton, on 6 Apr 1910 in Tynemouth.494 Edward was born in 1882 in Shobrooke, Devonshire and died in 1950 at age 68.

Marriage Notes: Issue: one son & three daughters

   182 M    ii. Francis de Lisle Carey was born on 11 Sep 1886 in Newcastle upon Tyne, Northumberland and died on 6 Feb 1934 at age 47.

Francis married Ada Mabel Bowden-Smith, daughter of Walter Baird Bowden-Smith and Beatrice Caroline L Humphrys, on 25 Apr 1908. Ada was born in 1883 and died in 1969 at age 86.

Marriage Notes: 2 sons & 2 daughters (incl. Joyce Carey ?? & Marguerite Woodward, née Carey, married 1946)

   183 F    iii. Hope Carey was born on 27 Nov 1894 in Whitley, Northumberland and died in 1983 at age 89.

Hope married Revd Lionel Warren Hart, son of Henry Albert Hart and Maude Jane I Scott, on 6 Feb 1923. Lionel was born in 1894 in Albury, Surrey and died in 1975 at age 81.

Marriage Notes: Issue: three sons

   184 M    iv. De Lisle Carey was born on 23 Sep 1901 in Whitley, Northumberland and died on 1 Sep 1998 at age 96.

De married Margaret Winifred Ross on 12 May 1926. Margaret was born in 1896.

Marriage Notes: Issue: two daughters

113. Theo Clark was born in 1865 in Newcastle upon Tyne, Northumberland.

Theo married Frederick Lawton Clarence, son of Thomas Clarence and Jane Anne Todner, in 1891 in Newcastle upon Tyne, Northumberland.277 Frederick was born <1873> in Newcastle upon Tyne, Northumberland.

The child from this marriage was:

   185 M    i. Thomas Frederick Clarence was born in 1894 in Tynemouth.

117. Victor William Clark was born in 1874 in Newcastle upon Tyne, Northumberland.

Victor married Ellen Elizabeth Hazard in 1895 in Newcastle upon Tyne, Northumberland.278 Ellen was born in 1875 in Newcastle upon Tyne, Northumberland.

The child from this marriage was:

   186 M    i. Thomas Clark was born in 1896 in Benwell, Northumberland.

120. Kate Annabel Clark 279 was born in 1870 in Newcastle upon Tyne, Northumberland.282

Kate married John James Nicholson, son of Peter William Nicholson and Mary Jane Quay, in 1890 in Newcastle upon Tyne, Northumberland.283 John was born <1870> in Broughton, Cumberland.495

Children from this marriage were:

   187 F    i. Mary Helena Nicholson 496 was born in 1892 in Newcastle upon Tyne, Northumberland.496

   188 M    ii. James Quay Nicholson 496 was born in 1894 in Newcastle upon Tyne, Northumberland.496

   189 M    iii. Walter Nicholson 496 was born in 1896 in Newcastle upon Tyne, Northumberland.496

   190 M    iv. John William Nicholson was born <1900> in London.


127. George Clark was born on 25 Aug 1865 in 14 North Bridge Street, Monkwearmouth, Co. Durham,322 was baptised on 14 Sep 1865 in St Peter's Church, Monkwearmouth, Co. Durham,497 died on 21 Jan 1937 in The Green, Seaton Carew, West Hartlepool at age 71, and was buried on 23 Jan 1937 in Bishopwearmouth Cemetery, Chester Road, Sunderland.

Some things about his life were:

• Education: Sep 1878-Dec 1882, Repton School, Derbyshire. 344 Was in Rev. W. W. Fowler's House

• Will: 11 Dec 1936, West Hartlepool, Co. Durham. Left his estate in trust; his wife, Mabel, benefiting from the interest from it during her lifetime and on her death half the estate was to be passed to his son, Geoffrey, the remainder being held in trust with the interest from it going to his daughter, Violet, during her lifetime. If Violet died without issue, the trust fund was to revert to Geoffrey or his heirs.

• Obituary: 22 Jan 1937, Sunderland, Co. Durham. 498 DEATH OF MR GEORGE CLARK

Southwick Engineering Firm Chairman

Senior member of Bench


The death occurred at The Green, Seaton Carew, yesterday, of Mr George Clark chairman of Messrs George Clark (1936), Limited, the well known firm of marine engineers of Southwick.

Mr Clark, who was 71, had had a lifelong connection with Southwick,. He was a grandson of the founder of the firm, Mr George Clark, who established the marine engineering works at Southwick, in 1850, and the son of Mr George Clark, who for many years was manager of the works.

Mr George Clark, the third generation, was educated at Repton School, served his apprenticeship with the firm as an engineer and also studied at Glasgow University. Later he held a managerial position at the Southwick works and in 1911 left to become marine engine sales manager for Messrs Richardsons and Westgarth & Co. Ltd., at Hartlepool, becoming a director in 1918.

He held that position for many years until in 1930 he returned to Messrs George Clark's works as general manager.

Last year, when the company was re-formed as George Clark (1936), Limited, Mr Clark was appointed chairman and managing director.

He was a nephew of Mr J. H. H. Clark who was Chairman of the old company for many years.

URBAN COUNCIL CHAIRMAN


For many years Mr Clark lived at Southwick and he served for a long period on the Urban Council, including a term as Chairman. Before going to live at Seaton Carew he resided at Cleadon Hall for a time.

He was in Sunderland as recently as Friday, and became ill on returning home.

Mr Clark was one of the founders and leading member of the old Amateur Operatic Society. He played Grossmithian parts in the Society's Gilbert and Sullivan productions.

Mr Clark was the senior member of the Sunderland Borough Bench of Magistrates, having been appointed in 1901, but he seldom attended the court and had not done so for very many years.

For many years he was a member of the old Sunderland Volunteer Artillery and rose to the rank of Lieut-Colonel.

Mr Clark was a member of the Institute of Mech. Engineers, the Institute of Naval Architects, the Institute of Marine Engineers, and the North-East Coast Institute of Shipbuilders and Engineers.

He leaves a widow (a daughter of the late Mr Joseph Thompson, timber merchant), a son (Mr G. Geoffrey Clark, of Dorset), and a daughter, Mrs Spence, of Seaton Carew.

The internment will take place at Bishopwearmouth cemetery tomorrow morning.

• Probate Granted: 6 Apr 1937, Durham. 499 Effects: £21786 16s 6d.

George married Mabel Gertrude Thompson, daughter of Joseph Thompson and Esther Eleanor Crewe, on 3 Jun 1890 in Christ Church, Bishopwearmouth, Co. Durham.324 Mabel was born in 1867 in Sunderland, Co. Durham and died on 10 May 1949 in Poole at age 82.

Some things about her life were:

• Probate Granted: 24 Nov 1949, Durham. 500 Effects: £2733 19s 7d.

Children from this marriage were:

+ 191 M    i. George Geoffrey Clark L.R.I.B.A. was born on 10 Jan 1893,501 died on 26 Oct 1957 in Devon 502 at age 64, and was buried in Clyst St. George, Exeter, Devon.


   192 F    ii. Violet Mabel Clark was born on 19 Mar 1903 and died on 31 Dec 1991 in Balla Wray Nursing Home, High Wray, Ambleside at age 88.

Violet married Edward M. Sinclair Spence, son of — Spence, in 1933 in Kensington, Middlesex.504 The marriage ended in Separation. Sinclair was born in 1906 in Southampton.

128. James Chalmers Clark was born on 28 Mar 1868 in 14 North Bridge Street, Monkwearmouth, Co. Durham,322 was baptised on 5 Aug 1868 in St Peter's Church, Monkwearmouth, Co. Durham,505 died on 1 Dec 1931 in Wimbledon, Surrey 326 at age 63, and was buried on 4 Dec 1931 in Gap Road, Cemetery, Wimbledon.

Some things about his life were:

• Education: Apr 1882-Jul 1885, Repton School, Derbyshire. Was in J. H. Gurney's House ( Latham House)

• Will: 24 Oct 1919, Sunderland, Co. Durham. Left his entire estate to his wife if she survived him, otherwise it was to be held in trust for his daughter, Majorie May until she reached the age of twenty one.

• Report of death: 4 Dec 1931, Wimbledon, Surrey. 506 The Wimbledon Borough News for December 4th, 1931 reported James's death:-

MR J. C. CLARK

The Death occurred in a Nursing Home on Tuesday of Mr James Chalmers Clark, Managing Director of the firm of George Clark Ltd, Marine Engineers of Sunderland, who had lived in Dora-road, Wimbledon since his retirement.
Mr Clark leaves a widow and one daughter, was 63 years of age. He was a son of the late Mr George Clark of Sunderland (with whom he began in the 100 years-old business) and Mrs Clark who is still living. He was the nephew of Sir Alfred Chalmers and an old Reptonian.
He was compelled to retire on account of ill-health, but until the last he retained an association with the business.
The funeral will take place today at Gap Road Cemetery. The arrangements being carried out by Messrs. Ely of Wimbledon.

• Probate Granted: 1 Apr 1932, Durham. 507 Effects: £22502 12s 8d.

James married Alice Heywood Shiel, daughter of John Shiel and Mary Reay, on 19 Dec 1908 in Sunderland, Co. Durham.327 Alice was born on 3 May 1886 in Coxlodge, Northumberland 508,509 and died on 22 May 1972 in Bognor Regis, Sussex 510,511 at age 86.

Some things about her life were:

• Probate Granted: 28 Sep 1972, Brighton, Sussex. 512 Effects: £79477

The child from this marriage was:

+ 193 F    i. Marjorie May Clark was born on 7 Oct 1911 in 14 Rowlandson Terrace, Sunderland, Co. Durham, was baptised on 2 Nov 1911 in Christ Church, Bishopwearmouth, Co. Durham, and died on 17 Apr 1991 at age 79.


129. Jessie Clark was born on 3 Mar 1869 in 14 North Bridge Street, Monkwearmouth, Co. Durham,322 was baptised on 14 Apr 1869 in St Peter's Church, Monkwearmouth, Co. Durham,514 and died on 27 Dec 1970 in Tirril Lodge, Tirril, Nr Penrith 329,330 at age 101.

Some things about her life were:

• Education: Sep 1883 to <1886>, Cheltenham, Gloucestershire. 515 Was admitted to Cheltenham Ladies' College in its early days when Miss Beale was Headmistress. Boarded at Roderic House, one of the first boarding houses which was then under the supervision of Miss Elizabeth Draper and her two sisters Susan and Catherine who were joint heads of Roderics from 1883 to 1911.

• Confirmation: 24 Mar 1885, St Matthew's, Cheltenham.

• 100th Birthday: 3 Mar 1969, Tirril Lodge, Tirril, Nr Penrith. 516,517 The Herald, a local Penrith paper, reported Jessie's 100th birthday in its March 8th edition as follows: -

AT 100, TIRRIL LADY STILL KNITS, ENJOYS T.V.

With a family gathering which included eight grandchildren, four great grandchildren and relatives from Canada and Italy, Mrs Jessie Wancke on Monday celebrated her 100th birthday at the home of her daughter, Mrs R V Green, Tirril Lodge, Tirril, where she has been living for two years.

Born in Sunderland, she is the daughter of the late Mr George Clark, head of the firm of Marine Engineers, George Clark Limited, Southwick, Sunderland. One of a family of eight, she has one surviving brother who lives in Canada.

Mrs Wancke was educated at Cheltenham Ladies College, under the headship of the famous Miss Dorothea Beale, and afterwards at a finishing school in France.

She married Mr Elof Wancke who was Swedish and Finnish consul in Sunderland for over 30 years. While she lived there she took an interest in church activities and was a presiding member of the Mother's Union for years.

When her husband died, Mrs Wancke went to live with her son, Mr Alan Wancke, who farms at Bardon Mill, Northumberland, and later at the Crown Hotel, Wetheral. Mrs Wancke has good health and can still knit and read and enjoys watching television.

She has twin daughters - Mrs Green and Mrs John Bowden, Wydon Eals, Haltwhistle - and her son, Mr Alan Wancke and eight grandchildren, and four great grandchildren, all of who were at the family celebration.

She received many congratulatory cards and greetings, as well as flowers and other gifts.

The Cumberland Evening News and Star also featured Jessie's birthday on their front page under the headline "JESSIE, 100, KEEPS BUSY ON HER BIRTHDAY" in their edition on Monday, March 3, 1969

—————————————————————————————


The Eldon column of The Evening Chronicle of March 3rd 1969 wrote* of Jessie's 100th birthday as follows:-

"MRS JESSIE WANCKE

Music-loving Mrs Jessie Wancke could never overlook an anniversary of the birth of Sir Henry Wood, founder of the Proms.

She was also born on the same day as the man who ultimately brought a new dimension to British music and today there are 100 candles on her birthday cake.

This spry centenarian now lives at Tirril Lodge, near Penrith, but her early life was spent in the North-East and she's proud of the contribution her family made to its prosperity.

She is the granddaughter of George Clark, the founder of the world-famous Wearside marine engineering company; the man who launched be first iron ship the Wear ever built.

The Clark's house, Ashcroft Towers, in fact, was the centre of Sunderland social life at the turn of the century and it was there that Jessie Clark, as she was then, met the tall, bearded Elof Wancke, a Swedish timber merchant who was importing pit props for the Durham coalfield.

HONOURED

Elof was obviously very much taken with the young Miss Clark for, after meeting again several times, he followed her to the South of France where she was on holiday, proposed to her and was accepted.

He was the Swedish vice-consul in Sunderland for more than 30 years and during that time was honoured by the King of Sweden with the Order of the Vasa (the old Swedish dynasty).

Mrs Wancke has been a widow now for 26 years, but she has a close-knit family of twin daughters, a son, eight grandchildren and four great grandchildren, all of who are helping her to celebrate her 100th birthday today.

Her health is excellent and she spends much of her time reading, knitting and watching television. She is particularly fond of sport and during Wimbledon fortnight you'll find her conversing expertly and interestingly about tennis players.

Up to three years go she favoured a long morning walk, and this, with a placid outlook and not smoking, she says is her recipe for longevity."

*The actual author of the piece was her grandson, Charles Bowden, then a journalist with the Newcastle Journal.

• Cremation: 31 Dec 1970, Carlisle Crematorium. 518

Jessie married ,519,520 son of Johan Fredrik Wancke and Maria Ulrika Karolina Widing, on 29 Jun 1907 in St Mary's Church, Harrow on the Hill. Elof was born on 17 Apr 1855 in Karlshamn, Blekinge Län, Sweden,519,520 died on 1 Jun 1943 in Thorngrafton, Bardon Mill, Northumberland 521 at age 88, and was buried on 4 Jun 1943 in St Cuthbert's Churchyard, Beltingham, Northumberland.330

Some things about their marriage were: 

• Wedding: 29 Jun 1907, Harrow, Middlesex. 522 A local Harrow newspaper reported Jessie's wedding:-

MARRIAGE OF MISS CLARK

A WEDDING IN SUNSHINE

June favoured with an unusual brilliance the wedding that was celebrated on Saturday in the Harrow Parish Church. It was the last marriage of the month, and nothing could have been more welcome than the generous share of sunshine which welcomed all witnesses of the happy celebration. There were, therefore, many well wishes who assembled in the church at the marriage of Miss Jessie Clark, daughter of the late Mr. George Clark, of Sunderland, and Mrs. Clark of Kenton Lodge, Kenton, to Mr. Elof U. Vanck (sic).

The pleasant drive from Kenton to Harrow was accomplished by numerous guests, and at the time for the arrival of the bride and her attendant bridesmaid there was a good company occupying the centre of the Church. Mr. A. Gurney was at the organ, and selections were paid by him through the period of waiting, the Löhengrin "Bridal March" being played immediately the bridal party arrived.

Miss Clark wore a dress [of] Brussels applique lace over white satin, and a large white crinoline hat with white feathers. Her ornaments were a diamond pendant and turquoise and diamond bracelet, the gift of the bridegroom, as was her beautiful bouquet. Miss Clark, the bride's sister, was dressed in champagne coloured striped chiffon with pink chene sash, a large brown hat with shaded feathers, brown to pink. Her pearl and turquoise brooch was the bridegroom's gift, and she also carried a pink rose bouquet. Mrs. Clark, mother of the bride, wore a brown eau-de-soie dress over pink, a pink bonnet, and carried pink roses.

The Rev. F. Wayland Joyce, Vicar of the parish, conducted the marriage service, the Rev. F. G. Harvie assisting. The choir were also in attendance, and the beautiful wedding hymn was sung at the commencement of the service. Mr. Charles Atkinson, of Lylam-on-Tyne, was the best man. The wedding service concluded, Mendlessohn's wedding music played the newly-married couple from the church, and the bells above gave out their music to the sun-lit air. The guests were received at Kenton Lodge, and numerous congratulations accorded to Mr. and Mrs. Vanck. A motor tour forms the first part of the honeymoon before Mr. and Mrs. Vanck leave for Sweden. The bride wore a travelling dress of Nattice blue taffeta, a brown hat and tussore cloak with brown leather collar.

Mr. and Mrs. Vanck received many handsome and numerous presents.

NOTE
Charles Atkinson, who was Elof's best man, actually lived at Wylam-on-Tyne and seems to have remained a bachelor because Alan Wancke remembers him visiting the Laurels (the Wancke's house in Sunderland) every year for the Wancke's New Year's Eve party and going home to Wylam by train late at night when it was over still in full evening dress. Charles was obviously a lifelong friend of Elof's and in all likelihood he was a member of the Atkinson family who ran a timber merchant's business in Newcastle.

Some things about his life were:

• Life's work: 1873 to 1930, Various Places. 523,524,525 Elof is reputed to have come to England in about 1873 when he was 18 years old. It is not known why he and his brothers came to England; perhaps the career prospects in southern Sweden at that time were poor which encouraged them to look abroad or there may have been some previous connection with the country through their father, Johan, who was reputed to have been a merchant. Whatever the reason, he and his four brothers all found employment in England; two of them in the timber trade.

Elof probably came over with his elder brother, Herman, and possibly Jonas as they were all of an age to find employment. His two younger brothers, Hjalmar and Alfred, joining them later. Elof initially found employment in West Hartlepool either working for an English timber merchant or on his own account as a Timber Agent. He remained in West Hartlepool until 1879 or 1880 and then moved to Newcastle upon Tyne where he set up an office on Quayside. At that time he was working as a Timber Agent or Broker and he stayed in Newcastle until 1890 when he moved his business and home to Sunderland.

What prompted his moved to Sunderland is not known. Perhaps it was the offer of the Swedish vice consulship there or, perhaps, he needed more space for his business. The change from being an Agent or Broker to being a Timber Merchant probably necessitated premises on which to hold stock and it may be that such premises were more readily available in Sunderland. Whatever the case, E U Wancke & Co set up office in 26 West Sunniside and remained in business there until about 1930 when Elof retired.

The success of E U Wancke & Co, at least certainly in its early days, lay in Elof's ability to import Swedish timber to be used in the coal mines of Northumberland and Durham, mostly in the form of pit props or shoring. Whether or not the business ever developed other significant outlets is hard to say but it does not seem to have continued after Elof retired; perhaps by then the growing use of metal pit props and shuttering had eroded the business base.

From his early days in Sunderland, Elof was vice consul for Sweden and, for a time, Norway. He continued in this role for Sweden until he retired and was decorated by the King of Sweden with the Order of Vasa. When first appointed vice consul for Sweden, he was disappointed to find that there was no official court uniform to wear on ceremonial occasions so he designed one himself and the photograph accompanying this biography is of him in that uniform in 1891.

His daughter, Phyllis, used to quote him as saying that the first £10,000 were the most difficult to make. History does not relate how long it took him to achieve his first £10,000 but it would not be surprising if it coincided with his moved from Newcastle to Sunderland in 1890 when he was about 35 years old.

• Residences: 1873 to 1943, Various Places. 526,527 In all probability, Elof spent his early days in England living in lodgings. Apart from the financial aspect, he was a bachelor and a lodging house would have been a sensible place to live for such a person. Certainly, in 1881 he is to be found in lodgings, in Elswick, Newcastle upon Tyne, with his brothers, Hjalmar and Alfred. Later he moved down the Tyne to lodge at Wylam from where he commuted to his office in Newcastle.

It was not until he moved to Sunderland that he had his own establishment. By that time he sister, Ivis, had come to England and was able to keep house for him. They lived at 10 Woodside until she married Karl Pyhlson and then he moved to 5 Woodside where he stayed (presumably with a housekeeper until he married) until 1913 when he and Jessie moved to 20 Thornhill Gardens, otherwise known as "The Laurels".

Some time around 1900 he acquired a property called Stampen outside Karlshamn where the family used to go in the summer. It was sold after WWI and summer visits to Karlshamn were then spent staying as paying guests with a widowed family friend called Gerda Dalh who needed the money.

When Sunderland was bombed in the early part of WW II, Elof, Jessie and their daughter Chrissie, closed up The Laurels and went to live at Thorngrafton, a property that Elof had recently bought for his son Alan to farm. Here Elof died in 1943.

The Laurels was eventually sold in 1956 for £650.

• Report of death: 5 Jun 1943, Hexham. 528 A local newspaper reported Elof's death as follows:-

Bardon Mill Death of
Former Swedish Consul

The death has taken place at Thorngrafton, Bardon Mill, where he had been residing since the outbreak of war, of Mr Elos (sic) U. Wancke (88), for 39 years Swedish Vice Consul at Sunderland.

He came to England when he was 18 years of age and was a timber importer at West Hartlepool and Newcastle prior to being appointed Vice Consul at Sunderland. On his retirement, the King of Sweden decorated him with the Vasa Order.

Children from this marriage were:

   194 F    i. Phyllis Hildegarde Wancke 518 was born on 14 Nov 1908 in 5 Woodside, Sunderland, Co. Durham,529 was baptised on 15 Nov 1908 in Christ Church, Bishopwearmouth, Co. Durham,530 and died on 4 Jan 1994 in Penrith, Cumberland 518 at age 85. The cause of her death was bronchopneumonia - cerebravascular accident. (Twin)

Some things about her life were:

• Cremation: 10 Jan 1994, Carlisle Crematorium.

Phyllis married Richard Vidal Green,532 son of Richard James Green and Madeline Vidal, on 4 Jun 1932 in Christ Church, Bishopwearmouth, Co. Durham.531 Dick was born on 21 Feb 1906 in 9 Roker Park Road, Sunderland, Co. Durham 533 and died on 1 Jan 1988 in Smithy Cottage, Tirril, Penrith 534,535 at age 81. The cause of his death was acute pericarditis - bronchopneumonia.

Some things about their marriage were:
 

• Wedding: 4 Jul 1932, Sunderland, Co. Durham. 536 Phyllis' and Dick's wedding was reported in a local newspaper:-

SUNDERLAND BRIDE

HONEYMOON TO BE SPENT IN PARIS

The wedding took place at Christ Church, Sunderland, on Saturday, of Miss Phyllis Hildegarde Wancke, twin daughter of Mr and Mrs E U Wancke of the The Laurels, Sunderland, and Mr Richard Vidal Green, son of Mr and Mrs R J Green of Grange Terrace, Sunderland and Winshields, Bardon Mill.

Given way by her father, the bride wore a dress of old Brussels lace over satin, with a veil lent by the mother of the bridegroom. Her flowers were pink roses.

She was attended by Miss Christine Wancke (twin sister), Miss Du Pre, of Heathfield, Sussex; Miss Barbara Hett, of Darlington; and Miss Emily Smith of Stockholm, who all wore apple-green lace dresses and green floral headdresses and carried bouquets of sweet peas.

Mr H V Green (brother of the bridegroom) was best man, and Mr Alan Wancke (brother of the bride), Mr Ralph Powell (cousin of the bride), and Dr Frank Hubbersty were ushers. After a reception at the home of the bride's parents, the bride and bridegroom left for a honeymoon in Paris.

Some things about his life were:

• Education: Sep 1919-Dec 1923, Radley, Oxfordshire. 537 Dick was in Stone's Tutors (boarding house) at St. Peter's College, Radley; the Rev. Francis Stone was his mother's first cousin.

• Employment: Jun 1926-Sep 1926, Canada. 538 In 1926, having not settled into any permanent employment after leaving Radley, Dick's parents thought it would be a good idea if he went out to Canada to see what opportunities there were out there. His mother had a cousin, Guy Stone, who fruit farmed at Beamsville, Ontario, and there were other relatives farming in Canada, so it seemed a sensible place to visit.

Dick duly arrived in Canada in June 1926 having sailed on the Canadian Pacific's Montcalm. At first, he went to work for the Stone family but, by all accounts, the visit was not a great success, amongst other things Mrs Stone was a strict lady - very much the vicar's daughter - and Dick's dalliances with her maids may not have have gone down well with her. Whatever the case, Dick left the Stones and joined a thrashing gang for the harvest with them he gained little experience in farming but much in the ways of men.

To the disappointment of his father, who had been hoping that he might settle in Canada or at least spend longer there, Dick returned to London in late September of 1926 on the Cunard line's Caronia, having sailed from New York. He always seemed to look back on his experiences in Canada with affection; his trip there was, as things turned out, his only real adventure.

• Occupation: farmer, 1927-1955. 539 Initially on his return from Canada, Dick became a pupil on a farm in North Yorkshire and then in 1929 his father bought Winshields, a farm near Bardon Mill in Northumberland, here Dick carried on mixed farming until 1955.

• Political Activity: Bet 1946 and 1952, Haltwhistle, Northumberland. 540 Dick was elected to the Haltwhistle Rural District Council as a Progressive member for Henshaw ward in the first postwar RDC elections in April 1946.

In a 75% poll, Dick beat the Socialist contender by 205 votes to 139 and started a seven year stint in local politics. As Henshaw was mainly a mining community, Dick did well to be elected there as the tide was running strongly for the Socialists after the war; he was successful because he was well-known to the electorate, having spent much time over the years in the local pubs, and stood, despite the "Progressive" label, as an independent (ie one without affiliations to the Conservative or Labour parties).

In 1949 Dick was voted Chairman of the RDC, ousting, to everyone's surprise, the previous Labour Chairman of some years standing by one vote. The latter, Miss Margaret Fleming, was the leading light in the local Labour Party, having been at one time the local secretary and also being then the district's member of the County Council. Dick and Miss Fleming had many disagreements on council policy but Dick was good at chairing meetings and reconciling opposing factions and, as a result, he was re-elected Chairman each year until he stood down from the Council in June 1952.

Ironically, on becoming Chairman, Dick found himself an ex officio member of the local Bench which two years earlier had fined him £5 for killing a pig without the necessary licence which the food regulations after the war required.

• Cremation: 8 Jan 1988, Carlisle Crematorium.

   195 F    ii. Jessie Christine Wancke was born on 14 Nov 1908 in 5 Woodside, Sunderland, Co. Durham and died on 20 Jun 1992 in Hexham General Hospital, Hexham at age 83. (Twin)

Chrissie married John Ferguson Bowden, son of Thomas George Bowden and Ada Jarvis.

Some things about their marriage were:

• Wedding: 4 Jun 1942, Beltingham, Bardon Mill, Northumberland. 541 The Hexham Courant of Saturday, June 13, 1942 reported, under "Local Weddings", Chrissie's and John's wedding as follows:-

BELTINGHAM BRIDE

The Rev. C. W. Herring, Vicar of Beltingham officiated at the wedding in St Cuthbert's Church, Beltingham, of Miss Jessie Christine Wancke, twin daughter of Mr and Mrs Wancke, The Laurels, Sunderland, and Mr John Ferguson Bowden, only son of Mr and Mrs T. G. Bowden, Wydon Eals, Haltwhistle.

Given away by her father, the bride wore a dress of blue marocain and carried a bouquet of pink carnations.

Mr A. H. Wancke, brother of the bride, was best man.

   196 M    iii. Alan Hamilton Wancke was born on 29 May 1914 in 20 Thornhill Gardens, Sunderland, Co. Durham,520 died on 18 Jan 2003 in Haltwhistle Hospital, Haltwhistle 542 at age 88, and was buried on 24 Jan 2003 in St Cuthbert's Churchyard, Beltingham, Northumberland.543

Some things about his life were:

• Education: Bet 1927 and 1931, Edinburgh. 544 Alan was at Fettes College. He went there in 1927 and left in July 1931 when he was in Va mods.

• Education: In 1936 & 1937, Newcastle upon Tyne, Northumberland. 544 Alan spent some time as a farm pupil and then took an Diploma in Agriculture from Durham University at Armstrong College, Newcastle.

• Life's work: Bet. 1937 & c.1980, Various Places. 545 Alan was a farmer, initially, in Yorkshire growing potatoes but in 1939 his father bought Thorngrafton, a farm near Bardon Mill in Northumberland, where Alan carried on mixed farming for many years before concentrating on milk production in the 1960s.

For many years Alan took a keen and active interest in the NFU and was chairman of the local (Haltwhistle) branch several times and was also, for a time, an executive delegate to the NFU for the local farming community.

• Obituary: 31 Jan 2003, Hexham. 546 A local newspaper published this obituary for Alan:-

Farmer and union delegate joined the Home Guard

A FARMER who was described by those who knew him as “a gentleman” has died peacefully at the age of 88.
Alan Wancke, of Thorngrafton House, was a highly respected member of the Tynedale community and served as an executive delegate for the National Farmers' Union.
He died, following a short illness, at Hexham Hospital last Saturday.
Alan was born in Sunderland in 1914, the son of the then Swedish vice-consul Elof and his wife Jessie, of the world-famous Clark engineering family.
He was educated at Fettes College, Edinburgh, until he was 17 and spent many of his school holidays working on farms.
Upon leaving school, Alan worked first on a farm in East Lothian, before doing a pre-college year at Hardriding Farm in Bardon Mill.
In 1933 he went to Armstrong College and in his summer breaks he worked in Sweden at the famous Alfa Laval farm.
His father bought Thorngrafton, a dairy farm, in 1939 for £4,300 and Alan took up residence there the following year.
He immediately become involved with the National Farmers'Union and the Bardon Mill platoon of the Home Guard, where he trained recruits and cadets.
In 1945 Alan was appointed chairman of the Haltwhistle branch of the NFU and later became a regular delegate to the county executive.
Four years later he met Cynthia Liddell, daughter of John Liddell, the largest agricultural engineers in the Haltwhistle area, and shortly afterwards the couple were married.
Alan was a keen rugby fan and, as well as playing for Tynedale, he made regular trips to Murrayfield to watch the Scotland team's matches.
He and Cynthia also loved sailing and were among the founder members of the Bassenthwaite Sailing Club in the Lake District.
Alan leaves his wife, three children and seven grand-children.


NOTE: There are two errors in the above obituary which were corrected in the following edition. First, Alan died at Haltwhistle Hospital and secondly, Cynthia's father was R. Thompson Liddell.

Alan married Anne Cynthia Liddell, daughter of Robert Thompson Liddell and Cynthia Skelton.

Some things about their marriage were:
 

• Wedding: 16 Jun 1956, Haltwhistle, Northumberland. 547 Cynthia's and Alan's wedding was reported in the Hexham Courant:-

Picture gown for
Haltwhistle bride

A picture gown of lace with heart-shaped neckline and a tulle veil loaned by her mother were worn by Miss Anne Cynthia Liddell, of Haltwhistle, for her wedding in the Church of the Holy Cross, Haltwhistle, on Saturday to Mr Alan Hamilton Wancke, of Bardon Mill.

She carried a spray of white rosebuds and lilies of the valley.

The bride is the only daughter of Mr and Mrs R. Thompson Liddell, of Eden Holme, Haltwhistle, and the bridegroom the only son of the late Mr E. U. Wancke, of Thorngrafton, Bardon Mill.

The Vicar of Beltingham with Henshaw, the Rev. C. W. Herring officiated assisted by the Rev. G. H. Elliott, Curate of Haltwhistle.

The church decorations, arranged by Mrs W. A. Hastewell of Bardon Mill, featured masses of rhododendrons, lilac, pink and white pyrethrums gypsophila, and the service included the hymns, "Praise my soul the king of heaven." "Love divine all loves excelling." "The king of love my shepherd is." and the 23rd Psalm.

The bride was given away by her father. Her two bridesmaids were Miss Valerie Liddell, of Hall Meadows, Haltwhistle, and this Margery Campbell, of Jarrow. They walk dresses of pale pink figured Swiss organdie with matching headdresses. Their bouquets were of pink rosebuds and carnations.

Mr Stuart Halbert, of Ashcroft, Haltwhistle, was best man, and Mr John Liddell, of Hall Meadows, Haltwhistle and, Mr John Gregg, The Grange, Haltwhistle, and Mr David Mawson, of Houghton, Carlisle, were groomsmen.

Mr and Mrs Liddell gave a reception at Eden Holme where with the bridegroom's mother, Mrs Wancke, they received a large number of guests.

The honeymoon is being spent motoring in Scotland.

130. William Clark was born on 17 Feb 1871 in 14 North Bridge Street, Monkwearmouth, Co. Durham,322 was baptised on 26 Apr 1871 in St Peter's Church, Monkwearmouth, Co. Durham,548 and died on 20 May 1956 in West Hertfordshire Hospital, Hemel Hempstead at age 85.

General Notes: At the time of his father's death (Jan 1901) William was working for Messrs. J.H. Holmes & Co., Electricians, Portland Road, Newcastle.

In 1908 he was living at Bulstrode, Chipperfield, Nr. Kings Langley, Herts which he let in Nov of that year. In Kelly's Directory of 1910 he is shown as living at Havenholme, Kings Langley and he and his wife stayed there until they died. The house (also known as 18 Watford Road, Kings Langley) was demolished in the 1960s or 1970s to make way for development.

At the time of his mother's death in 1935 William was a brush manufacturer probably with one of the many such firms in Watford.

Some things about his life were:

• Education: betw. 1881-1885, Aysgarth Preparatory School, North Yorkshire. 549

• Education: betw. Sep 1885-Apr 1888, Repton School, Derbyshire. 336 William was in J. H. Gurney's House ( Latham House)

• Education: betw. 1889-1892, Cambridge. 549,550 William was admitted as an undergraduate at St. John's College on 14 October 1889 where his tutor was Dr Sandys. Matriculated in Michaelmas term, 1889, and received an honours B.A. in 1892. There is no record of the tripos which he took but he was bracketed 40th junior optime; the family believe it was a Maths tripos.

Note:
1) The title 'tutor' at Cambridge does not denote a teacher, more a guardian, who in William's day would have been reponsible also for his selection for admission.

2)'Junior optimes' were the lower of the two honours degree classifications operating at Cambridge at that time. The other being senior optimes. Those only obtaining a pass degree were titled 'hoi polloi', or colloquially 'poll-men'.

• Will: 17 Nov 1913, Kings Langley, Hertfordshire. Left every thing to his wife Beatrice and appointed her sole executrix.

• Probate Granted: 23 Aug 1956, London, England. 551,552 Effects: £40383 12s 8d. Adminisration was applied for by Ruth Hargarve, his only child, presumably because her mother, who was the nominated executrix, was too infirm to act. A further grant was made on August 11th, 1965 at London to Ivan Gordon Hargrave, his grandson. (This was after Ruth's death on October 2nd, 1964.)

William married Beatrice Mary Cooper, daughter of Thomas Cooper and Eleanor Swift Ainsworth, on 22 Nov 1898 in Christ Church, Southport, Lancs. 332.,333 Beatrice was born in Aug 1871 in Bolton, Lancashire,553,554 was baptised on 21 Aug 1871 in St Georges, Bolton, Lancashire,555 and died on 9 Jan 1957 in Hertfordshire 338,556 at age 85.

Some things about her life were:

• Education: 23 Sep 1885, Cheltenham, Gloucestershire. 554 Admitted to Cheltenham Ladies' College boarding in Roderic House. This was the same house as Jessie Clark later to be her sister-in-law.

• Probate Granted: 15 Mar 1957, London, England. 557 Effects: £36261 1s 2d

The child from this marriage was:

+ 197 F    i. Ruth Clark was born on 29 Nov 1899 in 15 Hambledon View, Sunderland, Co. Durham, was baptised on 8 Nov 1900 in Christ Church, Bishopwearmouth, Co. Durham, and died on 2 Oct 1964 in 1 Mostyn Flats, Westbourne Road, Scarborough at age 64.


131. Frederick Clark was born on 28 Oct 1874 in 1 Thornhill Terrace, Sunderland, Co. Durham,203 was baptised on 25 Nov 1874 in St Michael's Church, Bishopwearmouth,559 and died in Nov 1967 in California, USA 335 at age 93.

Some things about his life were:

• Education: betw. Jan 1889-Jul 1893, Repton School, Derbyshire. 344 Fred was in J. H. Gurney's House ( Latham House)

Frederick married Stella Bruce, daughter of Alfred Proctor Bruce and Mary Belle McClard, on 22 Jul 1911 in California, USA.336 The marriage ended in Separation. Stella was born on 21 Aug 1889.

The child from this marriage was:

   198 M    i. Frederick Leonard Clark was born on 19 Mar 1914 in Lincoln, Placer County, Calfornia and died on 5 Dec 1968 in St. John's Hospital, Santa Monica, California at age 54. The cause of his death was some liver ailment possibly cirrhosis. Another name for Frederick was Fred Clark.

Some things about his life were:

• Obituary: 7 Dec 1968, New York. THE NEW YORK TIMES, SATURDAY, DECEMBER 7, 1968

Fred Clark, 54, Versatile Actor On Television and in Films, Dies

Became Typed as Indignant, Exasperated Character — on Burns and Allen


HOLLYWOOD, Dec. 6 (UPI)

— Fred Clark, the bald, moustached actor who played countless character roles in movies, on the stage and on television for 30 years, died yesterday at St. John's Hospital in nearby Santa Monica. He was 54 years old.

The actor entered the hospital for treatment of back pains three weeks ago. The exact cause of death was not known.

Familiar Face on TV


An accomplished dramatic actor, Mr. Clark, appeared in more than 50 movies, playing stuffy businessmen, martinet military officers, a corrupt newspaper columnist, a Lothario executive and detectives.

But the 6-foot, 2-inch actor became best known in the early nineteen-fifties as the next-door neighbor of George Burns and Gracie Allen, showing uncontrolled indignation at the antics of Miss Allen in the TV series.

Although he appeared in films with such stars as Joan Crawford, Gary Cooper, William Holden, Gloria Swanson, Paulette Goddard and William Powell, he became firmly typed for his exasperated, cynical fathers or businessmen.

His movies included "Sunset Boulevard," "Hollywood Story," "White Heat," "Don't Go Near the Water," "Auntie Mame," "The Mating Game," "Miracle in the Rain" and "The Court-Martial of Billy Mitchell."

Sought Medical Education

On the Broadway stage, Mr. Clark played an American envoy in Peter Ustinov’s comedy "Romanoff and Juliet," in 1957; an aggressive advertising vice-president in "Viva Madison Avenue!", a comedy by George Panetta, produced in 1960, and a bewhiskered nonconformist scientist in Ira Wallach’s comedy, "Absence of a Cello," in 1964. The scientist role was his first starring part on Broadway.

A year earlier he opened in London as the star of the Broadway comedy "Never Too Late"

Mr. Clark was born in Lincoln, a farming town in California. His father was a county agricultural commissioner. He entered Stanford University with a medical career in mind. But an appearance in a college production of "Yellow Jack," the Sydney Howard and Paul de Kruif drama about the research in Cuba for the yellow fever germ, set him off on an acting career.

After winning a scholarship to the American Academy of Dramatic Arts, he found parts in summer stock and little theaters. In 1938, he made his first Broadway appearance in "Schoolhouse on the Lot." Shortly after, he went to Hollywood.

The actor became a Navy pilot when this country entered World War II, but overage a year later in 1943, he joined the Army and spent 23 months with the Third Army in Europe.

After the war, he moved to Los Angeles and joined the Gryphon Players at Laguna Beach, which brought him to the attention of Michael Curtiz, Hollywood director, who signed him for the film "The Unsuspected."

In 1966 Mr. Clark married Gloria M. Glaser, a model,. His first wife was Benay Venuta, the musical comedy actress, whom he met when both were appearing in "Light Up the Sky" in Los Angeles.

Mr. Clark is co-starred with Dean Jones and Diane Baker in "Horse in a Grey Flannel Suit," a film scheduled to be released around Christmas.

• Obituary: 11 Dec 1968, Holywood, California. 560 

VARIETY - Wednesday, December 11, 1968

FRED CLARK

Fred Clark, 54, whose slow-burn technique made him one of the top comedians of the screen, died of a liver ailment at St. John's Hospital, Santa Monica, Calif., Dec. 5th, following admittance three weeks earlier for treatment of a back spasm. He had suffered with back trouble for several years, although not believed to be serious.

Clark's bare dome was a familiar and welcome sight for years both in films and tv, usually playing a comic role although he had started his screen career as a heavy. One of his first pix was Universal's "Ride the Pink Horse," with Robert Montgomery in 1947. In tele, he played the next-door neighbor in the "Burns and Allen Show" for 74 episodes, did 12 Milton Berle shows, and most recently had been doing commercials for a dogfood company.

Active on the screen, with some time-excursions to the London and Broadway stages, Clark's final two film appearances are in pix not yet released, including Walt Disney's "Horse in Gray Flannel Suit" and Otto Preminger's "Skidoo."

Clark was taking a pre-med course at Stanford U in his senior year when he appeared in school theatricals, and decided to turn actor. He won a two-year scholarship to the American Academy of Dramatic Arts, in N.Y. After completing this course he was on the eastern stage for some years before coming to Hollywood.

After becoming established in Hollywood, he exited films temporarily to star on the London stage in "Never Too Late," and on Broadway starred in "Romanoff and Juliet," in 1957, and again in 1963, in "Absence of a Cello."

Among his best known films are "Unsuspected," "A Place in the Sun," "Sunset Blvd," "Daddy Long Legs," "How to Marry a Millionaire," "Don't Go Near Water," "Auntie Mame," "Flamingo Road" and "Solid Gold Cadillac."

Following his Burns & Allen and Berle stints, he most recently was in the "Secret Life of Henry Phyfe" teleseries. His wife in the Burns & Allen program, Bea Benaderet, died earlier this year.

His wife, Gloria, and mother survive.

Frederick married Benay Venuta in 1952.561 The marriage ended in Divorce in Aug 1962. Benay was born on 27 Jan 1911 in San Francisco 562 and died on 1 Sep 1995 in New York 563 at age 84. The cause of her death was lung cancer.563 Another name for Benay was Benvenuta Rose Crooke.

General Notes: Singer, Broadway and Hollywood actress, and sculptor. She was in show business for almost seven decades - from 1925 through to 1993.

Some things about her life were:

• Obituary: 2 Sep 1995, New York. 563 

THE NEW YORK TIMES

September 2nd, 1995

Benay Venuta, 84, and Actress, Singer, Dancer and Sculptor
by Lawrence Van Gelder

Benay Venuta, whose career in show business began as a teen-age dancer in 1925 and ended with a bit part in a Woody Allen's 1993 movie "Manhattan Murder Mystery," died yesterday at her home in Manhattan. She was 84.

The cause was lung cancer, said her daughter Patricia Winter.

A singer, actress, radio personality, painter and sculptor, Ms. Venuta was best known as an active participant in New York theater for more than 50 years. Her Broadway career began when, as a virtually unknown, she replaced Ethel Merman, who became her close friend, in Cole Porter's "Anything Goes" in 1935.

Ms. Venuta went on to leading roles on Broadway in such shows as "By Jupiter," "Nellie Bly," "Hazel Flagg," and "Kiss the Boys Goodbye" and "Copper and Brass." She toured and played summer stock and regional theaters in "A Little Night Music," "Bus Stop," "Gypsy," "Come Blow Your Horn," "Auntie Mame," "Light Up the Sky" and "Pal Joey."

She also performed at Lincoln Center in revivals of "Any Get Your Gun" and "Carousel."

In Hollywood, Ms. Venuta appeared in films including "The Fuzzy Pink Nightgown," "Call Me Mister"and " Annie Get Your Gun."

Ms. Venuta was named Benvenuta Rose Crooke at her birth in San Francisco in 1911.

In a 1935 interview, she said that when she quit high school to go into show business she "just added a 'ay' to Ben and the rest I guess you can figure."

Ms. Venuta said her grandfather sent her to a finishing school in Geneva. She dropped out (but not before learning French and Italian), went off to London and came home in 1929 to discover her family was broke.

"My father was dead, and I had to go to work," she said. "You know the rest — nightclubs, radio, hoofing — then this." She was speaking of her big break in "Anything Goes."

For much of her life, Ms. Venuta painted and made sculptures, and for a time in the 1970's her Plexiglas sculptures were sold at Bonwit Teller in Manhattan for $150 to $1,500.

Ms. Venuta was married and divorced three times.

In addition to Ms. Winter, she is survived by another daughter, Deborah Herschel, both of Manhattan, and five grandchildren.

Frederick next married Gloria M Glaser.

132. Mabel Clark was born on 17 Jun 1877 in 1 Thornhill Terrace, Sunderland, Co. Durham,203 was baptised on 30 Sep 1877 in St Michael's Church, Bishopwearmouth,565 and died on 10 Feb 1964 in Cambridge 338 at age 86.

Some things about her life were:

• Education: Sep 1889 To <1893>, Cheltenham, Gloucestershire. Admitted to Cheltenham Ladies' College boarding in Bunwell House.

• Probate Granted: 12 Jun 1964, Peterborough. 566 Estate: £34083.

Mabel married Arthur Estcourt Harrison,567 son of Revd. William Estcourt Harrison and Margaret Scholefield Battye, on 7 Oct 1897 in Christ Church, Bishopwearmouth, Co. Durham.339 Arthur was born on 21 Jan 1865,568 was baptised on 18 Feb 1865 in St Olave, York,567 and died on 23 Aug 1958 in Douro Nursing Home, Cheltenham at age 93.

Some things about his life were:

• Probate Granted: 14 Oct 1958, Gloucester. 569 Effects: £38282 2s 5d.

Children from this marriage were:

   199 F    i. Margaret Estcourt Harrison was born in 1898 in Ashbrooke Towers, Sunderland 570 and died on 31 Mar 1963 in Nobles Hospital, Douglas, IOM at age 65.

Margie married Henry Cecil Jackson,572 son of Dr Henry Jackson M.R.C.S. and Rose Harriet Bilney, on 22 May 1922 in The Parish Church, Sturdington, Glos. 348.,571 Cecil was born in 1883 in Barnstaple, North Devon 572 and died on 17 Jan 1962 in St George's Nursing Home, Royston, Hertfordshire at age 79.



   200 F    ii. Rachel Estcourt Harrison was born on 30 May 1899 in Ashbrooke Towers, Sunderland 573 and died in Dec 1997 in Bracknell, Berkshire 574 at age 98.

Rachel married Keith Arnold Braden 574 in 1922 in Marylebone, London.575 The marriage ended in Separation. Keith was born in 1892 in Thanet, Kent 574,576 and died in 1966 in Brighton, Sussex 574,577 at age 74.

Rachel had a relationship with Walter Marshall Sibbald.574 578 Walter was born in 1901 574 and died in 1961 574 at age 60.

133. Leonard Clark MC was born on 25 Apr 1883 in 1 Thornhill Terrace, Sunderland, Co. Durham,340 was baptised on 13 Jun 1883 in St Michael's Church, Bishopwearmouth,341 and died on 3 Jan 1974 in Victoria, British Columbia 342,343 at age 90.

General Notes: Sometime fruit farmer in Canada

Some things about his life were:

• Education: Winchester College, Winchester. 344 Leonard was in 'G' House ( Sargent's House) but nothing else is recorded about his time there.

• Military Award: 11 Jul 1919, London, England. 579 Leonard was awarded the Military Cross for "conspicious gallantry and devotion to duty" in an action during World War I.

Leonard married Catherine Anthony M Smith 342 on 29 Dec 1919 in Nelson, British Columbia, Canada 344.,345 Catherine was born <1893> and died on 24 Feb 1977 in Victoria, British Columbia 580 at age 84.

Children from this marriage were:

+ 201 M    i. Leonard Hugh Clark 342 was born on 29 Jun 1921 342 and died on 8 Aug 1986 in Victoria, British Columbia 342 at age 65.

   202 F    ii. Margaret Catherine Barbara Clark was born in Aug 1923.


134. Maude Clark was born on 26 Oct 1885 in 1 Thornhill Terrace, Sunderland, Co. Durham,346 was baptised on 21 Dec 1885 in Christ Church, Bishopwearmouth, Co. Durham,581 and died on 25 Aug 1966 in St John's Wood, London at age 80.

Some things about her life were:

• Probate Granted: London, England. 582 Estate: £9707

Nonie married Geoffrey Davenport Powell, son of Revd. Clement Powell and Anna Carew Davenport, on 29 Apr 1908 in St Peter's, Great Windmill Street, London 348.,349 The marriage ended in Divorce. Geoffrey was born in 1884 in Farnham, Surrey.

The child from this marriage was:

   203 M    i. Ralph Baden Davenport Powell was born in 1911 in London, England 583 and died on 11 Nov 1976 in London, England 584 at age 65.

Some things about his life were:

• Probate Granted: 25 Jan 1977, London, England. 585 Effects: £542

Nonie next married Rowland Berkeley Woodhouse, son of Henry Melvill Woodhouse and Mary Lateward Berkeley, on 20 Jun 1914 in All Saints Church, Norfolk Square, London  W.350 Rowley was born on 15 Apr 1871 in Weybridge, Surrey 586 and died on 30 Jan 1944 in St Johns Wood, London NW8 at age 72.

General Notes: Sometime wine merchant in London.

Some things about his life were:

• Probate Granted: 3 Aug 1944, Llandudno. 587 Effects: £4310 11s 8d. Executors: Maude Woodhouse and Keith Miller solicitor.

135. John Culliford Clark was born on 4 Mar 1876 in Hampstead, Middlesex,354 died on 26 Oct 1918 at age 42, and was buried on 30 Oct 1918 in Pinner, Middlesex.355 Another name for Ford was John Arthur Clark.

Some things about his life were:

• Education: May 1890-Dec 1893, Repton School, Derbyshire. 588 In John Gurney House.

• Probate Granted: 12 Feb 1919, London, England. 589 Effects: £19277 3s 4d.

Ford married Ethel Lee Thompson, daughter of John Thompson and Mary Caster, on 11 Jul 1900 in St Mark's, Peterborough.356 Ethel was born on 18 Jul 1879 in Peterborough 590 and died on 13 Oct 1946 in Christchurch, Hants. 591 at age 67.

Some things about their marriage were:

• Wedding: 11 Jul 1900, Peterborough. 592 The Peterborough and Huntingdonshire Standard reported Ford's and Ethel's wedding at some length:-

A FASHIONABLE WEDDING AT PETERBOROUGH

CLARK-THOMPSON

Much interest was aroused in the city on Wednesday afternoon, by the marriage at St. Mark's Church, of Miss Ethel Lee Thompson second daughter of Mrs Thompson, of the Lindens, Peterborough, and of the late Alderman John Thompson, J.P. to Mr. John Culliford Clark, of Oakleigh Park, London. The residence of the bride's mother being in close proximity to the church, an entrance thither was affected by way of the Vicarage garden. As the guests assembled the organist (Mr. W. J. Roberts) rendered the following selections:- Grand Choeur Solame, Allegretto (Lemmen), Festal March (Elvey), Grand Offertoire (Hainsworth) and Minuet (Haydn.) It was a glorious summer day, and the sun shone brilliantly from a cloudless sky when at 2.20 the bride entered the church, and was met at the door by the surpliced choir. The service was fully choral, the hymns "The voice that breath'd o'er Eden," and "O Perfect love" being sung. The Rev. S. Phillips, D.D., Precentor of Peterborough Cathedral, intoned the prayers, the Rev. B. de M. Egerton (vicar of St. Mark's), and the Rev. J. H. Molesworth, vicar of St. John's, Leicester, and formerly of St. Mark's, Peterborough assisting in the service. Mrs Thompson gave her daughter away, and Mr Stanley Clark, brother of the bridegroom, acted as best man. The bride wore an exquisitely pretty dress of white satin with Brussels lace and Brussels lace veil, and she was attended by Master George Clark, as train bearer. There were five bridesmaids, viz. Miss Thompson (sister), Miss [Lita] Clark and Miss Jennie Clark (sisters of the bridegroom), Miss Vera Thompson and Miss Iris Thompson (nieces of the bride). The three elder wore dresses of pale green crepe de chin, with a deep corslet of pink silk, and white chiffon hats trimmed with pink roses. The two younger wore dresses of white silk with insertions, with white picture hats. They carried baskets of flowers, and each wore a gold brooch, the gift of the bridegroom. During the signing of the register, Mr Roberts played Smart's "Festal March" and as the bridal party left the edifice the strains of Mendelssohn's "Wedding March" pealed forth. A reception was afterwards held at the Lindens, and at five o'clock the bride and bridegroom departed for Scotland. The bride's travelling dress was of Wedgwood blue silk voyle with black picture hat. During the afternoon and evening merry peals were rung upon the bells of St. John's Church (sic).

[The report of the wedding continued with a list of those invited of which the immediate family members and some church dignitaries are noted below. The list does not seem to contain any Thompsons from the bride's side.]

Mr and Mrs J. T. (sic) Clark, the Misses Clark, Mr Stanley Clark, the Masters Clark, Mr Peter Clark, Mr, Mrs, and Miss Clark (Ashbrook Towers, Sunderland), Mr H. and Mrs Clark (Sunderland), Mr and Mrs J. H. W. Culliford (Thornhill, Sunderland), the Bishop of Peterborough and Lady Mary Colyn, the Dean and Miss Ingram, Canon and Mrs Clayton, Canon, Mrs, and Miss Alderson,……… Mr and Mrs E. P. Hull (Redhill),……… Mr G. G. and Mrs Thompson (West Hall, near Sunderland), Mr R. C. and Mrs Thompson (Penshaw House, near Durham), Mr V. T. and Mrs Thompson, Mr J. [E.] and Mrs Thompson (Thornhill Park, Sunderland),……… Mr and Mrs Vaux (Streatham).

[The report then listed the wedding presents received and the donors. Those shown below are mostly from the family]

Bride to bridegroom — Dressing case
Bridegroom to bride — Diamond and sapphire necklace
Present [unspecified] — Mother [Mrs Thompson]
Shawl — Miss Thompson
Tennis set — C. E. Thompson
Silver tea and coffee service — Mr and Mrs T. J. Thompson
Silver rose bowl — Nurse at Southery Lodge
Small clock — Iris, Joan and Julius
Teapot — Servants at Southery
Nutcrackers and peelers — Mr and Mrs W. Thompson
Pair of red slippers — Mrs G. Thompson
Dining-room cock and barometer — Members of office staff, 43 Wood-street
Letter rack — Mr A. Thompson
Pair of hot water cans — Servants at Oakleigh Park
Drawing-room clock — Mr and Mrs Hull
Worcestershire ornament — Mrs James Thompson
Four pepperettes — Mr and Mrs Willie Clark
Silver waiter — Mr V. Thompson
Four sweet dishes and jam pot — Nurse at Oakleigh Park
Silver photo frame and toast rack — Jane at Oakleigh Park
Silver salver — Mr and Mrs Culliford
Silver pepper pots — Mr and Mrs R. E. Thompson
Cheque — Mr Harry Clark
Tea and coffee set — Mr George Clark
Musical gong — Ivan, Archie, Malcolm and George
Silver cafe au lait — Stanley Clark
Afternoon tea and coffee set — Lita and Jennie
Furniture, dinner service, glass and cheque — Father of the bridegroom
Silver ink stand — Staff of Messrs Culliford and Clark


Some things about her life were:

• Probate Granted: 13 Oct 1946, London, England. 593 Effects: £1861-8s-7d

Children from this marriage were:

   204 F    i. Phyllis Mary Clark was born on 12 Mar 1902 594 and died on 23 Feb 2000 595 at age 97.

Some things about her life were:

• Cremation: Guildford Crematorium.

+ 205 F    ii. Ethel Betty Clark was born on 28 Aug 1904 596 and died on 25 Oct 1999 in April Cottage, Shackstead Lane, Godalming, Surrey. 518,597 at age 95.

+ 206 F    iii. Joyce Clark was born on 20 Jan 1906 599 and died on 19 Mar 2002 600 at age 96.

+ 207 M    iv. John Stuart Clark was born on 4 Jul 1907 588,603 and died on 4 Jul 1991 in Porthgwara Nursing Home, Coverack, Cornwall 604,605 at age 84.


137. Stanley Clark was born on 20 Nov 1878 in Hampstead, Middlesex 360 and died on 5 Jan 1954 in Hampshire 361 at age 75.

Some things about his life were:

• Education: Apr 1893-Dec 1896, Repton School, Derbyshire. 609 Like his brother, John, Stanley went to Repton but he seems to have been in a different house, Chatham, and he and John only overlapped for a couple of terms. The School Register has nothing to report in respect of his prefectorial or school team activities and in the latter respect he and his brother John must have been something of a disappointment to their father as he was a keen athlete. Perhaps, John and Stanley took after the Thompson side, certainly, their father's sons by his second wife had a little more athletic success at Malvern.
 

• Occupation: c .1896-c.1936, Various Places. 374,610 Stanley, in all probability, joined the firm of Culliford and Clark shortly after leaving school. His time there would have been interrupted by WWI in which he served from about 1916 to 1919. He seems to have returned there after the war and, despite not being popular with his father, continued there until after his father died in 1935.

The firm of Culliford and Clark Limited (it turned itself into a limited company in 1923) continued for 15 years after Stanley's father died and finally seems to have been wound-up in 1950. By 1936, Stanley, who was by then the only Clark working in the firm, was about 58 years old and having come into some money, he decided to retire to Bishopstoke, south of Winchester, (his wife came from the Winchester area). Here he bought or rented the old Manor House which had been the residence over the years of several Deans of Winchester. It occupied an island bounded by the river Itchen and boasted an ancient and sizeable fish pond. During WWII, he is reputed to have netted and sold eels to help with food shortages..

Stanley and his wife lived at Manor House until he died in 1954. The building still remains (in 2000) but was later converted to flats.

Shot married Winifred Mary Arnold, daughter of Francis Smith Arnold and Elizabeth Mary Harris, on 3 Jul 1906 in St Swithin's Church, Martyr Worthy, Hants. 362.,363 Winifred was born on 4 Feb 1879 in Southampton and died on 6 May 1971 in Hampshire at age 92.

Some things about her life were:

• Probate Granted: 6 Aug 1971, Winchester. 611 Estate: £2304

Children from this marriage were:

+ 208 F    i. Janet Clark 612 was born in 1907 612 and died in 1981 613,614 at age 74.

+ 209 F    ii. Nancy Clark was born in 1909 616 and died on 23 Aug 1999 in Hampshire 613 at age 90.


   210 M    iii. Richard Arnold Clark was born on 16 Sep 1912 in Lincombe, Addlestone, Surrey 619 and died on 1 Dec 1988 in Hampshire 620 at age 76.


   211 M    iv. Anthony Clark was born on 27 May 1914 621 and died on 20 Aug 1971 in Hampshire at age 57.

General Notes: At Dover College. Later became a Chartered Surveyor and worked for Messrs Pink & Arnold in Winchester. Pink & Arnold was his maternal grandfather's firm. 622

Anthony married Nancy Winifred Arnold, daughter of Alan Arnold and Dorothy Marian S Roots, on 16 Mar 1950 in Winchester 623.,624 Nancy was born <1914> and died on 25 Dec 2007 in Winchester at age 93.

Marriage Notes: Antony and Nancy were 1st cousins

138. Jane Clark was born on 9 Apr 1882 in Hampstead, Middlesex and died on 30 Jul 1975 in Hampshire 364 at age 93.

Some things about her life were:

• Confirmation: 30 May 1899, All Saints Church, Friern Barnet, Middlesex. 358 Tok her first communion on Sunday, June 4th

Jennie married George Herbert Westerberg,625 son of Johan August Westerberg and Jemima Marshall Anderson, on 23 Jun 1910 in Watford Parish Church, Hertfordshire 365.,366 George was born <1879> in Sweden,625 died on 5 Sep 1916 in Somme, France 625 at age 37, and was buried in Dantzig Alley British Cemetery, Mametz, Somme, France.626

Some things about their marriage were:

• Wedding: 23 Jun 1910, Watford, Hertfordshire. 627 

THE WEST HERTS AND WATFORD OBSERVER SATURDAY, JUNE 25, 1910

MARRIAGE OF MISS J. CLARK.

There was a crowded congregation in the Parish Church, Watford, on Thursday afternoon, when the wedding was solemnised of Miss Jane Clark (second daughter of Mr. John L. Clark, "The Elms," Watford), with Mr. George Herbert Westerberg (fourth son of the late Mr. A. Westerberg and Mrs. Westerberg, of Gothenberg, Sweden). The sacred building had been beautifully decorated; at the entrance to the chancel were lovely palms, lilies and ferns, and in front of the altar also stood palms, lilies and roses. Prior to the ceremony Mr. G. A. Porter, who presided at the organ, played "Elsa's Bridal March" (Wagner), Pastorale (Lemare), Nuptial March (Roeckel), Serenade (Schubert), Madrigal (Lemare), and Bridal music from "Lohengrin." The officiating clergymen were the Rev. H. S. Miles (Vicar of All Saints' Friern Barnet), and the Rev. R. Lee James (Vicar of Watford). The service was fully choral. The hymn, "The voice that breathed o'er Eden," was sung as a processional; Psalm lvii was rendered to a chant by Barnby, and the other hymn sung was "O, perfect Love." The bride wore a very effective gown of rich cream satin, the corsage being of exceedingly handsome pearl and crystal embroidery, veiled with Brussels appliqué lace; the skirt had a tunic of Brussels net edged with appliqué, the underskirt being caught in with a large true lover's knot of satin; the train hung from the shoulder and was clasped by two crystal ornaments. The veil, which was lent by Mrs. Ford Clark, was of Brussels lace, and was worn over a tiara of orange blossom. The bride also wore some real orange blossom, the gift of the Rev. R. Lee James. Mr. Clark gave his daughter away, and the best man was Mr. Irwin Geddes (cousin of the bridegroom). The bride was followed by her sister, Miss Lila Clark and Miss Nellie Coombe, who were attired in pale blue ninon over satin of the same shade; they had large blue hats to match, with a wreath of small pink roses round the crown. They carried bouqests of pink roses, and their moonstone brooches were the gifts of the bridegroom. There were also four little bridesmaids - Miss Ruth Clark (cousin of the bride), and Phyllis, Betty, and Janet Clark (nieces of the bride). They wore white embroidered muslin frocks, with touches of blue, white crinoline hats trimmed with pink rosebuds, moonstone pendants, and carried bunches of pink roses. The pendants and roses were the gifts of the bridegroom. The bride's mother wore a beautiful gown of champagne moire, handsomely trimmed, and a large black picture hat, and carried a bouquet of crimson carnations. The bridegroom's mother was attired in a black silk gown, trimmed with Brussels lace, and carried a bouquet of yellow roses. As the wedding party left the church the organist played Mendlessohn's "Wedding March." A reception was afterwards held at the Elms, the guests numbering about 200. Later on Mr. and Mrs. Westerberg left for Holland and Sweden. The bride went away in a becoming gown of blue silk crêpe and a large crinoline hat of blue with black feathers.

Some things about his life were:

• Probate Granted: 27 Dec 1916, London, England. 628 Effects: £5498 17s 7d

Children from this marriage were:

   212 M    i. Peter Westerberg 629 was born in 1911 in Watford, Hertfordshire.630

   213 F    ii. Marjorie Jane Westerberg 631 was born on 7 Jun 1914 in Watford, Hertfordshire 632 and died in Feb 1999 in Chichester, Hants. 633 at age 84.

Marjorie married Denis James Attenborough, son of Cyril Percy Attenborough and Dorothy Marguerite Kelly, in 1937 in Watford, Hertfordshire.634 Denis was born on 23 Aug 1911 in Watford, Hertfordshire and died in Jan 1999 in Cirencester, Gloucestershire 635 at age 87.

139. Ivan Julius Clark was born on 28 Jun 1889 in Southampton Lodge, Oakleigh Park, Middlesex,60,371 was baptised on 6 Jun 1891 in All Saints Church, Friern Barnet, Middlesex,60 died on 13 Jun 1931 in 26 Capel Road, Colchester 372,373 at age 41, and was buried on 16 Jun 1931. The cause of his death was coal-gas poisoning.636

General Notes: Ivan left Malvern College in the end of the summer term in 1907 and there is then a considerable period of time during which we have no knowledge of what he was doing. It seems likely that he went out to America, like several of his Clark cousins, probably sometime before the beginning of WW I because, unlike his brothers, he does not appear to have fought in that War.

What he was doing during those years has not been discovered but it may be that like his brother George (1896-1964) he was encouraged by his father to go out there to farm in some way, possibly to grow fruit. What can be said, however, is that he married Elsa whilst he was there and very likely their first child was born there and eventually he brought them back to England in time for his second son George to be born in April 1921 at Stanway just outside Colchester.

By then Ivan had set up as a poultry farmer. The poultry farming business must have got into difficulties, possibly because of Ivan's ill-health or incompetence because the family seem to have left Hart Farm at Stanway and moved into Colchester by the time Gerald was born in 1927 and Ivan is reported to have had money difficulties towards the end of his life.

Some things about his life were:

• Education: May 1903-Jul 1907, Malvern College, Malvern, Worcs. 385 Unlike his two older stepbrothers, Ivan was sent to Malvern College instead of Repton. What prompted his father to choose a different school for the boys in his second family is not known; perhaps he was displeased with the way Repton "turned out" John and Stanley or perhaps the Julius family had some connection with Malvern.

Be that as it may, Ivan went there in 1903, joining the School in the Upper 4th — one of the lower school forms — and had moved up to the Science Form by the time he left. He was in Col. Bullock's House [now No. 9]. He was a School Prefect and was in the School Shooting VIII.

Ivan's entry in the School Register makes no reference to any service in WWI, in contrast to those of his brother's, so perhaps he did not get involved in the war. It may be that he had gone to work in the United States (where he, presumably, met and married Elsa) by the time hostilities commenced.

• Inquest: 14 Jun 1931, Colchester, Essex. 636 A local newspaper reported Ivan's death and the subsequent inquest as follows:-

Colchester Resident's Death.

Child's discovery in gas-filled room.

Mr. Ivan J. Clark (42), of 26, Capel Road, Colchester, a resident as well known in Stanway as in the borough, was on Saturday morning found dead at his home in a gas-filled room.

The discovery was made by one of his young childern, and it is stated that deceased had overnight visited his wife at the Essex County Hospital, where she had undergone an operation that day. The police were informed, and the facts reported to the Coroner.

the inquest

on Monday at the County Hospital was conducted without a jury by the Deputy-Coroner (Mr. F. J. Smith), who heard medical evidence showing the cause of death to be coal-gas poisoning.

Mr. G. E. Tompson, solicitor, represented the family of deceased.

Malcolm Clark, a solicitor, of King's Bench Walk, Temple, London, brother of deceased, said he last saw his brother alive in London about a month ago. Deceased's health was very bad indeed: he often complained of pains in his eyes and of lumbago, and of late his state of health had been getting worse. The fact that his wife was in hospital undergoing a further operation had depressed him very much.

Replying to the Deputy-Coroner as to the deceased's financial position, the witness said he had sent his brother remittances of about £350, and in addition he had paid the rent and rates. Further, if deceased wanted any money for extraordinary things, such as doctor's fees, etc., witness always remitted it.

The Deputy-Coroner: Although there were underpaid bills in the house he need not have worried about them? - No: he would only have to tell me. He added that there was no insanity in the family.

George Julius Clark, aged 10, son of deceased, said on Friday night, when his father bade him and his two younger brothers good-night, he said to him (witness), "Be a good boy to your mother." Next morning witness and his brothers went downstairs to take the papers up to their daddy's room and noticed the smell of gas. Witness went upstairs into the bedroom and saw his father lying dead in bed. The gas in the room was on, and witness turned off the tap and called for assistance from neighbours.

Mrs. Mabel Gorman, who has been employed as a daily help at deceased's house, said during the last few weeks she noticed her employer seemed awfully worried. She left the house on Friday night at about 9.15 or 9.30 and the windows of deceased's bedroom were then open.
Chimney and the keyhole blocked

P.-c. (35) Clark, of Audley Road, said he was called to deceased's house at 9.30 a.m. on Saturday, and was admitted by Mrs. Gor[h]man. He noticed a strong smell of gas, and found deceased lying in a single bed with his forearm over his face, as if asleep. Rigor mortis had set in. The keyhole of the door was blocked up with paper, as also was the chimney of the register stove situated behind the gas-fire. The windows were open when witness arrived. From an examination of the gas-fire tap he did not think it possible for it to be turned on accidentally.

Dr. Reddington said deceased was one of the most imaginative men he had ever met, and his was a typical case of neurasthenia. Recently deceased went to London to see a nerve specialist. Mrs. Clark's operation - the second - at the hospital had a great effect upon her husband: in fact, he worried more over the second operation than the one previous. Witness was called to the house at 9.15 a.m. on Saturday, and was the first person in the bedroom after the boy's discovery. The windows were tightly shut, and deceased had been dead four or five hours.

In returning a verdict that deceased took his own life whilst of unsound mind, the Deputy-Coroner said Mrs. Clark's continued illness undoubtedly had an adverse effect on the state of deceased's mind. He expressed very real sympathy with the widow, and he trusted that the little son would follow out the wishes of his father and make up to her what she had lost by the death of her husband.

The funeral of Mr. Clark took place on Tuesday, the ante-grave service at St. Mary-at-the-Walls Church was conducted by Rev. R. H. Chattey.

Ivan married Elsa Gunther <1919>.374 Elsa was born <1892>.

Marriage Notes: Ivan & Elsa are said to have been married in America but no record of their return by ship to the UK has been found to give a clue to when that took place or to pinpoint their return to England.

It is possible that a Ivan's father's prejudices against Elsa were also held by Ivan's siblings because there seems to have been little contact between them and Elsa after Ivan's death. Ivan's father is reported to have provided for his four grandson's education but no one in the family seems to have kept in contact with them, socially, as they grew up though doubtless Malcolm Clark (1892-1952), who until his retirement dealt with the family's legal matters, had occasion to be in touch with Elsa & the boys. However, his only child Jean (1916-1981) who might have known something of them, died several years before this compiler was actively researching the Clark family. Michael Clark (1920-1999) thought that the boys had been educated at the training establishment HMS Arethusa¹ and later went into the Merchant Navy; Joyce Buckland (née Clark, 1906-2002) thought that only the eldest son John went into the Merchant Navy and that one of the others had become a doctor. Given that HMS Arethusa’s work (see below) was directed at boys & girls in severely deprived circumstances, it is difficult to see how any of Ivan's children could have qualified for the charitable education that was given there and it may be that Michael Clark was mistaken on this score.

As a result of the lack of contact mentioned above, it has not been possible, as yet (2008), to trace what happened to Elsa after Ivan's death or what became of the four boys.

¹ There were two Arethusa training ships that belonged to the 'Shaftesbury Homes and Arethusa Training Ship Company', which was a charitable institution for destitute & homeless boys and girls. The first was HMS Arethusa, an ex-Constance class naval frigate, which was moored at Greenhithe and which was decommissioned in 1934; the second was the re-named four-masted barque Peking, which was based on the Medway at Upnor and which was in operation from 1933 to 1973 with a spell during WW2 as an accommodation ship. The ship was sold in 1974 to the South Street Seaport Museum in New York where she can be seen under her original name Peking. 374,637

General Notes: Elsa was an American who, according to Michael Clark (1920-1999), married Ivan believing he was rich. Apparently Ivan had exactly the same view about her! She was considered an unsuitable wife for Ivan by his parents, particularly his father, on account of a rather working class background.

It is difficult to be certain who Elsa's parents were; there is a record of Elsa travelling back from New York to England on the ship RMS Mauretania in June 1922 when her age is given as 30, this places her year of birth somewhere around 1892. According to the USA census of 1900 there is only one Elsa Gunther whose year of birth is near that date and that is Elsa the child of William & Ida Gunther of Newport City, Kentucky. Unfortunately, there is no record of William & Ida and their family in the USA censuses of 1910 or 1920 to confirm Elsa's year of birth or this connection. 374,638

Children from this marriage were:

   214 M    i. John Clark 637 was born about 1920.637

   215 M    ii. George Julius Clark was born on 12 Apr 1921 in Hart Farm, Stanway, Nr Colchester, Essex.639,640

   216 M    iii. David Clark was born in 1925 in Hart Farm, Stanway, Nr Colchester, Essex.641

   217 M    iv. Gerald S Clark was born in 1927 in Colchester, Essex.642

140. Archibald Cowper Clark was born on 9 May 1891 in Southampton Lodge, Oakleigh Park, Middlesex,60,375 was baptised on 6 Jun 1891 in All Saints Church, Friern Barnet, Middlesex,60 and died on 28 Jul 1966 in St George's Nursing Home of Ferndown, Ringwood Road, Ferndown, Wimbourne, Dorset at age 75.

Some things about his life were:

• Education: May 1905-Jul 1909, Malvern College, Malvern, Worcs. 385 Archibald joined for School in form "Middle IVa" and left from the Matriculation Class. Like his brothers, he was in Col. Bullock's House [now No. 9]. He was a House Prefect and was in the 3rd School Football XI.

• Military Service: Bet 1914 and 1918, Various Places. 385 Archibald served in the R.A.S.C during WWI and finished the war as a Captain.

• Grant of Administration: 15 Nov 1966, London, England. 643 Estate: £ 19091.

Archibald married Dorothy Frances West, daughter of Walter Wooll West and Sarah Grace Hawk, in 1916 in Wisbech, Cambridgeshire.376 Dorothy was born in 1894 in Wisbech, Cambridgeshire 644 and died on 20 Feb 1928 in 85 Gloucester Place, Middlesex at age 34.

Some things about her life were:

• Grant of Administration: 2 Jan 1929, London, England. 645 Effects: £1958 19s 11d.

Children from this marriage were:

+ 218 M    i. Capt. Michael Montagu Cowper Clark MC was born in 1920 in Norfolk 646 and died in 1999 at age 79.

   219 M    ii. Archibald Peter Clark was born in 1925 in Great Chart, Kent 344 and died on 26 Jul 1950 648 at age 25. The cause of his death was aircraft crash.

General Notes: Was killed in an aircraft accident in July 1950 while serving with the RAF.

Medical Notes: Peter, who was in the RAF, died when the aircraft in which he was flying crashed into the sea.

Some things about his life were:

• Education: Sep 1939-Jul 1944, Sherborne School, Dorset. 344 Peter was Head of House, a School Praeposter and in VIth Form by the time he left and was for several years in the 1st Hockey Xl.

• Grant of Administration: 29 Dec 1950, London, England. 649 Effects: £2574 15s 6d

Archibald next married Margery Nora Penelope Webb, daughter of Somerset Edward Deane Webb and Evelyn Mary Bingham Schrieber, in 1931 in Paddington, Middlesex.377 Margery was born <1905> and died on 8 Aug 1966 in Ringwood, Hampshire 650 at age 61.

Some things about her life were:

• Will signed: 20 Apr 1931. 651 Interestingly enough, Margery made her Will "on the contemplation of marriage to Archibald Cowper Clark". It was void if the marriage was not solemnised within three months.

In this Will she made over the monies from her mother's trusts to Archibald and also left him her estate. In the event they did get married within the three months but, some 35 years later, Archibald predeceased her by only 11 days and, judging by her executors, she left her estate and her interest in her mother's trusts to another member of her family.

NOTE:
Her mother, whose maiden name was Schreiber, appears to have come from a particularly well-to-do family judging by the domestic establishment her father kept as revealed in the 1881 Census.

• Grant of Administration: London. 652 Effects: £2295

141. Malcolm Clark was born on 17 Dec 1892 in Southampton Lodge, Oakleigh Park, Middlesex,378,379 was baptised on 23 Jan 1893 in All Saints Church, Friern Barnet, Middlesex,379 died on 1 Nov 1952 in The Norfolk and Norwich Hospital, Norwich 200,380 at age 59, and was buried on 6 Nov 1952 in Cawston Cemetery, Norfolk.381

Some things about his life were:

• Education: Jan 1907-Dec 1910, Malvern College, Malvern, Worcs. 385 Malcolm went to the prep school Matfield Grange in Kent prior to going to Malvern College. Rather surprisingly, he was 15 years old when he started at Malvern — his brothers all went there aged 14, whether this was because he had failed an earlier entrance exam, which seems unlikely, or because he had lost a year because of illness or some other reason, is not known. However, he started off in a middle school form, Lower Shell, and progressed to the Matriculation Class in the upper school by the time he left.

Like his brothers he was in Col. Bullock's House [now No. 9] and was a House Prefect and in the House Football XI.

• Military Service: Nov 1914-Feb 1919, Various Places. 653 Having been in the Officer Training Corps at school and with the Inns of Court while he was an articled clerk, Malcolm was quick to apply for and obtain a Territorial Commission in the early days of WWI and was posted to the Army Service Corps (ASC) either by choice (a strange one, perhaps, for someone of Malcolm's background) or because he was not deemed fit enough for a front-line regiment. Initially, he served with the Essex Brigade (Reserve) Company, East Anglian Divisional Train¹.

In January 1916 Malcolm was posted to the Mediterranean Expeditionary Force and eventually found himself in Stavros in Macedonia doing transport duties with the 27th Divisional Train. Here he became ill with colitis dysentery and was invalided back to the UK.

Back in the UK in October 1916, having been appointed a temporary Lieutenant, he became adjutant of the 64th (2nd Highland) Divisional Train and later was promoted to acting Captain in September 1917. The 64th remained in England throughout the war and Malcolm remained with them because after his dysentery he was deemed only fit for Home Duties. He left that appointment in Feb 1919 when he was discharged from the Army.

¹ The ASC had horsed transport companies that provided each division of the army with a certain level of transport under its own command for carrying stores, supplies and suchlike; this transport was known as the Divisional Train.

• Occupation: 1911 to 1940, London, England. 385,653 After leaving Malvern, Malcolm joined some firm of solicitors in London — possibly the one in which he later became a partner — as an articled clerk. WWI interrupted his articles and in November 1914 he applied for commission and served out the war in the Army Service Corps (See Military Service above).

On his discharge from the Army in February 1919 he completed the final year of his articles before joining the firm of Merriman, White & Co., of King's Bench Walk Temple, where he became a partner; he remained there until 1940.

• Obituary: 4 Nov 1952, Norwich. 654

Mr. M. CLARK

Solicitor Who Became Norfolk Farmer

Mr. Malcolm Clark, of The Farm House, Booton, died in a Norwich nursing home on Saturday at the age of 59. Mr Clark, who was a solicitor, had many close associations with Norfolk and spent much of his boyhood at Hunstanton. He studied law and after serving for four years in the 1914-18 war he became a partner in the firm of Merriman, White & Co., of King's Bench Walk Temple. He practised as a solicitor for 20 years and was an active member of the Law Society. As a grandson of the founder of George Clark Ltd, marine engineers, of Sunderland, he assisted in the amalgamation of the company of Richardson, Westgarth & Co. Ltd., and became a member of the board of directors and eventually vice-chairman. In the last war he commanded the 22nd Battalion of the Middlesex Regiment of the Home Guard. After the war he returned to Norfolk and went into farming partnership with his brother-in-law, Major H. Rodwell¹. All his life he was a keen golf player. He leaves a widow and one daughter.

¹Hubert Rodwell was married to Malcolm's wife's sister, Dorothy.

• Probate Granted: 16 Feb 1953, London, England. 655 Effects: £18456 3s 3d.

Mac married Elizabeth Christabel Pattrick, daughter of Thomas Pattrick and Marion Gill, in 1914 in Norwich.382 Elizabeth was born on 18 Dec 1892 in Bury St Edmunds, Norfolk,656,657 died on 15 Jun 1983 in Barney, Fakenham, Norfolk 392 at age 90, and was buried in Cawston Cemetery, Norfolk.658

Marriage Notes: It is slightly surprising that Malcolm & Betty only had one child and it can only be supposed that, after the birth of Jean, Betty was unable to have further children.

As a result Jean was brought up as an only child and grew into an extremely attractive, if rather wayward woman, who doubtless caused her parents considerable concern at times. When Jean married Charles van den Broek d'Obrenan in 1946 and set off for Tahiti on his boat, she left behind her two children for her parents to look after.

It is probable that Malcolm and Betty's eldest grandchild, Elizabeth Wilkinson, was by then in some kind of institutional care and but their other granddaughter Tinty came to live with them at Booton and grew up there coming to regard them as her surrogate father and mother.

Some things about her life were:

• Probate Granted: 16 Nov 1983, London, England. 392 Effects: £18150

The child from this marriage was:

+ 220 F    i. Elizabeth Jean Clark was born on 2 Sep 1916 in 8 Cliff Parade, Hunstanton, Norfolk 659 and died on 9 Dec 1981 in London, England 435,658,660 at age 65.


150. Evelyn Mary Clark was born on 3 Sep 1891 in Claremont Terrace, Sunderland, Co. Durham, was baptised on 31 May 1892 in Christ Church, Bishopwearmouth, Co. Durham, and died on 19 Jan 1981 in Blackdown Nursing Home, Mary Tavy, Tavistock, Devon at age 89.

Some things about her life were:

• Probate Granted: 30 Apr 1981, Brighton, Sussex. 665 Estate: £49958.

Molly married Lt. Col. Fendall Frederic Ivor Kinsman, son of Lt. Col. Harold John Kinsman and Emily Ann Fitzgerald, on 27 Jan 1916 in St. James', Piccadilly, London.418 Fendall was born on 8 Nov 1880 in Lucknow, India 427 and died on 6 Jul 1953 in Fir Trees, Ascot, Sunningdale, Berkshire at age 72.

Some things about his life were:

• Education: Aug 1899-Aug 1901, Royal Military College, Sandhurst. 427

• Service Commission: Aug 1901, Various Places. 427 Commissioned on leaving Royal Military College as 2nd Lieut. in XX Battalion of The Connaught Rangers. Gazetted XX August 1901.

Children from this marriage were:

   221 F    i. Anne Rosemary Kinsman was born on 4 Sep 1919 in Co. Durham 666 and died on 16 Aug 2000 in Surrey 667 at age 80.

Anne married John Bickford-Smith in 1953 in Marylebone, London.668 The marriage ended in Divorce.

Anne next married Kenneth Thompson. The marriage ended in Divorce between 1949 and 1951.

Anne next married Charles Peregrine D G Hamilton-Gordon. Charles was born on 5 Jun 1947 and died in Aug 1992 in Yeovil, Somerset at age 45.

   222 M    ii. Anthony Henry Ivor Kinsman


Anthony married Daphne Maureen Graham. Bunty was born on 15 Nov 1928 and died circa 24 Sep 1980 in Manor Farm House, Ryme Intrinseca, Sherborne 392,670,671 at age 51. The cause of her death was accidental injuries.

Medical Notes: Died as the result of injuries sustained from falling down stairs at Manor Farm, Ryme Intrinsica, Dorset.



151. Henry John Clark was born on 4 Aug 1892, was baptised on 1 Nov 1892 in Christ Church, Bishopwearmouth, Co. Durham, and died on 22 Dec 1964 in London, England at age 72.

General Notes: After WW I, in which he served with the Durham Light Infantry, John took up farming and acquired (perhaps with the help of his father) a farm near Chipping Norton where he was a successful breeder of Angus cattle with which he won many prizes. He remained there until about 1935 when, for reasons unknown, he sold up his farm and went off on a round-the-world trip during which he met and married Lois. After their return to England in 1936 they seem to have settled in Sunninghill in Berkshire and he appears never to have worked again. 20 years later he and Lois moved to a flat in London W8 where they stayed for the rest of their lives.

Some things about his life were:

• Education: Apr 1906-Mar 1910, Harrow School, Harrow, Middlesex. 672 Was in Headmaster's House

• Education: Cambridge. John was an undergraduate at Clare College but seems to have gone down without taking a degree.

• Probate Granted: 24 Aug 1965, London, England. 673 Estate: £92999.

John married Lois Margaret Brown, daughter of Jackson R Brown and Frances E ———, in 1936 in Kansas City 419.,420 Lois was born in 1903 in Eureka, Kansas 674 and died on 24 Jan 1968 in London, England 675 at age 65.

Marriage Notes: Lois and John apparently met whilst visiting a temple in Japan. Lois was on a world trip east to west as the companion of a rich, elderly American lady and John was going in the opposite direction.

They were married in America and it appears that John accompanied or followed Lois home there immediately after the end of their respective trips. Strangely enough, they did not return to England together; John came back in late October 1936 via Canada and Lois arrived in England in December of that year having sailed from New York.676,677

General Notes: Presented at Court in 1938 in the company of Anne Kinsman.

Some things about her life were:

• Occupation: London, England. 678,679 Lois was on the editorial staff of "American Outpost", a paper published during WW2 by Americans in England.

• Will: 23 Nov 1953, Berkshire. 680 Lois's Will set up a trust fund from which her husband Henry was to receive the income until his death at which time the capital & income passed to her daughter Virginia who could inherit it absolutely on attaining the age of 25 years.

In the event of Virginia dying without issue, the Trust fund was to pass to Henry's sister's children in equal shares, namely, Anne Rosemary Beckford Smith & Anthony Ivor Kinsman.

• Probate Granted: 26 Feb 1968, London, England. 681 Estate: £142375.

The child from this marriage was:

+ 223 F    i. Virginia Evelyn Frances Clark was born on 19 Nov 1937 in Sunninghill, Berkshire 682,683 and died on 26 Jan 1997 in London, England 684 at age 59. 


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161. Robert Clark was born in 1900 and died in 1962 at age 62.

Robert married Mollie Clifford Clare Whiteside in 1934 in South Africa.

The child from this marriage was:

   224 F    i. Athena Joan Valerie Clark was born on 8 Jun 1937 and died on 22 Feb 2006 at age 68.

171. Robert Sharp Clark 476 was born on 26 Feb 1888 in Whitley, Northumberland and died on 21 Mar 1969 476 at age 81.

Robert married Caroline Howard.476 Caroline was born in 1891 476 and died in 1987 476 at age 96.

Children from this marriage were:

   225 F    i. Ione Clark .476

General Notes: Died in infancy 476

+ 226 M    ii. Robert John Clark 476 was born in 1912 476 and died in 1992 476 at age 80.

+ 227 F    iii. Eileen Clark

+ 228 F    iv. Mary Clark

   229 U    v. Jacky Clark

191. George Geoffrey Clark L.R.I.B.A. was born on 10 Jan 1893,501 died on 26 Oct 1957 in Devon 502 at age 64, and was buried in Clyst St. George, Exeter, Devon.

Some things about his life were:

• Education: Jan 1907-Dec 1909, Rugby School, Rugby, Warwickshire. 501 Donkin House

• Military Service: 1914 to 1918, Various Places. 687 Geoffrey joined the Durham RGA during WW I. He saw service in France and was wounded there.

• Will: 9 Nov 1949, Wareham, Dorset. It may not be entirely coincidental that Geoffrey made this Will at the time he was finalising his mother's Will, of which he was an executor. It appointed his wife Mollie his sole executrix and left his entire estate to her.

• Probate Granted: 14 Jan 1958, Winchester. 688 Effects: £4908 14s 3d

Geoffrey married Ruth Evans, daughter of Joseph Hampson Evans and Edith May. The marriage ended in Divorce in 1938. Ruth was born on 23 Dec 1894 in Birkdale, Lancashire 689,690 and died on 20 Sep 1977 in Edenbridge, Kent 691 at age 82.

Children from this marriage were:

   230 F    i. Jane Clark

   231 M    ii. Simon Crewe Clark

Geoffrey next married Mollie Grace Brickhill. Mollie was born on 27 Jun 1903 in Fylde, Lancashire, died on 7 Jul 1997 in Bournemouth, Dorset at age 94, and was buried in Clyst St. George, Exeter, Devon.

Some things about her life were:

• Probate Granted: 7 Jul 1997, Bristol. 692 Estate: Not exceeding £180,000

193. Marjorie May Clark was born on 7 Oct 1911 in 14 Rowlandson Terrace, Sunderland, Co. Durham, was baptised on 2 Nov 1911 in Christ Church, Bishopwearmouth, Co. Durham, and died on 17 Apr 1991 at age 79.

Marjorie married Charles Judge Lawrence in 1934 in Hampstead, Middlesex.513 Charles was born on 14 May 1911 in Islington, Middlesex and died on 13 Jul 1992 in Lewisham, Kent at age 81.

Children from this marriage were:

   232 F    i. Ann Patricia Lawrence

   233 M    ii. James Roy Lawrence


197. Ruth Clark was born on 29 Nov 1899 in 15 Hambledon View, Sunderland, Co. Durham, was baptised on 8 Nov 1900 in Christ Church, Bishopwearmouth, Co. Durham, and died on 2 Oct 1964 in 1 Mostyn Flats, Westbourne Road, Scarborough at age 64. Another name for Ruth was Ruth Clerk.

Some things about her life were:

• Probate Granted: 15 Jan 1965, London, England. 693 Effects: £13438

Ruth married John Gordon Hargrave,694 son of Gordon Hargrave and Babette Bing, in 1919 in St Giles, London.558 The marriage ended in Divorce circa 1950. John was born in 1894 in Midhurst, Sussex 694 and died on 21 Nov 1982 in London, England 694 at age 88.

Some things about his life were:

• Obituary: 25 Nov 1982, London, England. 694,695

MR JOHN HARGRAVE
Founder of prewar Green Shirt
movement

Mr John Hargrave who died on November 21 at the age of 88, had a long and extraordinary career as author, cartoonist, inventor, lexicographer, artist and psychic healer. But he was best known as "White Fox", the founder and leader of the Kibbo Kift and Green Shirt movements that were active between the wars.
The Kibbo Kift, whose members wore a woodcraft costume of cloak, hooded jerkin and shorts, never numbered more than a few hundred, though their influence was greater than that would suggest. The Green Shirts, who succeeded them, had a membership of several thousand and, with their advocacy of the ideas of "social credit", were seen by Hargrave as a counterweight to the fascists and left-wing activists.
Hargrave was born in 1894 and had little formal schooling. But he showed a precocious talent as an illustrator and at the age of 17 was appointed chief cartoonist to the London Evening Times. He also became active in the newly formed Boy Scout movement, was appointed Scout Commissioner for Woodcraft and Camping and was seen in some quarters as a likely successor to Baden Powell.
Increasingly, however, he found himself out of sympathy with the jingoism and militarism, as he saw them, of the movement, and finally broke with it in 1921. In the same year he launched the Kibbo Kift, which was opposed to war and emphasized tribal ritual, self-discipline and the family. Mrs Pethick Lawrence, the suffragette, became a member, and the advisory council included Havelock Ellis, Julian Huxley and H. G. Wells.
It was a measure of Hargrave’s qualities of leadership that in 1929 he was able to win the enthusiasm and agreement of the large majority of the Kibbo Kift movement to a far-reaching transformation. The exotic costumes and rituals were abandoned, the woodcraft life was left behind, and the movement emerged as the Green Shirts, wearing a paramilitary uniform of green shirt and beret and dedicated to Major C. H. Douglas's ideas of "social credit". They were strident in their condemnation of the entire banking and financial structure. But the Public Order Act of 1937, which banned political uniforms, dealt a mortal blow to their activities. During the 1920s and 1930s, in addition to pamphlets and articles, Hargrave had published six novels, culminating in Summer Time Ends (1935), which set out to present an epic kaleidoscope of British life and attitudes. Towards the end of the 1930s he turned his attention to technical matters and developed an automatic navigator for aircraft. He subsequently claimed that the device was the basis for equipment used in the Concorde and other supersonic aircraft and that he had not been given credit; but this was rejected after a public inquiry in 1976.
The postwar years saw Hargrave attempt to revitalize the social credit movement, but with little practical success. He continued to write, compiled a dictionary, and became recognised as an authority on Paracelsus, the scientist and mystic. For some years he practised psychic healing.
He was a man of great personal magnetism, powerful enthusiasms, and of penetrating, though unorthodox intellect. He was twice married, to Ruth Clark in 1919, and in 1968 to Gwendolen Gray, the actress, who survives him.

The child from this marriage was:

   234 M    i. Ivan Gordon Hargrave was born on 8 Oct 1920 in Watford, Hertfordshire 696 and died in Nov 1992 in Huddersfield 697 at age 72.

Ivan married Daphne Helen Nichols,697 daughter of Arthur Nichols and Gretchen Wickenden.

201. Leonard Hugh Clark 342 was born on 29 Jun 1921 342 and died on 8 Aug 1986 in Victoria, British Columbia 342 at age 65.


Luddy married Betty Sutherland McMillan.342 Betty was born on 10 Nov 1927.342

Children from this marriage were:

+ 235 F    i. Jennifer Mary Clark

+ 236 M    ii. David Anthony McMillan Clark

   237 M    iii. Gregory Leonard Clark

+ 238 F    iv. Kathryn Caroline Clark

205. Ethel Betty Clark was born on 28 Aug 1904 596 and died on 25 Oct 1999 in April Cottage, Shackstead Lane, Godalming, Surrey. 518,597 at age 95.

Some things about her life were:

• Cremation: 29 Oct 1999, Guildford Crematorium. 518

Betty married Graeme Verden, son of Mark Verden and Wallis Marie Riley, on 23 Jun 1928 in St Anselm's Church, Hatch End, Middlesex.598 Graeme was born in 1899 in London, England 698 and died on 4 Oct 1967 in King George V Hospital, Hambledon, Surrey 699 at age 68.

Some things about their marriage were:

• Wedding: 23 Jun 1928, Hatch End, Middlesex. 700 A local newspaper carried this report of Graeme & Betty's wedding:-

LOCAL WEDDINGS

CLARK - VERDEN

One of the prettiest weddings celebrated at St Anselm's Church, Hatch End, for some time was that which took place there on Saturday, when the vicar, the Rev. F. T. Lewis, officiated at the nuptial of Miss Ethel Betty Clark, daughter of the late Mr. J. C. Clark and Mrs Clark of Hazelmere, Hatch End, and Mr. Graeme Verden, son of Mr and Mrs Mark Verden, of White Steading, Amersham, and late of Pinnercote, Pinner. The bride was given away by the her brother, Mr J. S. Clark, and the bridegroom's brother, Mr. O. Verden, acted as best man. Miss Clark looked charming in a gown of white georgette beaded with silver, with her mother's veil of Brussels lace set in a headdress of orange blossom and pearls, part of the veil forming a train. She wore a pearl and sapphire brooch given her by the groom, and carried a bouquet of pink roses, lilies of the valley and white heather. Her bridesmaids, who numbered four, consisted of her two sisters, Phyllis and Joyce, dressed in blue and pink printed georgette with black picture hats and pearl necklaces; and Misses Elizabeth Holden and Diana Pearce, the nieces of the bridegroom, who wore white crepe-de-chine smocked in blue and pink. The first pair carried blue delphiniums, while Miss Holden and Miss Pearce held posies of pink and blue flowers, and wore turquoise brooches, gifts of the bridegroom. The Bride's mother wore a blue lace and georgette gown and a blue picture hat, and her flowers were pink roses. Mrs Verden was tastefully gowned in black lace. The church was attractively decorated for the occasion with blue and white flowers, and the service was fully choral and included bridal music beautifully rendered by Mr. A. C. Rackham, the organist at the church. After the wedding 150 guests attended a reception at Hazelmere, Royston-park. The wedding holiday is being spent in Cornwall, the bride travelling in a dress of blue georgette with a blue hat and stone marten fur given her by her husband.

Children from this marriage were:

   239 M    i. Robin Graeme Verden

   240 M    ii. James Anthony Verden 701 was born on 25 May 1935 701 and died on 19 May 2004 702,703 at age 68.

Some things about his life were:

• Cremation: 27 May 2004, Guildford Crematorium. 702

   241 M    iii. Richard Crome Verden

   242 F    iv. Mary Jane Verden was born on 16 Jul 1943 and died in Dec 1995 in Chichester, Hants. at age 52.

206. Joyce Clark was born on 20 Jan 1906 599 and died on 19 Mar 2002 600 at age 96.

Joyce married John Wilfred Buckland, son of Horace Wilfred Buckland, on 4 Jul 1931 in St Anselm's Church, Hatch End, Middlesex 601.,602 John was born on 19 Sep 1907 in Sevenoaks, Kent 704,705 and died in Nov 1999 in Eastbourne, Sussex 706 at age 92.

Some things about their marriage were:

• Wedding: 4 Jul 1931, St Anselm's Church, Hatch End, Middlesex. 602

THE OBSERVER AND GAZETTE
FRIDAY JULY 10,1931

WEDDING AT HATCH END

MARRIAGE OF MISS J. CLARK AND MR J. W. BUCKLAND

The Rev. F. T. Lewis, the vicar of St. Anslem's Church, Hatch End, officiated at a pretty and interesting wedding on Saturday, when the bride was Miss Joyce Clark, daughter of the late Mr J. C. Clark and Mrs Clark, of Hazelmere, Hatch End, and the bridegroom Mr. John Wilfred Buckland, son of the late Mr and Mrs H. W. Buckland. The bride who was escorted to the Church by her brother, Mr. J. S. Clark, looked charming in a wedding dress of cream satin with pearl trimmings, a veil of Brussels's net lent by her mother, and orange blossom and diamante headdress. She carried a sheaf of red roses and lilies of the valley. She was attended by three bridesmaids, the Misses P. M. Clark (sister), R. Buckland (sister of the bridegroom) and E. Rapson. They wore pretty tight fitting high waist ankle-length frocks of cream-backed flowered moire was short puff sleeves. Their shoes were red and they wore headdresses of crystal halos. They each had a crystal necklace, the gift of the bridegroom and carried Victorian posies. The bride's mother was attired in a black and beige lace gown with a black hat trimmed with pink and beige roses. Her bouquet was composed of roses. Mr. M. Shearme was the best man. The service was choral and during the signing of the register Mr. B. F. Statham gave a fine rendering of "A Song of Thanksgiving."

The reception was held at the bride's home and about 120 guests were present. Later the newly married pair left for the wedding holiday in North Devon, the bride travelling in a powder blue romaine frock and coat, with a collar of beige and squirrel and a blue hat.

Some things about his life were:

• Education: Sep 1921-Jul 1925, Repton School, Derbyshire. 707 John entered the School in September 1921 and left in July 1925. He was in Priory House. By the time he left he was a School Prefect and had been a member of the School Cricket XI in 1923, '24 and '25. He was also in the Football XI in 1924 and in the Fives IV.

• Military Service: 1940 to 1946, Various Places. 704 During WWII John first joined the Beds and Herts Regt. in 1940. Later transferring to the Royal Pioneer Corps in 1941 where he stayed until discharged in 1946. He ended the war as a Captain.

• Occupation: London, England. 704 John spent his career working at Lloyd's of London.

Children from this marriage were:

   243 M    i. John Bryan Buckland

   244 F    ii. Joanna Lee Buckland


207. John Stuart Clark was born on 4 Jul 1907 588,603 and died on 4 Jul 1991 in Porthgwara Nursing Home, Coverack, Cornwall 604,605 at age 84.

Some things about his life were:

• Education: Sep 1921-Jul 1925, Repton School, Derbyshire. 588 Was a Scholar in Priory House. Football Xl in 1924.

John married Joan Lingham-Power, daughter of Capt. A Lingham-Power, on 15 Jul 1933 in St Anselm's Church, Hatch End, Middlesex 606.,607 The marriage ended in Divorce. Joan was born on 11 Feb 1909 and died in 1949 in Watford, Hertfordshire 708 at age 40.

Some things about their marriage were:

• Wedding: 21 Jul 1933, Pinner, Middlesex. 709 Joan's and John's wedding was reported in the local newspaper:-

PRETTY WEDDINGS AT PINNER
[There were several weddings reported]

CLARK — LINGHAM-POWER

An exceptionally pretty weddings took place at St. Anslem's Church, Hatch End, on Saturday, when the vicar, the Rev. F. T. Lewis, united in matrimony Miss Joan Lingham-Power, daughter of the late Capt. A. Lingham-Power and Mrs. Carter, of 31, Talbot-road, London, and Mr. John Stuart Clark, son of the late Mr. J. C. Clark, and Mrs. Clark, of Hazlemere, Hatch End.

The bride wore a delightful dress of white satin with a cowl neck and puff sleeves fitting tight to the wrist, with a small train and a Brussel's lace veil, lent by the bridegroom's mother. Her pearl necklace was the gift of the bridegroom and she carried a sheaf of Harrisie lilies. The bridesmaids, Miss Phyllis M. Clark, sister of the bridegroom and Miss Sybil Winslade, all wore dresses of apricots lace and organdi with picture hats of leghorn trimmed with organdi. They had chromium bracelets, gifts of the bridegroom and carried roses of a deep apricot shade. The mother of the bride was dressed in flowered chiffon and a large blue hat, while the bridegroom's mother was attired in a dress of navy and white heavy silk, with a small navy hat with eye veil.

Among the guests who attended the reception at Hazlemere, Hatch End, were the bridegroom's grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. J. L. Clark, of Hunstanton.

The honeymoon is being spent in Devon and the bride went away in a yellow suit with a silver fox fur, the gift of the bridegroom.

On their return Mr. and Mrs. Clark will reside at Pinner Green.

The child from this marriage was:

+ 245 M    i. Nigel Culliford Clark was born on 6 Nov 1935,588,710 died on 25 Aug 2007 in Helford, Cornwall at age 71, and was buried on 5 Sep 2007 in St Anthony-in-Meneage, Cornwall.711

John next married Mary Webster Gradwell, daughter of George Case Gradwell and Ethel Webster, in 1947 in Abingdon, Bucks.608 Jane was born on 11 Feb 1912 in Hendon, Middlesex 713 and died in Mar 2005 in Buckinghamshire 714 at age 93.

The child from this marriage was:

+ 246 F    i. Gillian M S Clark


208. Janet Clark 612 was born in 1907 612 and died in 1981 613,614 at age 74.

Janet married Canon Edward H Burbidge,613,716 son of William Burbidge and Mary Eleanor Simmonds, in 1934 in Aldershot, Hampshire.615 Edward was born in 1907 717 and died in 1997 717 at age 90.

Marriage Notes: Janet's wedding day was 25/8/1934 according to a note on the back of a photograph of her father Stanley

General Notes: Sometime Rector of Arreton, IOW and later Canon of ???? in Perth, Australia.

Children from this marriage were:

   247 M    i. William Richard Burbidge

   248 M    ii. Andrew Arnold Burbidge

   249 M    iii. Thomas Edward Burbidge


209. Nancy Clark was born in 1909 616 and died on 23 Aug 1999 in Hampshire 613 at age 90.

Some things about her life were:

• Probate Granted: 1 Nov 1999, Winchester. 718 Effects: £387843, gross; £386,409, net

Nancy married Kenneth H L Key 613,618 in 1936 in Kensington, Middlesex 617.,618 The marriage ended in Divorce circa 1948. Kenneth was born on 28 Aug 1911 in Cape Town, South Africa 719 and died in Jan 2002 in Australia at age 90.

Some things about his life were:

• Honoured: Nov 2001, Canberra, Australia. 720 The Australian Academy of Science in its Newsletter (August/November 2001) paid its respects to Fellows of the Academy who had recently turned 90 years of age. Kenneth was amongst those who had a honourable mention with a brief curriculum vitae:

Dr Kenneth Key was born on 28 August 1911 in Cape Town. After studying in Cape Town and London he joined the CSIRO Division of Entomology in 1936. He retired in 1976 but continued as honorary fellow until 1992, serving 55 years with the organisation. He was Chief Curator of the Australian National Insect Collection from 1959 to 1970.

Dr Key is distinguished for his work on the ecology and taxonomy of Australian locusts and grasshoppers. His team at CSIRO established the fundamental causes of locust outbreaks in eastern Australia and thus provided the knowledge needed for control, As well as being an authority on physical ecology, he made significant advances in general taxonomy.

Children from this marriage were:

   250 F    i. Sarah Ann Key

   251 F    ii. Katherine Joyce Key

218. Capt. Michael Montagu Cowper Clark MC was born in 1920 in Norfolk 646 and died in 1999 at age 79.

Some things about his life were:

• Education: Sep 1934-Jul 1938, Sherborne School, Dorset. 721 Was in VIth Form, 1st Hockey Xl and also Gym team.

• Military Award: 16 Apr 1942, London, England. 722 Awarded Military Cross "in recognition of gallantry and distinguished service in the Middle East" during World War 2.

Michael married Bridget Osler K Holt in 1956 in Marylebone, London.647    

The child from this marriage was:

   252 F    i. Sophia E Francis Clark


220. Elizabeth Jean Clark was born on 2 Sep 1916 in 8 Cliff Parade, Hunstanton, Norfolk 659 and died on 9 Dec 1981 in London, England 435,658,660 at age 65.

Some things about her life were:

• Probate Granted: 15 Jun 1982, London, England. 723 Effects: £85364

Jean married Commander William Basil Ayscough Wilkinson R.N., son of Basil Henry Wilkinson and Christina Curwen Banks, on 18 Jul 1936 in Bushey Parish Church, Hertfordshire.661 The marriage ended in Divorce. William was born on 1 Oct 1909 in Watford, Hertfordshire 724,725 and died on 25 May 1988 in Devon 726 at age 78.

Some things about their marriage were:

• Wedding: 18 Jul 1936, Bushey Heath. 727 A local newspaper reported William & Jean's wedding:-

Saturday July 25, 1936

Lieut. W. B. A. WILKINSON and MISS E. J. CLARK

The Rector (the Rev. G. Montague Hall) assisted by the Rev. E. S. Ulyat, R.N. officiated at the wedding, which took place at Bushey Parish Church on Saturday, of Lieut. (E) William Basil Ayscough Wilkinson, R.N., elder son of the late Mr. and Mrs. Basil H Wilkinson late of Bushey Heath, and Miss Elizabeth Jean Clark, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Malcolm Clark of Sparrows Herne House, Bushey Heath, and grand-daughter of the late Mrs. and Mr. L. Clark who resided for many years at the Elms, Watford. The service included the hymns "Praise my Soul," "O Perfect Love," and "Love Divine," and Psalm xxiii., "The Lord is my Shepherd." The bride, who was given away by her father, was attired in white satin with a train cut in one with the skirt, tulle veil held in place with a wreath of orange blossom and myrtle, and a necklace and bracelets of orange blossom and myrtle; she carried a bouquet of Madonna lilies.

She was attended by five bridesmaids and a small train-bearer - Miss Marjorie Westerbery (cousin of bride), Miss Margaret Peat, Miss Ruth Magnus, Miss Jean Sweet, Miss Pamela Stokes, and Master Robin Verden (train-bearer), cousin of the bride. The bridesmaids wore white organdza dresses with wreaths of marguerites and carried bouquets of marguerites and gysophila. Their gifts from the bridegroom were gold Naval badge brooches. Lieut. (E.) A. Kirkonnel, R.N., was best man. After a reception at Sparrows Herne House the newly-married couple left by car for a honeymoon in Scotland. The bride travelled in a beige dress, short coat, belt, gloves, a small hat trimmed with green, and fox fur to match.

As the bridal procession left the Church it was greeted by the pack of the Middlesex Farmers' Draghunt.

Some things about his life were:

• Probate Granted: 26 Jul 1988, Bristol. 728 Estate: Not Exceeding £70,000

Children from this marriage were:

   253 F    i. Elizabeth S Wilkinson

   254 F    ii. Christina Margaret Wilkinson was born on 18 Jan 1942 in North London,729 died on 30 Jun 1998 in Norfolk 730 at age 56, and was buried in St Mary the Virgin, Barney, Norfolk.731

Tinty married Alan Dominic Low.

Jean next married Charles Bernard Van den Broek d'Obrenan, son of Frantz Van den Broek d'Obrenan, on 16 Aug 1946 in Marylebone, London 662.,663 Charles was born <1909> and died before 1964.

Marriage Notes: Sadly, there is mostly only sketchy, anecdotal information about Jean's marriage to Charles who was said to be a French Count with property in France & Tahiti. We do know, however, that they were married in London on the 16th of August 1946 in the the presence of Jean's parents and, according to the marriage register, Charles was a bachelor and a major in the French army; there is no mention of any noble title.

The story has it that they then left a war-torn England on board Charles's boat and sailed off to Tahiti leaving behind both of Jean's young daughters in the care of her mother & father. There is also a tale that Charles became so furious with a member of his crew for flirting with Jean that he threw him overboard — one hopes that he also rescued the man before he drowned! Charles & Jean are reported to have remained together until the former died but whether they lived in France or elsewhere is not known; Jean then came back to England and married John Ede in 1964.

Jean must have met Charles during WWII and, because of the hostilities, that can only have occurred in London or the Home Counties. In view of this, it is very likely that Charles came to England during the war to serve with the Free French Force here led by Charles de Gaulle. Jean would have been a lonely young wife with William away in the Navy fighting the War and, living in North London, she would have had the opportunity and, doubtless, the inclination for an affair with a glamorous Frenchman. As things turned out it was to be something more than just an affair!

So the family stories have it that Charles was French, keen on sailing and had connections with Tahiti. Those bits of information make one wonder whether or not Jean's Charles has been confused with Charles Van den Broek d'Obrenan who had a book published in Paris in 1939 about an expedition that he and others had made to the South Pacific. The book was called "Le Voyage de La Korrigane" and it was an account of an ethnographic expedition that had been sponsored by the Musée d'Ethnographie du Trocadéro (a forerunner of the Musée de l'Homme in Paris) which had taken place in the 1930s.

In March 1934 the schooner La Korrigane (an old Icelandic cod fishing boat) had sailed from Marseille on an around-the-world voyage of over two years. On board there had been nine crew and two couples, Étienne & Monique de Ganay and Charles & Régine van den Broek d'Obrenan, and their photographer friend Jean Ratisbonne. They had spent about 1½ years in the South Pacific visiting mostly the Polynesian islands including Tahiti and had returned, via Indonesia & Sri Lanka, to Marseille in June 1936. Étienne is described as "le comte", the Count, and he commanded the expedition; his sister Régine was Charles's wife at that time and may have styled herself Countess but there is no evidence that Charles himself was anything other than Monsieur van den Broek d'Obrenan. This Charles is reported as having died in 1956.

Charles and his wife Régine came to England from New Zealand in October 1943 and in the ship's list of passengers Charles is described as a government anthropologist; they gave their destination address as c/o The Free French Committee, 4 Carlton Gardens, London. There may have been a connection between Charles & Régine and Jean's Charles; it is odd that they both were sailors & had connections with Tahiti but the true story about Jean's Charles may have been more prosaic. 374,733


Jean next married John Alexander Montague Ede, son of Bertram Montague Ede and Alice Enderica Warde, in 1964 in Chelsea, London.664 John was born on 1 May 1924 in Sevenoaks, Kent 734,735 and died on 8 Aug 1984 in London, England 736 at age 60.

Some things about his life were:

• Probate Granted: 8 Aug 1984, Winchester. 737 Estate: £117724

223. Virginia Evelyn Frances Clark was born on 19 Nov 1937 in Sunninghill, Berkshire 682,683 and died on 26 Jan 1997 in London, England 684 at age 59.

Virginia married David Richard Louis Duncan, son of David S Duncan and Beryl A Blenkinsop.

Children from this marriage were:

   255 F    i. Suzanna Beryl Duncan

Suzanna married Martin D Troy.686

   256 F    ii. Belinda Sophie Duncan

   257 F    iii. Katherine Penelope Duncan

Katherine married Andrew John MacDonald.686  


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226. Robert John Clark 476 was born in 1912 476 and died in 1992 476 at age 80.

Robert married Dorothy May McClintock.476 Dorothy was born in 1913 476 and died in 1977 476 at age 64.

Children from this marriage were:

+ 258 F    i. Ione Carlotta Jeanetta Clark 476 was born in 1932 476 and died in 1984 476 at age 52.

+ 259 F    ii. Robin Caroline Clark

227. Eileen Clark

Eileen married Roland Richards.

Children from this marriage were:

   260 M    i. Jeffrey Richards

   261 F    ii. Anita Richards

   262 M    iii. Robert Richards

228. Mary Clark

Gipsy married Arthur Robinson.476

Children from this marriage were:

   263 M    i. Arthur Jeffrey Robinson

   264 F    ii. Vivienne Robinson

235. Jennifer Mary Clark

Jennifer married Fred Herfst.342

Children from this marriage were:

   265 M    i. Andrew William Herfst

   266 F    ii. Marta Elizabeth Herfst

236. David Anthony McMillan Clark

David married Heather Mary Grampp.342

Children from this marriage were:

   267 M    i. Benjamin Lee Alexander Clark

   268 F    ii. Julia Robin Elizabeth Clark

238. Kathryn Caroline Clark

Katy married Robert William McIntosh.342 Robert was born in Jun 1957 342 and died on 31 Dec 1997 342 at age 40.

Children from this marriage were:

   269 M    i. Samuel Robert McIntosh

   270 F    ii. Amelia Claire McIntosh


245. Nigel Culliford Clark was born on 6 Nov 1935,588,710 died on 25 Aug 2007 in Helford, Cornwall at age 71, and was buried on 5 Sep 2007 in St Anthony-in-Meneage, Cornwall.711

Some things about his life were:

• Education: Sep 1949-Jul 1954, Repton School, Derbyshire. 588 Was in Priory House and became a School Prefect and Head of House. Football Xl 1952 & 1953 and Hockey Xl 1953 and Captain in 1954.

• Obituary: 19 Sep 2007, London. 740 The Times carried the following obituary for Nigel:

NIGEL CLARK
Advertising executive who became a formidable fundraiser for Great Ormond Street Hospital

Through his energy, dedication and formidable fundraising abilities, Nigel Clark transformed the fortunes of Great Ormond Street Hospital. When he took over as its fundraising chief in 1994, its appeals were bringing in £5.4 million a year. When he retired last year, this had soared to £28.5 million. His team raised more than £200 million during his 11 years at the hospital.

He was also a passionate supporter of racing charities and, as well as belonging to several owners' syndicates, had served as president of the Racehorse Owners' Association and as a dynamic chairman of Kempton Park.

Nigel Clark was born in 1935 and grew up in Maidenhead and then in Cornwall. In 1958, after Repton and National Service with the 8th Royal Irish Hussars, he went into advertising with the London Press Exchange. He joined Collett Dickenson Pearce as an account manager in 1966 and stayed with the firm until 1991, working on such accounts as Hovis, Heinz and the Army, and rising to joint managing director, then deputy chairman.

It was in this capacity that he first came into contact with Great Ormond Street, working pro bono in the Wishing Well Appeal in the late 1980s. This drive, the first capital appeal for an NHS hospital, raised £54 million and did much to fix Great Ormond Street in the public consciousness. This was no small part due to the logo that Clark's team devised, featuring a child's face shedding a single teardrop.

Clark moved in 1991 to spend four years as joint vice-chairman at the Lowe Howard-Spink agency, despite the hospitals's efforts to entice him to take a permanent fundraising post. He agreed, however, to become executive chairman of the Great Ormond Street Hospital Children's Charity in 1994. It was initially a part-time, two-day-a- week job. But, he said, "after 18 months or so I realised that it wasn't enough."

He left advertising altogether in 1995 to focus on his fundraising. He resigned in 2000, but his successor left after six months so he returned for another five years. His contribution was, according to the hospital's chief executive, Dr Jane Collins, crucial to making Great Ormond Street one of the world's leading children's hospitals.

Clark bought much of the same passion to racing, which had began [sic] to interest him seriously in his early twenties. In addition to the syndicates of which he was a member, he held several positions which helped to shape the world of racing. He led the British Horseracing Board committee which recommended the introduction of Sunday racing in the late 1990s, and in 1977-94 was on the Council of the Racehorse Owners' Association, serving as its president, 1984-86.

As a chairman of Kempton Park for 10 years from 1996, he was one of the driving forces behind the development of an all-weather track. He was criticised for this by many who feared it would mean the end of jump racing at the track, but Clark — who had a keen interest in jumping himself — ensured that this did not happen.

Clark also bought his fundraising skills to racing — this summer a dinner at Windsor racecourse that he organised raised £260,000 for charities including the St. John ambulance and the Starlight Foundation. He was also a trustee of Racing Welfare and of the British Racing School.

He was deputy lieutenant of Richmond, and a JP, as well as chairing a committee that raised £4.5 million for a cancer unit at Kingston Hospital. He is survived by his wife, Jane, and his two daughters.

Nigel Clark, advertising executive and charity fundraiser, was born November 6, 1935. He died of a heart attack on August 25, 2007, aged 71

Nigel married Julia Jane Archer, daughter of Colonel George Francis H Archer and Hester McPhail Johnston.

Children from this marriage were:

   271 F    i. Alexandra Sarah Culliford Clark

   272 F    ii. Georgina Victoria Culliford Clark

246. Gillian M S Clark

Gillian married Peter Arnold Hall.702

Children from this marriage were:

   273 M    i. Nicolas Robert S A Hall

   274 F    ii. Camille Jane K Hall

   275 F    iii. unknown Hall

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258. Ione Carlotta Jeanetta Clark 476 was born in 1932 476 and died in 1984 476 at age 52.

Ione married Owen Bateman.476

Children from this marriage were:

   276 F    i. Elizabeth Ione Bateman

   277 M    ii. Bruce Robert Bateman

259. Robin Caroline Clark

Robin married Keith Longman.

The child from this marriage was:

   278 M    i. Kingsley John Longman

Robin next married Peter Anthony Wade.

The child from this marriage was:

   279 M    i. Anthony Robert Wade 


ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS:

The picture of Hetton Colliery "C" Pit by Thomas Hair is reproduced by kind permission of the Hatton Gallery, University of Newcastle upon Tyne.

The engraving of The Bishopswearmouth Iron Works is reproduced by kind permission of the SINE Project, The Museum of Antiquities, University of Newcastle upon Tyne.


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